Tola posted:
yuji22 posted:
kp posted:
yuji22 posted:
Dave posted:

Does Vish knows after 6 PM he enter his home the reverse way and don’t sweep the dust out the house after 6 PM. 

He rass better know about Jumbie and Obeah Man now. 

Moon Gazer  and Baccoo

Wait until he hears about (Berbician Fire Rass) and Village Master.

He will pee his pants if he reads one page of the IndraJal. This one is for real.

 Me did  not hear about  Village Master, but Old Albion had many Fire Rass, that suck blood on the neck from pregnant women, while they sleep.

They first had to remove their skin and hide it, before their Fire Rassing at night would wuk.

In our logie kitchen, we had  large jar of ground Balla Fire pepper, that was used to rub on the skin of the Fire  Rass.  Next day if we see a  person in our village with blisters on their skin, we will know they were a Fire Rass the night before.

In North America,  me did not see any  Fire Rass, but there were lots of blood sucking lawyers  and politicians.  

I heard New Yorkers mentioning Fire Rass. Never heard it being mentioned here, maybe Canada is too cold for them to exist. Regarding Village Master, villages along the Corentyne used to make an annual sacrifice for a Village Master (deceased Dutch Man). Practised by an older generation. I think that it is no longer practised.

My village had an old Dutch cemetery. 

Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:
kp posted:
Tola posted:

 

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

Growing up I always knew that as Methem or Metagee.

Metemgee is made with coconut milk. If we make it without the coconut milk, we call it dry food. I’ve heard people also call it hard food or you can fry it and call it boil and fry.

Most times we make metemgee, we use saltfish instead of meat.

We call it Boil and Fry. Fried salt fish, stew fish, or any curry with gravy goes well with it. 

Vish started his thread and disappeared. Did someone say he and Vishnu Mahadeo are the same? 

Leonora posted:
Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:
kp posted:
Tola posted:

 

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

Growing up I always knew that as Methem or Metagee.

Metemgee is made with coconut milk. If we make it without the coconut milk, we call it dry food. I’ve heard people also call it hard food or you can fry it and call it boil and fry.

Most times we make metemgee, we use saltfish instead of meat.

We call it Boil and Fry. Fried salt fish, stew fish, or any curry with gravy goes well with it. 

Vish started his thread and disappeared. Did someone say he and Vishnu Mahadeo are the same? 

No they aren't, I know Vishnu Mahadeo and his parents long, long time ago.

Baseman posted:

Isn’t Vishnu Mahadeo that Banna wuh dozz give out free water drums every year?  Me thinks he is some socialite personality in Queens!!

Yes. I saw him on my cousin's facebook, maybe we're related. 

There are two different personalities. One is acting as a dunce and the other as ignorant. 

Leonora posted:
cain posted:

Too many Vish's rass...gotta start numbering 'em. Vish1..Vish2

Someone said VishMahabir is Vijay Puran

I thought he was killed.

Mitwah posted:

There are two different personalities. One is acting as a dunce and the other as ignorant. 

Leonora posted:
cain posted:

Too many Vish's rass...gotta start numbering 'em. Vish1..Vish2

Someone said VishMahabir is Vijay Puran

I thought he was killed.

De man jumbie pan GNI.  

Leonora posted:
cain posted:

Too many Vish's rass...gotta start numbering 'em. Vish1..Vish2

Someone said VishMahabir is Vijay Puran. 

VJ Puran is a very bright man. He is  our age or bit older...probably in late fifties or early sixties now...an electrical engineer with a masters degree. He lives in Albany and work for the electrical grid in NY state.  His brother is the lawyer who died ( or was killed ) in Guyana...defended mainly drug people. VJ's only problem is he believes he is the new elite and the rest of us ought to pay homage....like stupid Ugli except brilliant.  

 

 

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice.

The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Iguana posted:
 

Y'all doan like Carib because he points out the racist, Hindutva supremacist shit.

Funny they call me a racist when in fact I point out the aspects of creole culture that has origins in India, words used daily, like pagalee.

To the Indo KKK those who don't subscribe to their Hindutva views are racists which is why they loved how Modi behaved before being the head of state forced him to become more moderate.

Iguana posted:
 

Sounds like a few of them here are from Corentyne.

The only part of Guyana that I am aware of where someone can live in an Indian enclave, without being a bigot will be certain villages on the Corentyne.  Not ECD, not WCD, not WCB and not the Essequibo Coast either.

caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

Iguana posted:
 To me, salt beef cookup was de best.

