The Story Behind TIME's Trump 'Welcome to America' Cover

The Story Behind TIME's Trump 'Welcome to America' Cover

By TIME Staff, 7:00 AM EDT, June 21, 2018, http://time.com/5317522/donald-trump-border-cover/

John Moore, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer for Getty Images, has been photographing immigrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border for years. This week one of his pictures became the most visible symbol of the immigration debate in America.

Original Post

The Story Behind TIME's Trump 'Welcome to America' Cover

By TIME Staff, 7:00 AM EDT, June 21, 2018, http://time.com/5317522/donald-trump-border-cover/

John Moore, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer for Getty Images, has been photographing immigrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border for years. This week one of his pictures became the most visible symbol of the immigration debate in America.

“This one was tough for me. As soon as it was over, they were put into a van. I had to stop and take deep breaths,” Moore told TIME Tuesday, describing his reaction to the scene of a two-year-old Honduran girl crying as her mother was being detained in McAllen, Texas. “All I wanted to do was pick her up. But I couldn’t.”

John Moore—Getty Images
John Moore—Getty Images

Due to the power of the image, which appeared as critics from across the political spectrum attacked President Trump’s now-reversed policy of separating children from parents who are being detained for illegally entering the United States, TIME’s editors selected Moore’s photograph to create a photo illustration, including Trump, to make the July 2, 2018, cover of the magazine.

TIME Photo-Illustration. Photographs by Getty Images

‘All I Wanted to Do Was Pick Her Up.’ How a Photographer at the U.S.-Mexico Border Made an Image America Could Not Ignore

"This one was tough for me. As soon as it was over, they were put into a van. I had to stop and take deep breaths," Getty photographer John Moore said
 
A two-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018. The asylum seekers had rafted across the Rio Grande from Mexico and were detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents before being sent to a processing center for possible separation.

John Moore has been photographing immigrants and the hardship and heartbreak of crossing the U.S.-Mexico border for years — but this time, he said, something is different.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer for Getty Images said the Trump administration’s policy of separating children from their parents — part of its “zero tolerance” stance toward people who illegally cross into the U.S. — has changed everything about enforcement at the U.S.-Mexico border and resulted in a level of despair for immigrants that Americans can no longer ignore.

“It’s a very different scene now,” he said. “I’m almost positive these families last week had no idea they’d be separated from their children.”

Moore’s image last week of a 2-year-old Honduran girl crying as a U.S. Border Patrol agent patted down her mother has become a symbol of the human cost — and many critics say cruelty — of President Donald Trump’s hard line on immigration. The crying girl has become the face of the family separation policy, which has been criticized by Democrats and Republicans alike.

“When the officer told the mother to put her child down for the body search, I could see this look in the little girl’s eyes,” Moore told TIME. “As soon as her feet touched the ground she began to scream.”

Moore said the girl’s mother had a weariness in her eyes as she was stopped by Border Patrol agents. The father of three said his years of experience did not inoculate him from feeling intense emotions as he watched agents allowed the mother to pick up her child and loaded them both into a van. But, he said, he knew he had to keep photographing the scene.

“This one was tough for me. As soon as it was over, they were put into a van. I had to stop and take deep breaths,” he said. “All I wanted to do was pick her up. But I couldn’t.”

More than 2,000 children have been taken away from their parents since April, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced at “zero tolerance” policy that refers all cases of illegal entry at the border for prosecution. The Trump administration has said Border Patrol agents separate children from parents because children cannot be locked up for the crimes of their mothers and fathers.

A Honduran mother holds her two-year-old as U.S. Border Patrol as agents review their papers near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018. The asylum seekers had rafted across the Rio Grande from Mexico and were detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents before being sent to a processing center for possible separation.
A Honduran mother holds her two-year-old as U.S. Border Patrol as agents review their papers near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018. The asylum seekers had rafted across the Rio Grande from Mexico and were detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents before being sent to a processing center for possible separation.
John Moore—Getty Images
A U.S. Border Patrol spotlight shines on a terrified mother and son from Honduras as they are found in the dark near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018.
A U.S. Border Patrol spotlight shines on a terrified mother and son from Honduras as they are found in the dark near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018.
John Moore—Getty Images
U.S. Border Patrol agents detain a group of Central American asylum seekers near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018.
U.S. Border Patrol agents detain a group of Central American asylum seekers near the U.S.-Mexico border in McAllen, Texas on June 12, 2018.
John Moore—Getty Images

Moore has followed immigrant families and enforcement efforts since 2014 and recently published a book of some of his most stirring photographs, Undocumented: Immigration and the Militarization of the United States-Mexico Border. He said despite the tough new policy, immigrants are not likely to lose the determination that drives them to make the dangerous journey to the United States.

