Shockingly, China’s Wet Markets are Reopening; Will We Ever Learn?

Reports show China's wet markets, which scientists believe triggered the coronavirus pandemic, have reopened after relaxed lockdown measures.

 
  • Fox and Daily Mail report wet markets in China, which are suspected to be the origin of coronavirus, are reopening.
  • Studies dating back to 2007 have described wet markets and bat consumption as a “time bomb” for a virus outbreak.
  • Authorities have to restrict wet markets to prevent new outbreaks, at least until the coronavirus pandemic subsides.

Wet markets in China have reportedly reopened after easing of lockdown measures across several cities. Studies dating back to 2007 have suggested that wet markets and the consumption of bats are a “time bomb” for a coronavirus outbreak.

Tucker Carlson said:

Wild animal wet markets have long been recognized as a major pandemic threat. As coronavirus spread, China announced it would crackdown on them obviously, but it looks like the crackdown didn’t last long.

With scientists pointing towards the Chinese horseshoe bat as the likely origin of coronavirus, the resumption of consuming and capturing bats poses a threat of the continuous spread of the virus.

The markets have gone back to operating in exactly the same way as they did before coronavirus…The only difference is that security guards try to stop anyone taking pictures which would never have happened before.

Bat Eating And Wet Markets Must Be Stopped To Prevent Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic is en route to impose possibly the worst recession in the U.S.and in the global economy since the Great Depression in 1929.

The U.S. stocks have recovered through aggressive fiscal policies, but the threat to manufacturing, retail, and other major industries across the U.S., Europe, and even China place the world at risk of a prolonged economic downturn.

To prevent another coronavirus outbreak from occurring in the future, it is critical to eliminate practices that are suspected to have led to the virus outbreak.

" alt="" />Bat, Bat guano,
Bat guano collectors fill bag outside of a bat cave at Wat Khao Chong Phran in Ratchaburi, Thailand March 14, 2020. | Source: REUTERS/Juarawee Kittisilpa

As CCN.com reported, in 2007, Clinical Microbiology Reviews Journal released a study detailing the possibility of a SARS-like epidemic reemerging in the future as a result of the viruses contained in bats.

 https://www.ccn.com/shockingly...-will-we-ever-learn/

Last edited by Former Member
Original Post

Chinese wet markets that unleashed coronavirus on globe have reopened — and they're still selling bats

'The markets have gone back to operating in exactly the same way as they did before coronavirus'

As the coronavirus pandemic ravages the world, China has reportedly reopened its infamous wet markets.

Wet markets are distinguished from dry markets by the selling of fresh meat, produce, and other perishable items. However, China's wet markets are notorious because exotic animals are often sold in unsanitary conditions.

In fact, the COVID-19 outbreak has been traced back to a Wuhan wet market. Horseshoe bats and exotic mammals, such as civets and pangolins, which act as hosts to the dangerous viruses that bats carry, are often sold at these markets and consumed by local Chinese people.

But that hasn't convinced China to permanently shut down the markets.

According to the Daily Mail, wet markets have reopened across China after China's communist government publicly declared victory over COVID-19.

At one market in Guilin, a southern Chinese city, a Daily Mail correspondent watched as cats and dogs were waiting to be sold for their meat.

 

At another market in Dongguan, a second Daily Mail correspondent photographed signs advertising the sale of bats, scorpions, snakes, lizards, and other exotic wild animals.

"Everyone here believes the outbreak is over and there's nothing to worry about any more. It's just a foreign problem now as far as they are concerned," one of the correspondents said.

The Dongguan correspondent reported that the markets are operating just as they were before the COVID-19 outbreak — except now security is stopping people from taking pictures.

"The markets have gone back to operating in exactly the same way as they did before coronavirus," the Dongguan correspondent said. "The only difference is that security guards try to stop anyone taking pictures which would never have happened before."

The Associated Press reported in February:

SARS and the current outbreak of COVID-19 are not the only diseases in people traced back to animals. The killing and sale of what is known as bushmeat in Africa is thought to be a source for Ebola. Bird flu likely came from chickens at a market in Hong Kong in 1997. Measles is believed to have evolved from a virus that infected cattle.

Scientists have not yet determined exactly how the new coronavirus first infected people. Evidence suggests it originated in bats, which infected another animal that spread it to people at a market in the southeastern city of Wuhan. The now-shuttered Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market advertised dozens of species such as giant salamanders, baby crocodiles and raccoon dogs that were often referred to as wildlife, even when they were farmed.