Pig tail for me.  They cook it in some of the islands too.  the salt meats being from slavery days as it was imported from Canada and added to the rice, corn meal or ground provision based diets of the enslaved people.

yuji22 posted:
 

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

Unless there is coconut milk it isn't cook up.  Its just peas and rice.

yuji22 posted:
 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

No they borrowed a different rice dish, just as blacks learned how curry and then later on to make roti/dhal puri.  Different way of cooking meats and  Guyana's first "fast food", good for lunch.

kp posted:
 

Berbicians  also put tomato sardine in their cook up.

Yes that brings it to the Joloff rice from the far western parts of West Africa.  This was probably brought in by the Kru, who were among the last Africans into BG, coming in after slavery ended.  They were originally brought in to grow rice.

yuji22 posted:

 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

Yes.  Cassava and corn are interested.  Brought in from the Americas to Europe and spreading to Africa, and then re-imported back to the Americas when the Africans enslaved peoples arrived.

yuji22 posted:
 

Based on what we eat, we owe our Afro Brothers and Sisters a big thank you. We are fortunate that we have we have Indo and Afro meals combined.

And also the Amerindian, British, Chinese and Portuguese influences.  No wonder some one asked why Guyanese food isn't more popular in NYC.

caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

Yes.  Cassava and corn are interested.  Brought in from the Americas to Europe and spreading to Africa, and then re-imported back to the Americas when the Africans enslaved peoples arrived.

Thanks Carib G.

kp posted:
 

Tell me what Drugb said was wrong,  he stated that Traditionally rice is an Asian food. Well what is wrong?  You pick something up from the Internet and post with out relevance. 

His implication was that its only when Indians arrived that rice was used in Guyanese cooking. 

If he wants to get technical then he needs to refer to SOUTHEAST Asia because this is where most tropical edible foods originated. Not India.  By the time the Americas was settled by Euro/African peoples these foods had spread from Africa to the far reaches of the Pacific and foods like coconuts even to the Americas, carried their by ocean currents.

Corn, taken to the Americas by Columbus, became a core part of the diet of Africans long before many of these peoples began to have sustained contact with Europeans.

yuji22 posted:
caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

Yes.  Cassava and corn are interested.  Brought in from the Americas to Europe and spreading to Africa, and then re-imported back to the Americas when the Africans enslaved peoples arrived.

Thanks Carib G.

You're welcome.  Good lessons I think for all of us.  Learned our prevalent cooking with coconut milk is.

caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:
 

Based on what we eat, we owe our Afro Brothers and Sisters a big thank you. We are fortunate that we have we have Indo and Afro meals combined.

And also the Amerindian, British, Chinese and Portuguese influences.  No wonder some one asked why Guyanese food isn't more popular in NYC.

Of course Guyanese are too low profile in NYC.  How many people know that there are more Guyanese in NYC than Haitians?

I can find upscale Jamaican influenced restaurants in NYC aimed at non Caribbean people.  I know a Guyanese woman who tried to do this in the 80s in the Village but her project failed as people didn't know what to expect and she lacked a liquor license. 

But with the vast repertoire of cultures that she had to draw from those who did go to the restaurant didn't want to leave.

caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

Yes.  Cassava and corn are interested.  Brought in from the Americas to Europe and spreading to Africa, and then re-imported back to the Americas when the Africans enslaved peoples arrived.

Why was cassava and corn had to be re imported when there is a consistent tradition of these products as the staple diet of native peoples from tierral del fuego to the north west of the Americas ( for corn)? There is no tradition of a break and a move to another product and a return to maize and cassava later?

caribny posted:
kp posted:
 

Tell me what Drugb said was wrong,  he stated that Traditionally rice is an Asian food. Well what is wrong?  You pick something up from the Internet and post with out relevance. 

His implication was that its only when Indians arrived that rice was used in Guyanese cooking. 

If he wants to get technical then he needs to refer to SOUTHEAST Asia because this is where most tropical edible foods originated. Not India.  By the time the Americas was settled by Euro/African peoples these foods had spread from Africa to the far reaches of the Pacific and foods like coconuts even to the Americas, carried their by ocean currents.

Corn, taken to the Americas by Columbus, became a core part of the diet of Africans long before many of these peoples began to have sustained contact with Europeans.

nah worry with drugb and he ignorance

corn is actually a New World crop taken by European colonizers/explorers to Europe/Africa/Asia after Columbus

same for the potato (aloo) which is native to Peru/Bolivia

Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:
kp posted:
Tola posted:

 

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

Growing up I always knew that as Methem or Metagee.

Metemgee is made with coconut milk. If we make it without the coconut milk, we call it dry food. I’ve heard people also call it hard food or you can fry it and call it boil and fry.

Most times we make metemgee, we use saltfish instead of meat.