“It’s been very easy for Americans to ignore over the years the desperation that people have to have a better life,” Moore said. “They often leave with their children with their shirts on their backs.”

A boy from Honduras watches a movie at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patrol in McAllen, Tex. on Sept. 8, 2014.
A boy from Honduras watches a movie at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patrol in McAllen, Tex. on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images

Footage released Monday of a detention facility where families arrested at the border and children taken from their parents are held echo a photo Moore took in 2014 of a Honduran child watching Casper in the same facility, alone except for a guard keeping watch. That photo, taken at the same detention center in McCallen, Texas where children are now being grouped inside cages, has stayed with Moore over the years.

While he is not sure if that boy was an unaccompanied minor or what happened to him, he said many of the other children at the facility were without their parents. “That picture is still haunting for me.”

Most of the photos below come from Moore’s 2018 book, published by powerHouse Books.

Families attend a memorial service for two boys who were kidnapped and killed in San Juan Sacatepequez, Guatemala on Feb. 14, 2017. More than 2,000 people walked in a funeral procession for Oscar Armando Top Cotzajay, 11, and Carlos Daniel Xiqin, 10 who were abducted walking to school Friday morning when they were abducted.
Families attend a memorial service for two boys who were kidnapped and killed in San Juan Sacatepequez, Guatemala on Feb. 14, 2017. More than 2,000 people walked in a funeral procession for Oscar Armando Top Cotzajay, 11, and Carlos Daniel Xiqin, 10 who were abducted walking to school Friday morning when they were abducted.
John Moore—Getty Images
Sonia Morales massages the back of her son Jose Issac Morales, 11, at the door of their one-room home in San Pedro Sula, Honduras on Aug. 20, 2017. The mother of three said that her son's spinal deformation began at age four, but has never been able to afford the $6,000 surgery to correct his spinal condition. The boy's father, Issac Morales, 30, said he tried to immigrate to the U.S. in 2016 to work and send money home but was picked up by U.S. Border Patrol officers in the Arizona desert and deported back to Honduras.
Sonia Morales massages the back of her son Jose Issac Morales, 11, at the door of their one-room home in San Pedro Sula, Honduras on Aug. 20, 2017. The mother of three said that her son's spinal deformation began at age four, but has never been able to afford the $6,000 surgery to correct his spinal condition. The boy's father, Issac Morales, 30, said he tried to immigrate to the U.S. in 2016 to work and send money home but was picked up by U.S. Border Patrol officers in the Arizona desert and deported back to Honduras.
John Moore—Getty Images
An Indigenous family walks from Guatemala into Mexico after illegally crossing the border at the Suchiate River in Talisman, Mexico on Aug. 1, 2013.
An Indigenous family walks from Guatemala into Mexico after illegally crossing the border at the Suchiate River in Talisman, Mexico on Aug. 1, 2013.
John Moore—Getty Images
Undocumented immigrant families walk before being taken into custody by Border Patrol agents near McAllen, Texas on July 21, 2014.
Undocumented immigrant families walk before being taken into custody by Border Patrol agents near McAllen, Texas on July 21, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
Families of Central American immigrants, including Lorena Arriaga, 27, and her son Jason Ramirez, 7, from El Salvador, turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents after crossing the Rio Grande River from Mexico to Mission, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
Families of Central American immigrants, including Lorena Arriaga, 27, and her son Jason Ramirez, 7, from El Salvador, turn themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol agents after crossing the Rio Grande River from Mexico to Mission, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
Immigrants from Central America wait to be taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents in Roma, Texas on August 17, 2016.
Immigrants from Central America wait to be taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents in Roma, Texas on August 17, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
U.S. Border Patrol agents take undocumented immigrants into custody after capturing them after they crossed Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas near Sullivan City, Texas on Aug. 18, 2016.
U.S. Border Patrol agents take undocumented immigrants into custody after capturing them after they crossed Rio Grande from Mexico into Texas near Sullivan City, Texas on Aug. 18, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
Undocumented immigrants are led after being caught and handcuffed by Border Patrol agents near the U.S.-Mexico border in Weslaco, Texas on April 13, 2016.
Undocumented immigrants are led after being caught and handcuffed by Border Patrol agents near the U.S.-Mexico border in Weslaco, Texas on April 13, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
Women and children sit in a holding cell at a U.S. Border Patrol processing center after being detained by agents near the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
Women and children sit in a holding cell at a U.S. Border Patrol processing center after being detained by agents near the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
Women and children wait in a holding cell at a U.S. Border Patrol processing center after being detained by agents near the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
Women and children wait in a holding cell at a U.S. Border Patrol processing center after being detained by agents near the U.S.-Mexico border near McAllen, Texas on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
A girl from Central America rests on thermal blankets at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patro in McAllen, Texasl on Sept. 8, 2014.
A girl from Central America rests on thermal blankets at a detention facility run by the U.S. Border Patro in McAllen, Texasl on Sept. 8, 2014.
John Moore—Getty Images
Donated clothing await immigrants at the Catholic Sacred Heart Church Immigrant Respite Center from McAllen, Texas on Aug. 15, 2016.
Donated clothing await immigrants at the Catholic Sacred Heart Church Immigrant Respite Center from McAllen, Texas on Aug. 15, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
A detained Mexican immigrant [L) visits with his wife and children at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility in Florence, Ariz on July 30, 2010.
A detained Mexican immigrant (L) visits with his wife and children at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility in Florence, Ariz on July 30, 2010.
John Moore—Getty Images
Immigrants from Central America await transport from the U.S. Border Patrol in Roma, Texas on Aug. 17, 2016.
Immigrants from Central America await transport from the U.S. Border Patrol in Roma, Texas on Aug. 17, 2016.
John Moore—Getty Images
Central American immigrant families depart ICE custody, pending future immigration court hearings in McAllen, Texas on June 11, 2018.
Central American immigrant families depart ICE custody, pending future immigration court hearings in McAllen, Texas on June 11, 2018.
John Moore—Getty Images

