Skip to main content

October 17 ,2020

Source

Kaieteur News – Parika yesterday suffered flooding as the Spring tide caused water from the river to seep onto the roads, displacing several vendors and other businesspeople, with water inundating the central traffic junction of the area. Kaieteur News was told that persons living on the Parika beach area near the stelling saw their homes flooded.
According to government, the worst is yet to come, with other areas along the coast in danger of being flooded out over the next few days. The Ministry of Public Works is warning certain areas to take precautions, namely the Pomeroon River Banks; San Souci to Sarah and Maria’s Pleasure to Meerzorg; Good Success; Zeelandia and Moorfarm; Wakenaam Island, Cane Field/Retrieve; Endeavour/Blenheim; Cane Garden – Leguan Island; Windsor Forest to DeWillem (West Coast Demerara); Zeelugt; Parika Market Area; Salem to Sparta (East Bank Essequibo); Water Street, Georgetown; Helena #1 and #2, Mahaica; Belvedere to Cottage, Mahaicony; Wellington Park/Tarlogie; Lonsdale/Glasgow (East Bank Berbice); and Sheet Anchor, Canje River.
The highest tide is expected today around between 4:30pm and 5:08pm, reaching a height of 3.36 metres. Government expects the high tides to last until October 19.

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Guyana coast land is about 6 feet below sea level and it is extremely expensive to build much higher sea defense works.

Sea walls in Guyana are built with about a 1:10 to 1:20 probability of occurrence. That means that there is about 10% to 5% probability that flooding will occur in any year.

Also, Guyana is subject to influence of the Amazon and Orinoco rivers which cause erratic erosion and flooding along the coast land.

This is a taste of what's to come.  Higher walls will not be able to keep the water out.  Global warming is causing havoc on the planet.  It is going to get worse.  That oil that Exxon in pumping off the coast of Guyana once burnt will only add to the problem.  Isn't it ironic that the potential windfall that some are celebrating may in reality contribute to the country's downfall.   Sensible people shouldn't build at Mahaica beach.  They should build on high ground.   

@Totaram posted:

This is a taste of what's to come.  Higher walls will not be able to keep the water out.  Global warming is causing havoc on the planet.  It is going to get worse.  That oil that Exxon in pumping off the coast of Guyana once burnt will only add to the problem.  Isn't it ironic that the potential windfall that some are celebrating may in reality contribute to the country's downfall.   Sensible people shouldn't build at Mahaica beach.  They should build on high ground.   

How will the burnt oil contribute to flooding?

@VishMahabir posted:

How will the burnt oil contribute to flooding?

Burning oil releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, contributing to the warming of our planet. In 2013, petroleum accounted for 41 percent of the U.S.’s carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels.

In order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, scientists say the world cannot afford to burn more than one-third of known oil reserves.

Knucklehead:

@Mitwah posted:

Burning oil releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, contributing to the warming of our planet. In 2013, petroleum accounted for 41 percent of the U.S.’s carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels.

In order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, scientists say the world cannot afford to burn more than one-third of known oil reserves.

Knucklehead:

Thanks for explaining Mitwah.  I thought this was common knowledge.  If Vish doesn't know this how about Uncle Goberdhan from Topu?

Please note that on the list of places on flood watch  in the KN article are Helena#1 &2, Mahaica.  These places are a bit inland on the Western bank of the Mahaica River.  This means that the river is expected to overtop its banks. Would the highly simplistic notion of building higher seawalls help or exacerbate the problem in areas like Helena #1 &2 ? 

Uncle Goberdhan at Topu might be slightly safer  than people from Belvedere, who are closer to the ocean and experienced frequent flooding with even rainfall.

It is frightening and photographic to see some kokers completely surrounded by the ocean and global warming don't seem to be at its peak.   

@Tola posted:

Uncle Goberdhan at Topu might be slightly safer  than people from Belvedere, who are closer to the ocean and experienced frequent flooding with even rainfall.

It is frightening and photographic to see some kokers completely surrounded by the ocean and global warming don't seem to be at its peak.   

When we were little and attending Sunday School, a favorite bible song was 'The wise man built his house upon the rock, the foolish man built his house upon the sand, the rain came down, and the floods came up, the wise man's house stood firm, the foolish man's house went splat!'       

Last edited by Athena
@Totaram posted:

Please note that on the list of places on flood watch  in the KN article are Helena#1 &2, Mahaica.  These places are a bit inland on the Western bank of the Mahaica River.  This means that the river is expected to overtop its banks. Would the highly simplistic notion of building higher seawalls help or exacerbate the problem in areas like Helena #1 &2 ?

These places are not inland. They are on both sides of the road and borders the river.

@Athena posted:

When we were little and attending Sunday School, a favorite bible song was 'The wise man built his house upon the rock, the foolish man built his house upon the sand, the rain came down, and the floods came up, the wise man's house stood firm, the foolish man's house went splat!'       

I read that story to my grandkids before bed. Dah is the story where the big bad wolf does Huff N puff an blow the lil pig grass house down but nah nah nah, not the brick one, he stay safe.

Last edited by cain
@Athena posted:

When we were little and attending Sunday School, a favorite bible song was 'The wise man built his house upon the rock, the foolish man built his house upon the sand, the rain came down, and the floods came up, the wise man's house stood firm, the foolish man's house went splat!'       

...na '...the foolish man's house fall flat like a doseh roti !'

Come to think of it, doseh roti of flour and water, with sugar sometimes added, is a poor man's breakfast. But eaten with guava jam is very delicious.

Decades ago I made a round tower or metal to bake roti that is stored flat in a cupboard. Recently I was asked why it had a hole on the handle and it was to hang on a nail in a logie kitchen. The handle hole is not required for its present storage, but it was automatically done when the tower was made. Anyone know why its called a tower ?

It is the same reason a lady was asked why she cut the ends of a roast before placing it in  a baking pan.  She said she learn it from her mother, who also learnt it from her mother. When the grandmother was asked why she did it, she said her baking pan was too small.  But the existing pan was not small.

We sometimes follow what other family members did in our homes and automatically do it ourselves, without question.   

@Ramakant-P posted:

The PNC had 5 1/2 years to build the seawall but didn't. Now watch the PPP at work.  Parika will be more beautiful than ever.

The PPP had 23 1/2 years to build it. They squatted in office.

Add Reply

Post