I grew up vegetarian so my mother used to make metemgee for me. It is a simple dish. It needs starch for the thickener and fat for the flavor. The fat is usually provided by coconut milk ( butter and regular milk can be added according to the cooking techniques)_Starch is from root tubers....dasheen, eddoes, sweet cassava, tania etc. Ripe plantains are also used.   This is always the base with some salted meats ( pig tails or salted cod) are added. There are hundreds of recipe all beginning from th base of tubers for starch with  coconut milk, and added fats becoming distinctive by spices and meats. My mother used to add sautéed spinach in mine. 

D2 posted:
Leonora posted:
cain posted:

Too many Vish's rass...gotta start numbering 'em. Vish1..Vish2

Someone said VishMahabir is Vijay Puran. 

VJ Puran is a very bright man. He is  our age or bit older...probably in late fifties or early sixties now...an electrical engineer with a masters degree. He lives in Albany and work for the electrical grid in NY state.  His brother is the lawyer who died ( or was killed ) in Guyana...defended mainly drug people. VJ's only problem is he believes he is the new elite and the rest of us ought to pay homage....like stupid Ugli except brilliant.  

 

 

He is a poster on GNI and has identified himself on several occasions.

@Drugb

In 1992, I wrote an article on the history of the rice industry in Guyana. It appeared in "Farm World" magazine published by the Alesei Group of Companies. My research showed that rice cultivation was introduced by the Dutch in Essequibo in the 18th century. The original seed paddy was imported from North Carolina. The Dutch used African slave labour for rice cultivation in their Essequibo plantations.

Later, after slavery ended, after East Indians had completed their indentured contracts and got their own land, rice cultivation accelerated and made Guyana a rice EXPORTING colony.

In a nutshell, Afro labour started the local rice industry; Indos produced a surplus for export.

Bibi Haniffa posted:
D2 posted:
Leonora posted:
cain posted:

Too many Vish's rass...gotta start numbering 'em. Vish1..Vish2

Someone said VishMahabir is Vijay Puran. 

VJ Puran is a very bright man. He is  our age or bit older...probably in late fifties or early sixties now...an electrical engineer with a masters degree. He lives in Albany and work for the electrical grid in NY state.  His brother is the lawyer who died ( or was killed ) in Guyana...defended mainly drug people. VJ's only problem is he believes he is the new elite and the rest of us ought to pay homage....like stupid Ugli except brilliant.  

 

 

He is a poster on GNI and has identified himself on several occasions.

He has been here from the beginning ( 1997) and never posts under an alias as that is something he is fervently  against. His profile is still active. 

caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years"

https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdf

We note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan.

Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

Iguana posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years"

https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdf

We note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan.

Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

Teach them bhai, they think the dealing with mediocre. There was a thread on rice on GNI.

Django posted:
Iguana posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years"

https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdf

We note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan.

Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

Teach them bhai, they think the dealing with mediocre. There was a thread on rice on GNI.

You need some Dhal.

Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

i recall as a lil bai feeling for fish with my cousins in the flooded rice field

we would advance in a horizontal line picking up mud and spraying it up ahead to blind the fish as we feel out and grab them . . . mostly tilapia

and yes, hunting for buck crab was the most exciting/exotic on the coastal mud flats in WCB especially since they were such a delicacy . . . cooked in coconut milk, yesss bai

me nat only live in town

Rice is grown in Africa.  During  water drilling projects, oxen and ploughs were given to  farmers to grown their food, including rice. 

American slaves who might come from the same place as Guyanese slaves, took their traditions and food  where they were taken.   Cook-up is not only a Guyanese food.

We have a story telling club called Baloney on Bologna. It goes better with mustard.  

Instead of sitting behind a computer or use Google,  some on GNI needs to get off their ass and travel to areas, that is not for tourist.   

Tola posted:

American slaves who might come from the same place as Guyanese slaves, took their traditions and food  where they were taken.   Cook-up is not only a Guyanese food.

Yes, they came from West Africa, where rice was grown for over 3000 years. In fact the Asians learnt from the Africans how to make the rice so it wouldn't clump together. As Carib pointed out, West Africans brought Joloff rice to Guyana which later morphed into our cookup rice.

ronan posted:
Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

i recall as a lil bai feeling for fish with my cousins in the flooded rice field

we would advance in a horizontal line picking up mud and spraying it up ahead to blind the fish as we feel out and grab them . . . mostly tilapia

and yes, hunting for buck crab was the most exciting/exotic on the coastal mud flats in WCB especially since they were such a delicacy . . . cooked in coconut milk, yesss bai

me nat only live in town

We had two rice fields rented from Albion sugar estate. Bailing wata was me job. Feeling fa fish and crecketta , while spraying some mud ahead,  made for a good meal afterwards.