Correction: The original version of this story misstated what happened to the girl in the photo after she taken from the scene. The girl was not carried away screaming by U.S. Border Patrol agents; her mother picked her up and the two were taken away together.

Their cases should be properly adjudicated and if it's an issue of crimes and gangs at home, the US should help the Govts set up safe zones in their homeland to house them until the security issues in stabilized.  For all other cases, they should be returned home and go through the official visa application process.

Trump could propose a guess worker program and have the adults included so they come legally and work and return home seasonally.  No need to drag their entire families in search of work!

Nehru posted:

They are NOT Orangutans, they need their Families with them

Absolutely, that is why POTUS signed an EO to keep families together even through the testing/investigation period.  He even proposed returning (those who will be returned) together.  So parents and kids will not be separated.

POTUS is very caring!

Guest workers' programs which included the Bracero Program, exist in the US_of_A since World War II.

The guest workers work in the US_of_A for the designate period; return to their country to then return to the US_of_A for the next year's season.

Similar programs exist in Canada.

Well, he cannot please everyone.  People say that about Burnham, people say that about BJ.  It all depends on how you see things!

Someone told me not to fight with anyone here, we will never agree, just give your point of view and let it be.  I will take that advise.

Demerara_Guy posted:

Guest workers' programs which included the Bracero Program, exist in the US_of_A since World War II.

The guest workers work in the US_of_A for the designate period; return to their country to then return to the US_of_A for the next year's season.

Similar programs exist in Canada.

Good, so no need to come illegally.  Get into that program!

People seeking permanent opportunities in another country exist for centuries and will continue forever.

One simply need to follow the current issues in countries like Germany and other European countries, to name a few, which offer opportunities for the families to live, work and remain in the country.

Demerara_Guy posted:

People seeking permanent opportunities in another country exist for centuries and will continue forever.

One simply need to follow the current issues in countries like Germany and other European countries, to name a few, which offer opportunities for the families to live, work and remain in the country.

True, just like many of us came, legally!

Baseman posted:
Demerara_Guy posted:

People seeking permanent opportunities in another country exist for centuries and will continue forever.

One simply need to follow the current issues in countries like Germany and other European countries, to name a few, which offer opportunities for the families to live, work and remain in the country.

True, just like many of us came, legally!

The issue relates to individuals without permits, visas, etc.,  seeking opportunities in another country.

The comment relate to what is done in numerous countries; Germany and other European countries as an example.

Demerara_Guy posted:

Guest workers' programs which included the Bracero Program, exist in the US_of_A since World War II.

The guest workers work in the US_of_A for the designate period; return to their country to then return to the US_of_A for the next year's season.

Similar programs exist in Canada.

These people have no interest in any program where they have to work.  It's much easier to cross the border, disappear into the general population and get on a benefits program.  These people know the laws of America better than me and you.  They know that they can show up at any hospital in the US and get free healthcare.  They know that hundreds of them name Jose Hernandez and US authorities can't find them as they assimilate into various neighborhoods.  This has been going on for decades.  They have figured out how to cheat the system.  They can buy you and sell you for two pesos and you won't even know.