Chinese President Xi Jinping vowed in February to "resolutely outlaw and harshly crack down" on the illegal exotic wildlife trade in China — just as China did in the wake of the SARS outbreak nearly two decades ago — but it appears the promise was hallow.

https://www.theblaze.com/news/...e-still-selling-bats

China's Wuhan Coronavirus Spreads To Macau
China's Wuhan Coronavirus Spreads To Macau

Chinese wet markets still selling bats

Warning: Graphic

As new cases of the coronavirus continue to decline in China, thousands of people have started to flood back into controversial wet markets across the country.

The city of Wuhan, which has been considered ground zero for the virus outbreak, has started to reopen after being placed on a strict two-month lockdown.

RELATED: 'Dob them in' plea as 1100 tourists defy lockdown

The virus was detected in December and is thought to have originated in a market in the city that sold wild animals for human consumption.

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A number of animals, including bats and the highly endangered pangolin, have been identified as possible culprits for the virus.

The Wuhan Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market was shut down in January and in February China declared an immediate and "comprehensive" ban on the trade and consumption of wild animals.

RELATED: Nurses spat at amid COVID-19 hysteria

Wuhan’s Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, a ‘wet market’ where exotic animals are kept alive in cages, and butchered for meat before it was shut down.
Wuhan’s Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, a ‘wet market’ where exotic animals are kept alive in cages, and butchered for meat before it was shut down.

But it appears the recent COVID-19 outbreak has done little deter other animal markets across the country from continuing to trade.

A medicine seller at a market in Dongguan, southern China, was seen advertising bats, snakes, lizards and toads to assist with common ailments, the Daily Mail reported.

"The markets have gone back to operating in exactly the same way as they did before coronavirus," a correspondent to visited the market told the publication.

RELATED: Months until coronavirus measures lifted

"The only difference is that security guards try to stop anyone taking pictures, which would never have happened before."

Another market in Guilin, in southwest China, was full of cats and dogs crammed into cages in filthy conditions and available for slaughter.

Similar markets are seen in various locations across Asia and have long been condemned, not only for their cruel treatment of animals, but for their unhygienic conditions.

RELATED: Furious doctors: 'For God's sake stay at home'

 

There are about several stalls in every wet market in Guilin, trading in different species of dogs – live and dead – including Chinese rural dogs and pet-like dogs. Picture: David Wong/South China Morning Post via Getty Images
There are about several stalls in every wet market in Guilin, trading in different species of dogs – live and dead – including Chinese rural dogs and pet-like dogs. Picture: David Wong/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

 

This isn't the first virus that has been linked to wet markets, with the SARS outbreak in 2003 also thought to have originated there.

A study published in 2007 from researchers at the University of Hong Kong described the culture of eating at these wet markets as a "time bomb" for a new virus.

"Coronaviruses are well known to undergo genetic recombination, which may lead to new genotypes and outbreaks," the paper read.

"The presence of a large reservoir of SARS-CoV-like viruses in horseshoe bats, together with the culture of eating exotic mammals in southern China, is a time bomb."

RELATED: New Aussie booze restrictions to control stockpiling

At the peak of the virus outbreak in Wuhan the city was recording thousands of new cases a day.

Since then more than 721,000 cases have been confirmed worldwide and the death toll has soared past 33,900.

China has now claimed it has been successful in suppressing the virus, with the US and Italy taking over as the countries with the most confirmed cases.

Originally published as Chinese wet markets still selling bats

https://www.dailymercury.com.a...elling-bats/3984833/

About ten years ago I was invited by a couple clients for dinner in a Chinese restaurant somewhere around Highway 7 Markham area. I walked in and noticed everything on the menu was in Chinese, I just told the couple I'll take a pass on it. Iman ain't eating a dam thing I doan know bout nor can pronounce, so I did like banana an split...taraaasss. 

It would be difficult to stop Chinese people to survive the way they know best. It's also difficult for the government to take control of people's eating habits of 1.3 billion people. No one knows exactly the cause of the corona outbreak. At the juncture we are in, fake news will steer people away from what they should be focused on. Let's survive this and wait for another. 

Pharaoh posted:

It would be difficult to stop Chinese people to survive the way they know best. It's also difficult for the government to take control of people's eating habits of 1.3 billion people. No one knows exactly the cause of the corona outbreak. At the juncture we are in, fake news will steer people away from what they should be focused on. Let's survive this and wait for another. 

Maybe you doan know what cause it but the rest ah we know. I bet you rass doan go ah Chinese food restaurant take out since.

Last edited by cain

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