The memory of sitting on top of the pole as a boy, while cows were mashing rice, saved me from  depression when my sister was murdered.  

Tola posted:

We had two rice fields rented from Albion sugar estate. Bailing wata was me job. Feeling fa fish and crecketta , while spraying some mud ahead,  made for a good meal afterwards.

The memory of sitting on top of the pole as a boy, while cows were mashing rice, saved me from  depression when my sister was murdered.  

Tola, did they curry the creckette? I think our indian neighbors once made creckete curry. I ate some, but honestly did not know what it was.

Django posted:
ronan posted:

we would advance in a horizontal line picking up mud and spraying it up ahead to blind the fish as we feel out and grab them . . . mostly tilapia

Ronan,

the local fish in rice fields look like below, that's the type of i know of,or probably tilapia was raised in the rice fields.

Aequidens chimantanus

https://www.fishbase.de/identi....php?genus=Aequidens

that's the type i remember . . . not being wan fish expert, all dem that look like dat is "tilapia" to me

ronan posted:

that's the type i remember . . . not being wan fish expert, all dem that look like dat is "tilapia" to me

LOL. true dat. I remember going to red water creek by Sosedyke Linden highway and catching small fish fuh put in we homemade "aquarium". Sure enough, we called dem tilapia too ... lol.

Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

Tola, you coolies say bandin. We inglishman say "fallow". That's right, the fields are flooded and rested during the fallow process. When planting resumes after draining the fields, dem suga cane does be sweet and juicy fo real.

Iguana posted:
Tola posted:

We had two rice fields rented from Albion sugar estate. Bailing wata was me job. Feeling fa fish and crecketta , while spraying some mud ahead,  made for a good meal afterwards.

The memory of sitting on top of the pole as a boy, while cows were mashing rice, saved me from  depression when my sister was murdered.  

Tola, did they curry the creckette? I think our indian neighbors once made creckete curry. I ate some, but honestly did not know what it was.

Iguana, I only remember it being fried and used as a side dish with dhall and rice. I don't remember having it curried.  

Gilbakka posted:

@Drugb

In 1992, I wrote an article on the history of the rice industry in Guyana. It appeared in "Farm World" magazine published by the Alesei Group of Companies. My research showed that rice cultivation was introduced by the Dutch in Essequibo in the 18th century. The original seed paddy was imported from North Carolina. The Dutch used African slave labour for rice cultivation in their Essequibo plantations.

Later, after slavery ended, after East Indians had completed their indentured contracts and got their own land, rice cultivation accelerated and made Guyana a rice EXPORTING colony.

In a nutshell, Afro labour started the local rice industry; Indos produced a surplus for export.

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

Iguana posted:
ronan posted:

that's the type i remember . . . not being wan fish expert, all dem that look like dat is "tilapia" to me

LOL. true dat. I remember going to red water creek by Sosedyke Linden highway and catching small fish fuh put in we homemade "aquarium". Sure enough, we called dem tilapia too ... lol.

Iguana, I was going to write a letter to Guyana news  editor about the scout Camp Jubilee  and Red Water Creek in the 1960s. I might post it here instead. 

Iguana posted:
LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years" https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdfWe note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan. Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

If you and the other joker were truthful, you would acknowledge that it is not the same rice that is used today, nor was it a staple of the African diet. An obscure grain that was produced in limited quantities, probably grown on the roadside and fed to farm animals. 

Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which have NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

Gilbakka posted:
Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

Tola, you coolies say bandin. We inglishman say "fallow". That's right, the fields are flooded and rested during the fallow process. When planting resumes after draining the fields, dem suga cane does be sweet and juicy fo real.

Gil, I did not hear about the fallow  process. I understand it to be the same as bandin, but what  does fallow mean.

I have to go out for a while, but back soon.  

Drugb posted:
Iguana posted:
LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years" https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdfWe note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan. Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

If you and the other joker were truthful, you would acknowledge that it is not the same rice that is used today, nor was it a staple of the African diet. An obscure grain that was produced in limited quantities, probably grown on the roadside and fed to farm animals. 

klown show . . . drugb swinging he bt

lol

ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

It was not a staple in Africa. An obscure regional crop and nothing near the variety used in cookup.

ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

Bhai, leave that chap alone, if he knows the history of Guyana, he would be aware how  rice planting was increased by East Indians.

Wanna bet he doesn't know the old varieties, before the new types was introduced.I grew up on a 3 acre rice farm.

There was a discussion about the old and new varieties of rice here on GNI.

Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

It was not a staple in Africa. An obscure regional crop and nothing near the variety used in cookup.

jackass, "AFRICA" is a huge continent populated by many ethno/racial groups

WEST AFRICA, a sub continent-size area, is the region where most of the Black peoples of the Caribbean find their roots

not South Africa, not East Africa, etc.

THAT "region" is where rice was historically an extremely important food crop way before the depradations of the slave trade

btw, your bt shaking doan impress anybody . . . you know absolutely  NOTHING about rice "varieties" or anything even remotely agro-botanical

however, even for a dunce like you, there is still time to get a proper education

arite?

ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

It was not a staple in Africa. An obscure regional crop and nothing near the variety used in cookup.

jackass, "AFRICA" is a huge continent populated by many ethno/racial groups

WEST AFRICA, a sub continent-size area, is the region where most of the Black peoples of the Caribbean find their roots

not South Africa, not East Africa, etc.

THAT "region" is where rice was historically an extremely important food crop way before the depradations of the slave trade

btw, your bt shaking doan impress anybody . . . you know absolutely  NOTHING about rice "varieties" or anything even remotely agro-botanical

however, even for a dunce like you, there is still time to get a proper education

arite?

Dem afroG didn't know anything about rice cultivation. Is the white man teach them at the end of a whip. Then the Indians came and showed them how it could be done commercially. Look at who the rice farmers are in Guyana, 99.999% indos, that should tell you something. I remember when Bunham, another dunce, tried to force blacks to cultivate rice on the east coast and miserably failed during the 70's. 

Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

It was not a staple in Africa. An obscure regional crop and nothing near the variety used in cookup.

jackass, "AFRICA" is a huge continent populated by many ethno/racial groups

WEST AFRICA, a sub continent-size area, is the region where most of the Black peoples of the Caribbean find their roots

not South Africa, not East Africa, etc.

THAT "region" is where rice was historically an extremely important food crop way before the depradations of the slave trade

btw, your bt shaking doan impress anybody . . . you know absolutely  NOTHING about rice "varieties" or anything even remotely agro-botanical

however, even for a dunce like you, there is still time to get a proper education

arite?

Dem afroG didn't know anything about rice cultivation. Is the white man teach them at the end of a whip. Then the Indians came and showed them how it could be done commercially. Look at who the rice farmers are in Guyana, 99.999% indos, that should tell you something. I remember when Bunham, another dunce, tried to force blacks to cultivate rice on the east coast and miserably failed during the 70's. 

shakeabatty, how exactly does the non-sequitur vomit you deposited above constitute a response to my post?

Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
shakeabatty, how exactly does the non-sequitur vomit you deposited above constitute a response to my post?

Apparently you like to lick up vomit. Now go find an indo to teach you how to plant rice. 

as you scurry back to your vermin hole, ignominy in your wake, it's not worth my while to follow

my work here is done . . . for now

caribny posted:
Tola posted:
s.

 

Since our knowledge today  indicate that Scotland don't have a great relationship with England, why were there so many people of Scottish heritage in Guyana ?      

The "British" who came to the Caribbean were from the peripheral areas and were disproportionately Scottish, Irish, Welch or from the deeply rural parts of England.  They weren't properly treated in the UK so they left for the colonies.

British who came were usually the second sons or the bastard son seeking to make his fortune. The Scott who came were highlanders. Lowland Scots from areas of Aberdeen were the educators and Scott elite. Actually they are the ones ( the lowlanders) who created the modern industrial world. The highlanders had to migrate or indenture themselves or take low paying jobs in the colonies as overseers, grunt soldiers etc. Most of the KKK in the US are from highland clans. My grand father was a highlander. He was a deserter from the wars in South Africa who came to Guyana.

 

Baseman posted:
ball posted:

Mi amigo fram St. Kitts does mek kankee wid sweet potatoes, and as for the origin of black cake, rum cake or fruit cake, I was told that it is of British origin, the names of some foods may differ from region to region for eg. cookup is also called all in one.  Guyana is rather a complex place rich with diversity too bad the people, do not embrace the rich and diverse cultures with an open mind.  A sad state of affairs... <((><    

Is funny you say that.  My son had some Guyanese food and asked how come it’s not more international. He thought it was some in the best.

There is so much positive aspects but people (like Caribj☹️) just dwell of the negatives. 