When it comes to children it becomes sentimental. Photographers and the media understand what grasp people's attention. People who are looking at these pictures and reading the awful stories are designed to put people to clash with the president in the center of national controversy. This is a media witch-hunt to make believe Trump hates illegal immigrants and their children. Unfortunately, the anti-Trump opportunists feed on the sentimental fallacies that give rise to their cause. On the flip side, the illegal parents are causing this to happen to their children but that doesn't count. Does it?  There are so many countries including Canada and Mexico that can make their journey easier from monstrous America. Why only America? America has immigration policies, laws, rules, and regulation to follow. Why do people think America is cowboy country? What happens to Mexico that let all these people enter their country to reach America's border? Don't they have laws in Mexico?

Bibi Haniffa posted:
Demerara_Guy posted:

Guest workers' programs which included the Bracero Program, exist in the US_of_A since World War II.

The guest workers work in the US_of_A for the designate period; return to their country to then return to the US_of_A for the next year's season.

Similar programs exist in Canada.

These people have no interest in any program where they have to work.  It's much easier to cross the border, disappear into the general population and get on a benefits program.  These people know the laws of America better than me and you.  They know that they can show up at any hospital in the US and get free healthcare.  They know that hundreds of them name Jose Hernandez and US authorities can't find them as they assimilate into various neighborhoods.  This has been going on for decades.  They have figured out how to cheat the system.  They can buy you and sell you for two pesos and you won't even know.

Donald Trump Paid $1.4 Million in a Dispute Over Undocumented Workers. Read the Newly Unsealed Legal Papers

By Ryan Teague Beckwith, November 28, 2017, http://time.com/5039109/donald...tower-bonwit-teller/

Donald Trump quietly paid $1.4 million in 1998 to settle a class-action lawsuit that alleged he stiffed a union pension fund by employing undocumented Polish laborers to demolish a department store to make way for Trump Tower.

The amount became public this week after a judge released previously sealed settlement documents in response to a motion filed by Time Inc. and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press in 2016.

“This Order shall remain confidential in accordance with the parties’ agreement at the October 26, 1998 settlement conference,” reads the settlement agreement, which was signed on Dec. 30, 1998, by District Court Judge Thomas P. Griesa of New York’s Southern District.

The case originated in the summer of 1980, when Trump was under pressure to finish the demolition of the Bonwit Teller building on Fifth Avenue in New York City so that he could begin construction on his signature project, the Trump Tower.

As noted in an Aug. 25, 2016, story in TIME, Trump hired a group of undocumented Polish laborers who put in “12-hour shifts with inadequate safety equipment at subpar wages that their contractor paid sporadically, if at all.”

Their hiring led to years-long litigation that Trump finally settled in 1998.

Read the plaintiffs’ memoranda in support of a settlement, the notice of a motion on the case, a transcript of a conference on the settlement and the settlement below.

Most of the people in holding centers came through the desert.  I saw one lawyer claiming his illegal alien client did try a port of entry but her asylum case was rejected.  So she then used a coyote to smuggle her and her young kids into the US.  Now she claiming asylum and have a taxpayer-paid lawyer to fight her case.

This is why that wall is needed.

Prince posted:
yuji22 posted:

I have one question. Was this law in place when Obama was in office ? If so, what did he do about it ?

Honest answers please.

The law was passed in 1997 under Bill Clinton admin.

Then this proves that the Democrats are a bunch of hypocrites.

yuji22 posted:
Prince posted:
yuji22 posted:

I have one question. Was this law in place when Obama was in office ? If so, what did he do about it ?

Honest answers please.

The law was passed in 1997 under Bill Clinton admin.

Then this proves that the Democrats are a bunch of hypocrites.

They overthrew the PPP (Dr. Jagan) and was responsible for the PNC robbing the PPP in 2015. How is the recount going? Where is the white gay Fatboy Hunt? Is he at McDonald's drive-thru ordering a few dozen cheeseburgers?

skeldon_man posted:
yuji22 posted:
Prince posted:
yuji22 posted:

I have one question. Was this law in place when Obama was in office ? If so, what did he do about it ?

Honest answers please.

The law was passed in 1997 under Bill Clinton admin.

Then this proves that the Democrats are a bunch of hypocrites.

They overthrew the PPP (Dr. Jagan) and was responsible for the PNC robbing the PPP in 2015. How is the recount going? Where is the white gay Fatboy Hunt? Is he at McDonald's drive-thru ordering a few dozen cheeseburgers?

Fat Boy accomplished his mission. He is now stuffing his face.

Baseman posted:

Well, he cannot please everyone.  People say that about Burnham, people say that about BJ.  It all depends on how you see things!

