Wikileaks – Confirms what most Guyanese knew,

the Bharrat Jagdeo PPP/C are a cocaine friendly

government

August 27, 2011
 

Guyana heading for narco-statehood; govt lukewarm about drug trade– Wikileaks|

 

Written by Demerara Waves Saturday, 27 August 2011 13:47

The United States (US) badly wants a Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) office in Guyana because the South American country is approaching narco-statehood, already resulting in drug seeping into almost all layers of the society.

“Post requests the formal establishment of a DEA office at Embassy Georgetown. Guyana is well on its way to narco-statehood — a prospect that poses a real threat to U.S. interests,” said then American ambassador, Roland Bullen.

The cable was dispatched on May 24, 2006 to, among others, the US Secretary of State, DEA Headquarters in Washington. “The level of narco-trafficking influence on the political, judicial and economic systems in Guyana creates ripe conditions for the emergence of a narco- state,” the Grenada-born ambassador told his principals as well as counterparts in Trinidad, Suriname and Venezuela.

The American envoy believed that a DEA presence in Guyana would significantly improve the US government’s ability to fight drug trafficking in Guyana.

Bullen noted that while Guyana, with a population of 750,000 people and an official Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of less than US$1 billion does not attract much US government attention, narco-traffickers regarded Guyana where they can “operate with impunity” partly because of its geography, law enforcement corruption and a government that is less than enthusiastic about smashing the drug trade.

“They see a country with porous borders, corrupt and ineffective law enforcement, little or no control over its airspace, vast swaths of uncontrolled land, ready access to the Caribbean, North America, and Europe, and a government that has been lukewarm about clamping down on the drug trade,” Bullen said in his missive.

In an earlier cable dated January 6, 2006, Bullen noted that the two countries have been talking about setting up a DEA office here since 1999 and questioned the Guyana government’s sincerity in wanting one. “The current stumbling block is the GoG’s inability or reluctance to give approval for basic logistical details. Post’s position remains the same — the USG is ready to work with and advise the GoG as soon as the GoG is fully prepared to move forward in its fight against narco-trafficking.”

The Guyana government has, over the years, complained bitterly that countries like the US have been reluctant to provide enough funding and other rescources to combat the narco-trade. Guyana expects support through the one-year old US-Caribbean Basin Secuity Initiative (CBSI) to fight the narcotics trade and money laundering.

In the May 24, 2006 cable , the American envoy described as “an especially disturbing development” was Guyana’s involvement in “drugs for arms; financing for insurgent groups like the FARC throughout the region.

In addition, large-scale Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia (AUC) infiltration into Venezuela has led to their playing a significant role in narcotics smuggling activities on the Guyana/Venezuela border, he said.

The US embassy’ primary objective in 2008 of disrupting criminal organisations was, he said, difficult by the lack of a permanent DEA presence in Guyana. The office in Trinidad is fully pre-occupied with the counter-narcotics initiatives in their host nation.

Describing the narco-situation in Guyana as “severe”, he said the DEA could work more effectively to accomplish the critical MPP counter-narcotics objectives and provide more sustained support to local law enforcement agencies in Guyana.

The DEA was expected to establish a vetted counter-narcotics unit in Guyana but the ambassador told the Secretary of State that he was worried that it could become infected by corruption.

“An important challenge facing this unit is the pervasive corruption in the country, which has undermined previous Guyanese counter-narcotics initiatives,” he said, adding that establishing a DEA office will allow close and constant monitoring of the vetted unit to help alleviate this problem.”

Original Post

Quote "Bullen noted that while Guyana, with a population of 750,000 people and an official Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of less than US$1 billion does not attract much US government attention, narco-traffickers regarded Guyana where they can “operate with impunity” partly because of its geography, law enforcement corruption and a government that is less than enthusiastic about smashing the drug trade."unquote

 

Drugs in timber,

Drugs in Fishes

Drugs in Vegetables and Fruits

Drugs hidden in Body Parts

Drugs here and  there and everywhere.

 

.

Quote "The American reticence on drug trafficking in Guyana has caused widespread consternation among political observers. How could the Americans be so blind to the political angles? It had to be the sea breeze that has induced sleep over the past ten years.
The American Ambassador told the media that even if Guyana is given an extension to comply with money-laundering operations by the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force at their meeting in Nicaragua, there still may be sanctions against Guyana, because there has been no successful prosecution of money launderers. The Ambassador must be saying to himself; “God, not even one.unquote”

Guyana’s Anti Money Laundering

deficiencies flagged in Intl Narcotics

Report

March 4, 2014 | By | Filed Under News 
 

…influence of drug trafficking evident in political, criminal justice systems

“Guyana is a party to the Inter-American Convention against Corruption, but has not fully implemented its provisions, such as the seizure of property obtained through corruption”

 