Guyanese food is fusion food....Indian African European. It is not "more international" because the science of food where trained chefs can break down what constitute the cuisine into its essential building blocks is seil in its nascent phase. The first generation of Guyanese chefs who are trained in food science are currently emerging. Foods only are of commercial value if there can be consistency in creation so ingredients can be cost out and cooking time determined as basic fabricating steps are detailed. Cooking in a kitchen for ones family  is not easily translated to commercial success.  

caribny posted:
ball posted:

Mi amigo fram St. Kitts does mek kankee wid sweet potatoes, and as for the origin of black cake, rum cake or fruit cake, I was told that it is of British origin, the names of some foods may differ from region to region for eg. cookup is also called all in one.  Guyana is rather a complex place rich with diversity too bad the people, do not embrace the rich and diverse cultures with an open mind.  A sad state of affairs... <((><    

Black cake is another example of British culture being adjusted to suit creole tastes.  In fact much of Southern (American) cooking is the same as the cooks were slaves so shifted cooking styles to suit their own purposes.

Sorrel is African (called bissap in Senegal) , ginger beer is both British and African and mauby comes from the Amerindians.

Black cake is the basic fruit cake that all of us hate infused with heavy dose of rum 

yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Every culture in the world has one pot meals. Cookup exists in thousands of cultures. It is basic peasant food.  For us basic ingredient, rice was augmented with any left over meats. Trinis use Rice and lentils  as the base (we sometimes use blackeye peas)

Some are tomato based as the Spanish arroz con pollo and others avoid tomatoes and add potatoes and coconut milk ( from slave culture). Meats added are according to local availability.

There is no standard for cookup. One can hardly go wrong cooking as under cooking is the only possible way to fail. it also that is why kids in Guyana began cooking that first of all in their after school  "bush cook" celebrations To ask for a recipe for cookup is like asking for a recipe for scrambled eggs. Just do it.

Iguana posted:
Tola posted:
Django posted:

How about "Kechree" boiled rice,split peas, salt ,onions , bhagee and coconut milk, no meats. In India is called  "Khichdi"

Me rememba dis meal. But did not remember its name. Thanks.  

Django, you rememba 'do-say' roti. Made from flour, sugar and water or milk ?

In GT, I was staying with a friend whose wife is from Mumbai. She made a small 'do-say' roti, but it had salt and pepper.

Indian restaurants  serve dosas. Maybe our "do say" roti came from that.

dosa implies batter based. Rotie is a flat bread from kneaded and stretched dough

yuji22 posted:
Tola posted:
yuji22 posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

Yuji, the Afro families also 'borrowed' many Indian dishes.

I have Afro friends here from Linden, whom make the best dhall and rice with shrimp/okro side dish.  

That’s what make Guyanese the MOST unique people in the world. Burnham and Cheddi split is up politically. Other than that we fine. 

We does argue and fight but I Never allow anyone to eye pass my Guyanese Brothers and Sisters. 

As much as we may give ourselves credit for good food...we are not very diverse in our cuisine. That diversity is being developed now and it will not be what we know.

Hakka chines food are among the most diverse food culture since they are  Chinese gypsies. They are are not identified by a homeland  but by the word guest family ie Hakka  Most of the Chinese food we know are hakka Chinese since they are the people that came to guyana

Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

The word "bandin" is a form of abandon for any field left fallow. the word is sometimes expressed as "bandon" also.  People in albion and guava bush use the term "bandin"

Sugar cane is usually planted for two crops and left fallow for 18 months to replenish the soil. The fields are usually flooded.

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

Rice existed in Africa. It was planted there for some 6000 years by some accounts. I do not want to go and check but I think the indians got it only around 3000 years ago or less. But it was in africa.

Thanks D2 for your educational contribution.

Dosa implies batter based ...roti is a flat bread. Obvious, but it had to be explained.

Albion Bandin...Others Bandon.  Berbice feget.

Gil, I google  search 'fallow'. I did  not hear it previously. 

The rice fields in Uganda that resulted from water well projects in 2008, must have been contributed by the Indians, who lived there prior to 1972.  When Edi Amin demanded their departure, but Afros continue growing rice.  

D2 posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

Rice existed in Africa. It was planted there for some 6000 years by some accounts. I do not want to go and check but I think the indians got it only around 3000 years ago or less. But it was in africa.

I am not disputing that some form of wild rice was cultivated in Africa. In fact rice is a grass and grass grows everywhere. What is questionable is whether its foundation as a commercial crop began in Africa.  Also, not sure where you got your information of rice in Africa 6000 years ago. Please reference this article, it says China was the origin.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/rice/his...ebating-origins-rice

Drugb posted:

