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with a plurality of the vote, but falling short of an 'Absolute Majority'?

1. Appoint his cabinet from his minority elected members?
2. Would it not be a lame duck presidency and is destined to fail/ fall with the introduction of first major bill in Parliament without any support from the opposition?

According to the Guyana Constitution, Title 4, The President, Article 177 (2):
"A Presidential candidate shall be deemed to have been elected as President and shall be so declared by the Chairman of the Elections Commission –– (a) if he is the only Presidential candidate at the election; or (b) where there are two or more Presidential candidates, if more votes are cast in favour of the list in which he is designated as Presidential candidate than in favour of any other list."
(http://pdba.georgetown.edu/Constitutions/Guyana/guyana96.html)
The party that wins a majority or a plurality of the votes wins the presidency and gets to form the government. No post-election coalition is constitutionally possible, and certainly none, not even a formal/informal alliance, can be formed with the aim to seize the presidency and the government or to unseat the government.
Original Post
quote:
The party that wins a majority or a plurality of the votes wins the presidency and gets to form the government. No post-election coalition is constitutionally possible, and certainly none, not even a formal/informal alliance, can be formed with the aim to seize the presidency and the government or to unseat the government.


The PPP/C likes it this way, even if they were to receive less than the 50 percent of the votes, they will still get to form the Government, the problem is that without a majority, they will very well not get things done in Parliament, but there is an easy way to get by this...parliamentarians has been known to cross floor. The PPP/C can get a few to come over to their side if the price is right.

.
quote:
Originally posted by asj:
quote:
The party that wins a majority or a plurality of the votes wins the presidency and gets to form the government. No post-election coalition is constitutionally possible, and certainly none, not even a formal/informal alliance, can be formed with the aim to seize the presidency and the government or to unseat the government.


The PPP/C likes it this way, even if they were to receive less than the 50 percent of the votes, they will still get to form the Government, the problem is that without a majority, they will very well not get things done in Parliament, but there is an easy way to get by this...parliamentarians has been known to cross floor. The PPP/C can get a few to come over to their side if the price is right.
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Oh yeah, there's never a lack of bribery when dealing with the PPP.
quote:
Originally posted by asj:
quote:
The party that wins a majority or a plurality of the votes wins the presidency and gets to form the government. No post-election coalition is constitutionally possible, and certainly none, not even a formal/informal alliance, can be formed with the aim to seize the presidency and the government or to unseat the government.


The PPP/C likes it this way, even if they were to receive less than the 50 percent of the votes, they will still get to form the Government, the problem is that without a majority, they will very well not get things done in Parliament, but there is an easy way to get by this...parliamentarians has been known to cross floor. The PPP/C can get a few to come over to their side if the price is right.

.
they cross the floor and their leader fire their behinds.
quote:
Originally posted by cain:
quote:
Originally posted by asj:
quote:
The party that wins a majority or a plurality of the votes wins the presidency and gets to form the government. No post-election coalition is constitutionally possible, and certainly none, not even a formal/informal alliance, can be formed with the aim to seize the presidency and the government or to unseat the government.


The PPP/C likes it this way, even if they were to receive less than the 50 percent of the votes, they will still get to form the Government, the problem is that without a majority, they will very well not get things done in Parliament, but there is an easy way to get by this...parliamentarians has been known to cross floor. The PPP/C can get a few to come over to their side if the price is right.
.



Oh yeah, there's never a lack of bribery when dealing with the PPP.


Elected members of the AFC and APNU might very well see this as an opportunity, Gehrard might, a way for him to serve his county and later moved up to a Ministerial Position...as he has nowhere to go with the AFC: It is called lets make a deal........not bribery Big Grin

Remember one guy named Mansoor Nadir? Minister of Labor.

.
quote:
Originally posted by cain:
quote:
Originally posted by asj:
quote:
The party that wins a majority or a plurality of the votes wins the presidency and gets to form the government. No post-election coalition is constitutionally possible, and certainly none, not even a formal/informal alliance, can be formed with the aim to seize the presidency and the government or to unseat the government.


The PPP/C likes it this way, even if they were to receive less than the 50 percent of the votes, they will still get to form the Government, the problem is that without a majority, they will very well not get things done in Parliament, but there is an easy way to get by this...parliamentarians has been known to cross floor. The PPP/C can get a few to come over to their side if the price is right.
.



Oh yeah, there's never a lack of bribery when dealing with the PPP.


It's called PERSUATION, INFLUENCE and COLLABORATION - expressing each other's interests for the good of the country.

Therefore, if there is a minority Govt., the Govt. will try its best to reach agreements.
quote:
Originally posted by Catherine:
quote:
Originally posted by cain:
quote:
Originally posted by asj:
quote:
The party that wins a majority or a plurality of the votes wins the presidency and gets to form the government. No post-election coalition is constitutionally possible, and certainly none, not even a formal/informal alliance, can be formed with the aim to seize the presidency and the government or to unseat the government.


The PPP/C likes it this way, even if they were to receive less than the 50 percent of the votes, they will still get to form the Government, the problem is that without a majority, they will very well not get things done in Parliament, but there is an easy way to get by this...parliamentarians has been known to cross floor. The PPP/C can get a few to come over to their side if the price is right.
.



Oh yeah, there's never a lack of bribery when dealing with the PPP.


It's called PERSUATION, INFLUENCE and COLLABORATION - expressing each other's interests for the good of the country.

Therefore, if there is a minority Govt., the Govt. will try its best to reach agreements.
like constitution reform abolishing the executive presidency? How about direct representation?....I hope it happens so we open an criminal investigation on the spending of the wildlife funds, lottery funds, Amerind residual funds etc. Then there is the matter of hiring all of those implanted pickneys in cushy jobs!
I do not subscribe to a scenario where individual members of the opposition may be enticed to support or form alliances unless it is with broad consensus and approval of their party. After all they were elected as a slate and not as individual of constituency . In such a situation, those incorporated members ought to remain loyal to their party caucus, in whose hands the right to recall is strongly reposed. Anything less would be feather bedding and self serving.
If the PPP forms the gov't with 45% of the popular votes then we can expect a hung parliament. I don't know how much executive powers the president has to work around some of the hurdles parliament presents. One nice thing about the present constitution is that no one can serve more than two terms.
I thought the Guyanese brainiacs like Shahabudeen, Ramphal, and the Luckhoos were smarter than this. Maybe we should bring in Sharma as part of a constitutional review team.
quote:
Originally posted by Mara:
After all they were elected as a slate and not as individual of constituency ..


This would suggest that they cannot cross the floor. If they leave the party on which slate they were elected they leave the party and parliament. After all seat allocations arent by constituency, but by total votes cast nationally, and within a region.

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