Guyana’s problems regarding anti money laundering for the first time in years has escalated to the point where it has become a feature of the US State Department’s International Narcotics Control Strategy report.
The 2014 report was released yesterday and while the country was not among the highest offenders in the Caribbean as it relates to drugs, its problems with the money laundering did come in for scathing words.
The report said that the Anti-Money Laundering and Countering the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) Act, the Interception of Communications Act, and the Criminal Law Procedure Act (revised in 1998) were all designed to enhance the investigative capabilities of law enforcement and prosecutors in obtaining convictions of drug traffickers in Guyana but to date, the Government has sought no prosecutions under these laws.
The report documented that the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF) has informed Guyana that failure to demonstrate effective implementation of anti-money laundering mechanisms could lead to an international designation of Guyana as a country with significant financial sector risks.
According to the US State Department Report, “Such a designation would increase the costs of Guyana’s international financial transactions and also impact insurance rates.
It noted that the Guyanese authorities have pledged to increase efforts to comply with international anti-money laundering standards and have presented amendments in Parliament to improve existing legislation.
The United States supports the Government of Guyana’s efforts in this area and has offered technical assistance.
According to the Report, Guyana continues to be a transit country for cocaine destined for the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, and West Africa.
It states that cocaine originating in Colombia is smuggled to Venezuela and onward to Guyana by sea or air. Smugglers also transit land borders with Brazil, Venezuela, and Suriname.
Cocaine is often concealed in legitimate commodities and smuggled via commercial maritime vessels, air transport, human couriers, or various postal methods.
According to the report, the influence of narcotics trafficking is evident in Guyana’s political and criminal justice systems.
It notes that traffickers are attracted by the country’s poorly monitored ports, remote airstrips, intricate river networks, porous land borders, and weak security sector capacity.
In June, the Guyana Police Force reported seizing 418.09 kilograms (kg) of cocaine and 125.61 metric tons of cannabis.
CANU reported seizing 55.39 kg of cocaine and 2.62 kg of cannabis.
The GRA seized 359.8 kg of cocaine, but no cannabis.
The US Report said that Guyanese authorities convicted 201 persons on drug related charges during the first six months of 2013.
It said that in September, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) met with Guyanese counterparts to advance efforts to investigate and dismantle drug trafficking organizations.
During their visit, DEA officials participated in a Guyana Police Force eradication of cannabis fields discovered in the interior, chopping down and destroying an estimated 124 MT of cannabis plants.
“The volume of cannabis reflects the increasing trend of farm-grown marijuana for local use and international export.”
According to the US report, as a matter of policy, the Government of Guyana does not encourage or facilitate the illicit production or distribution of narcotics or psychotropic drugs or other controlled substances, or the laundering of proceeds from illegal drug transactions.
“Guyana is a party to the Inter-American Convention against Corruption, but has not fully implemented its provisions, such as the seizure of property obtained through corruption.”

"During their visit, DEA officials participated in a Guyana Police Force eradication of cannabis fields discovered in the interior, chopping down and destroying an estimated 124 MT of cannabis plants.”

 

 

 

 

Dat part make Iman cringe.

Originally Posted by cain:

"During their visit, DEA officials participated in a Guyana Police Force eradication of cannabis fields discovered in the interior, chopping down and destroying an estimated 124 MT of cannabis plants.”

 

 

 

 

Dat part make Iman cringe.

124 metric tonnes. You could mek clothes, bedding etc there Cainster

Originally Posted by Bruddaman:
Originally Posted by cain:

"During their visit, DEA officials participated in a Guyana Police Force eradication of cannabis fields discovered in the interior, chopping down and destroying an estimated 124 MT of cannabis plants.”

 

 

 

 

Dat part make Iman cringe.

124 metric tonnes. You could mek clothes, bedding etc there Cainster

Brudds what's happening?

 

 

This thread was when asj was smart, doan know what happened to that banna. guy.

 

 

Wikileaks – Confirms what most Guyanese knew,

the Bharrat Jagdeo PPP/C are a cocaine friendly

government

August 27, 2011
 

Guyana heading for narco-statehood; govt lukewarm about drug trade– Wikileaks|

 

Written by Demerara Waves Saturday, 27 August 2011 13:47

The United States (US) badly wants a Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) office in Guyana because the South American country is approaching narco-statehood, already resulting in drug seeping into almost all layers of the society.

“Post requests the formal establishment of a DEA office at Embassy Georgetown. Guyana is well on its way to narco-statehood — a prospect that poses a real threat to U.S. interests,” said then American ambassador, Roland Bullen.

Originally Posted by Ramakant-P:

Did the Granger Government changed the culture?  No they didn't.  As a matter of fact they intend to take over the trade to finance their party election bid in 2020. 

I beg your pardon? Follow the news, don't just make up shit.

Yes druggie, Jagdeo and drugs according to WikiLeaks.

In fact the US government thought that if they told Jagdeo anything, he would immediately run and tell his narco trafficker friends.  Especially that infamous one rotting in a US jail, who has endured gang rapes on several occasions.  The one who druggie calls a hero.

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