I am not disputing that some form of wild rice was cultivated in Africa. In fact rice is a grass and grass grows everywhere. What is questionable is whether its foundation as a commercial crop began in Africa.  Also, not sure where you got your information of rice in Africa 6000 years ago. Please reference this article, it says China was the origin.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/rice/his...ebating-origins-rice

sand dancing klown

first you holler that blackman never cultivated rice in "Africa"

then you say that the rice in "Africa" is a wild grass and not real "rice" . . . athwart facts that show rice (cereal) was DOMESTICATED in West Africa over 3,000 years ago

yes . . . in the Old World ancestral lands of Caribbean and North American Black people 

your DUNCENESS exposed, you mek a non-sequitur pivot, muttering stupidly that what you really questioning is whether "its foundation as a commercial crop began in Africa" . . . whatever that means

in truth, you "dispute" and/or "question" NOTHING! . . . you just engaging in the shakeabatty of a lifelong 4th rater

so, keep bending over, i am more than prepared to apply heavy lash to your scaly hide . . . every time

the other stuff in your post is 'hopeful' red herring distraction to save face

yaaaaawwn

Leonora posted:

Serious question:  guys, there was a thread here yesterday about Mahdia, what happened to it? I was at a Greek wedding.

A poster's name and age was posted. Before I could report it to Admin, it disappeared. The offender was not suspended; speaks volumes about discrimination.

Bibi Haniffa posted:
Leonora posted:

Serious question:  guys, there was a thread here yesterday about Mahdia, what happened to it? I was at a Greek wedding.

I deleted that thread.  What did you want to see

You can't Admins have assisted.

I have created that thread, the story about Madhia recently became a town.The hate for such under the present gov't have caused you to post a photo shopped picture of a carved rock looking like a penis as the monument.Another poster chimed in about the  Cuffy monument.

It's a disgrace by some East Indians who see in these monument the penis of an an Afro,it shows the gloated minds of such individuals.They are an embarrassment to the East Indians of Guyana and across the Globe.

Drugb posted:

I am not disputing that some form of wild rice was cultivated in Africa. In fact rice is a grass and grass grows everywhere. What is questionable is whether its foundation as a commercial crop began in Africa.  Also, not sure where you got your information of rice in Africa 6000 years ago. Please reference this article, it says China was the origin.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/rice/his...ebating-origins-rice

Dude ease up. In your hastiness to be critical you made a transparently discoverable mistake. Adding the term "commercial" into your statement does not clarify. It is ugly dissimulation. Africa was using rice as a food crop for some thousands of years. Whether it was six or 3.5 thousand years it was a hell of a long time ago. I wrote extemporaneously, I will have to check how I came by the date but my error is not the point of discussion here. It is yours that you so egregiously defend constantly as if denigrating African history is always your aim.  The reality is the world has had a few civilizations and Africa stands as one of  of incomparable greatness. 

Leonora posted:

Serious question:  guys, there was a thread here yesterday about Mahdia, what happened to it? I was at a Greek wedding.

That banna really into the Baigan thingy!  It exposed some [shameful] sick inner cravings of the mentally unstable!  As the saying goes, once you went Black, you can't go back!

I was in Queens and shared it with a few persons before it was deleted, including two women.  They had their Oh My Grandma moment!! 

Baseman posted:
Leonora posted:

Serious question:  guys, there was a thread here yesterday about Mahdia, what happened to it? I was at a Greek wedding.

That banna really into the Baigan thingy!  It exposed some [shameful] sick inner cravings of the mentally unstable!  As the saying goes, once you went Black, you can't go back!

I was in Queens and shared it with a few persons before it was deleted, including two women.  They had their Oh My Grandma moment!! 

Sick minds, bhai.

Django posted:
Baseman posted:
Leonora posted:

Serious question:  guys, there was a thread here yesterday about Mahdia, what happened to it? I was at a Greek wedding.

That banna really into the Baigan thingy!  It exposed some [shameful] sick inner cravings of the mentally unstable!  As the saying goes, once you went Black, you can't go back!

I was in Queens and shared it with a few persons before it was deleted, including two women.  They had their Oh My Grandma moment!! 

Sick minds, bhai.

Intellectual authors of the PPP [not so fake] BJ 3rd-Term thrust!!!

Baseman posted:
Leonora posted:

Serious question:  guys, there was a thread here yesterday about Mahdia, what happened to it? I was at a Greek wedding.

That banna really into the Baigan thingy!  It exposed some [shameful] sick inner cravings of the mentally unstable!  As the saying goes, once you went Black, you can't go back!

I was in Queens and shared it with a few persons before it was deleted, including two women.  They had their Oh My Grandma moment!! 

You should have shared it with Dr. Bharrat Jagdeo to show him what his supporters are doing on a Guyanese site, and that such behavior will never garner PPP votes. He needs to caution them.