Someone told me not to fight with anyone here, we will never agree, just give your point of view and let it be.  I will take that advise.

That person must be saying now that you are such a wuss.

Leonora posted:
ksazma posted:

Base, how much koolaid does one have to drink to be fooled into thinking that Trump is caring?

Donald will make Base the Maharaja of the Trump Mahal in Bedminster, NJ. 

Hey Leonora, I deh in yuh neck a de woods. Wedding in Fairfax

Demerara Guy,

With all your prolific posting skills, how did you miss the correction to the article you posted? The Washington Post issued a correction to the "fake news" you posted to rile up the crowd. The child shown and the mother were never separated or put in any "detention camp". If you were interested in truth and not posting out of some malicious agenda you would have noted the correction and posted it.

https://www.washingtonpost.com...m_term=.d957a0fac55f

Baseman posted:

Most of the people in holding centers came through the desert.  I saw one lawyer claiming his illegal alien client did try a port of entry but her asylum case was rejected.  So she then used a coyote to smuggle her and her young kids into the US.  Now she claiming asylum and have a taxpayer-paid lawyer to fight her case.

This is why that wall is needed.

That wall is big business for the Trump family. His daughter and son-in-law  earned over 87M$. How about you?

ksazma posted:
Leonora posted:
ksazma posted:

Base, how much koolaid does one have to drink to be fooled into thinking that Trump is caring?

Donald will make Base the Maharaja of the Trump Mahal in Bedminster, NJ. 

Hey Leonora, I deh in yuh neck a de woods. Wedding in Fairfax

Enjoy and I hope you tour DC. Spin by the White House and cuss Trump.   I've been super busy, we'll meet next time. 

Time defends cover with viral photo of crying immigrant girl

http://thehill.com/sites/default/files/styles/thumb_small_article/public/timecover_trumpmigrantgirl.jpg?itok=2C9XFhY8

Time magazine is defending a cover that critics claim inaccurately depicts a migrant child as being separated from her parents, insisting the "cover and our reporting capture the stakes of this moment."

“The June 12 photograph of the 2-year-old Honduran girl became the most visible symbol of the ongoing immigration debate in America for a reason,” a Time spokesman said in a statement provided to CNN on Friday.

“Under the policy enforced by the administration, prior to its reversal this week, those who crossed the border illegally were criminally prosecuted, which in turn resulted in the separation of children and parents," the spokesman added. "Our cover and our reporting capture the stakes of this moment."

The latest issue of Time shows a cover illustrated with President Trump looking at a 2-year old crying girl, with a caption reading "Welcome to America."

It quickly went viral amid media coverage of the administration's policy of separating children from parents awaiting prosecution for crossing the border illegally. Approximately 2,300 migrant children have been affected by the policy, which Trump halted with an executive order on Wednesday.

The father of the girl in the photograph, though, said in a Thursday interview that she was never separated from her mother. He said the child was only briefly kept aside to allow border agents to conduct a pat-down of the parent. It was also reported on Friday that the mother was deported in 2013, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. 

Conservatives slammed the cover after it was revealed the parents were never separated from their child, calling it another example of "fake news" and liberal bias.

Leonora posted:
ksazma posted:

Hey Leonora, I deh in yuh neck a de woods. Wedding in Fairfax

Enjoy and I hope you tour DC. Spin by the White House and cuss Trump.   I've been super busy, we'll meet next time. 

Actually we don’t plan to cross over into DC. The walima is this afternoon. The nikah was yesterday just before midday and we all gathered at my sister’s home (groom’s mom) Friday night. It has been a busying time since we got here Friday. We plan to drive to NYC some time after lunch tomorrow where we will be until flying home Wednesday night. Short vacation because the girl has school on Thursday. But regardless, it will still be memorable.

Lastly, Trump is the biggest skont

ksazma posted:
Leonora posted:
ksazma posted:

Hey Leonora, I deh in yuh neck a de woods. Wedding in Fairfax

Enjoy and I hope you tour DC. Spin by the White House and cuss Trump.   I've been super busy, we'll meet next time. 

Actually we don’t plan to cross over into DC. The walima is this afternoon. The nikah was yesterday just before midday and we all gathered at my sister’s home (groom’s mom) Friday night. It has been a busying time since we got here Friday. We plan to drive to NYC some time after lunch tomorrow where we will be until flying home Wednesday night. Short vacation because the girl has school on Thursday. But regardless, it will still be memorable.

Lastly, Trump is the biggest skont

Just an update. I did end up in DC last night to pick my daughter up from a Harry Styles concert.

Add Reply

Likes (0)

×
×
×
×
×