D2 posted:
Drugb posted:

I am not disputing that some form of wild rice was cultivated in Africa. In fact rice is a grass and grass grows everywhere. What is questionable is whether its foundation as a commercial crop began in Africa.  Also, not sure where you got your information of rice in Africa 6000 years ago. Please reference this article, it says China was the origin.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/rice/his...ebating-origins-rice

Dude ease up. In your hastiness to be critical you made a transparently discoverable mistake. Adding the term "commercial" into your statement does not clarify. It is ugly dissimulation. Africa was using rice as a food crop for some thousands of years. Whether it was six or 3.5 thousand years it was a hell of a long time ago. I wrote extemporaneously, I will have to check how I came by the date but my error is not the point of discussion here. It is yours that you so egregiously defend constantly as if denigrating African history is always your aim.  The reality is the world has had a few civilizations and Africa stands as one of  of incomparable greatness. 

If you and the sloppy boys would pay attention, you would note that I stated that rice was never prevalent in Africa.  In fact the academics agree that it was first cultivated in China. However it looks like many of you Granger brown nosers have an agenda to rush to accredit afros with the least of accomplishments even if not true. Soon you will tell us that they discovered the cure for polio.  

Drugb posted:
D2 posted:
Drugb posted:

I am not disputing that some form of wild rice was cultivated in Africa. In fact rice is a grass and grass grows everywhere. What is questionable is whether its foundation as a commercial crop began in Africa.  Also, not sure where you got your information of rice in Africa 6000 years ago. Please reference this article, it says China was the origin.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/rice/his...ebating-origins-rice

Dude ease up. In your hastiness to be critical you made a transparently discoverable mistake. Adding the term "commercial" into your statement does not clarify. It is ugly dissimulation. Africa was using rice as a food crop for some thousands of years. Whether it was six or 3.5 thousand years it was a hell of a long time ago. I wrote extemporaneously, I will have to check how I came by the date but my error is not the point of discussion here. It is yours that you so egregiously defend constantly as if denigrating African history is always your aim.  The reality is the world has had a few civilizations and Africa stands as one of  of incomparable greatness. 

If you and the sloppy boys would pay attention, you would note that I stated that rice was never prevalent in Africa.  In fact the academics agree that it was first cultivated in China. However it looks like many of you Granger brown nosers have an agenda to rush to accredit afros with the least of accomplishments even if not true. Soon you will tell us that they discovered the cure for polio.  

still trying to walk when you are on broken legs...lie to yourself if you must. What you said is above.

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

 Continuing to display your ignorance.  In fact the rice plantation owners WHO DID NOT KNOW HOW TO GROW RICE, specifically imported enslaved people from regions of Africa where they did know how to grow rice.   So it was these African enslaved peoples who introduced the rice growing traditions in South Carolina.

Because the conditions in these rice growing areas were harsh (very high humidity, swampy and filled with poisonous snakes) few whites lived in these areas.  And a unique Gullah Geechee culture emerged.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jollof_rice

Note that Jollof rice was a dish known during the Mali empire.  You are ignorant so you need to know that the Mali empire began and in fact ended LONG BEFORE any contact with the Europeans.

Drugb posted:
 

I am not disputing that some form of wild rice was cultivated in Africa. In fact rice is a grass and grass grows everywhere. What is questionable is whether its foundation as a commercial crop began in Africa.  Also, not sure where you got your information of rice in Africa 6000 years ago. Please reference this article, it says China was the origin.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/rice/his...ebating-origins-rice

Your original scream was that cook up rice couldn't be "black man food" because according to you blacks knew nothing about rice before Indians arrived. 

In your simpleton ways you dont consider that one pot dishes with rice are popular among black communities from South Carolina all the way down to Brazil, so yes consumption of rice was known long before the first Indian indenture walked off the plank in British Guiana.

The rice was clearly NOT being sourced in India or China as the transportation of that era wouldn't have permitted it.  In fact rice was grown in South Carolina and elsewhere and shipped to the Caribbean slave plantations, together with salted meats and corn/wheat flour.  Ground provisions and plantains were grown in the Caribbean, hence your illogical notion that this is the only foods that blacks knew about.

In fact the African rice was of a different species than the Asian so in fact its YOU who need to thank the Chinese for their rice. Africans had domesticated the varieties that they found there. 

Given the different settlement patterns and the lower population densities Africans had no need for huge plantations as did the Indians and the Chinese.  Their economies were based on producing what they needed and buying what they couldn't produce. Their trading partners in North Africa also had rice so there was no need to sell it to them.

The issue with African vs. Asian rice is this. During the colonial era cocoa, coffee and palm oil were the commercial crops, not rice, so all of the focus on improving rice varieties that occurred under the FAO and other organizations was focused on the Asian varieties.  So today the Asian varieties are higher yielding whereas the African varieties remain relative unchanged.

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