Mitwah posted:
Mars posted:

I don’t know half of the words that country folks use and many of them I only learned by seeing them mentioned here on GNI. I wouldn’t expect Vish to be familiar with those words if he left Guyana at a young age.

me thinks he was wan lil dugla bacha. 

Dugla is from hindi word doogalaa meaning many, much or mixed. Bacha in hindi means "child".

Well we can't doubt or confirm who or what he is since he's refused to answer when we ask at what age he migrated here. So on that note I have no further deliberations with him (or her).

Iguana posted:
 

 

 

So don't paint all Indians like you did. There is a difference between urban and country Indians. It's part of the cultural differences in Guyana, though yuh gon hearing nuff wailing and screaming about this.

Now, there is similiar among Guyanese blacks, but it is not location based. It is economic based. Bourgeois blacks versus common blacks. "Elite" blacks like Granger, Trotman, etc. versus the more "common" blacks. Suh we have it too (minus the buggery). More class based than location based.

A lil "education" fuh you on yuh homeland. Use it wisely. And doant tun yuh back pon de crew above.

Yes the dichotomy within the black/mixed population is more urban elites vs. the grass roots (urban and rural).   You are correct about the rural/urban Indian dichotomy but there is also class issues. Jagdeo (now elite) looks down with scorn at poor and/or uneducated rural Indians and laughs at how gullible people like yuji are.   

Jagdeo will slap hands and share in the spoils of corruption with Harmon but will spout bile bigotry to attract the likes of the Indo KKK.

kp posted:
 It was OK for you to talk about Black Pudding, that's a code word for a Black man's dick, If this shit bother you, don't read it , just move on to Social or Religion. I guess you so Straight, you never had Sex.

The Indo KKK are really interesting.  They seriously hate black people but are really in love with black male organs.  Now we know that it isnt just black baigan, but now its also black pudding.

I learn a lot on GNI.

Leonora posted:
Mars posted:
Iguana posted:
kp posted:

It was OK for you to talk about Black Pudding, that's a code word for a Black man's dick,

....WHAT?????!!!!!!! Suh black pudding, de Guyanese delicacy widely consumed by all races when dey drinking likka is a "code word for black man's dick"???????? LMFAO.

Dude, you are nothing but an old fag. Your wife should hide every cylindrical object in the house lest you molest yuh old self LMFAO!!!!!!

Hahaha. Me never laugh so much. If that’s what the man fantasizes about when he’s eating black pudding, who are you to deny him his fun?

I was in a restaurant and laughed so much, everyone said they wanted what I was having.  

Tell them yu having Black pudden!!

Iguana posted:
 

 

Banna ah don't tink KP know what black pudding is. He doan know is actually something people in Guyana eat. Skeleton Man was asking me what is souse! Dese guys didn't get out much. LMBO!

A Guyanese function isnt Guyanese if there isnt chow mien, fry rice, cook up rice, black pudding, pepper pot, roti/dhal puri, and an assorted variety of curried meats.

I am curious about these people who live within an ethnic bubble. Where do they live? The Corentyne?

GTAngler posted:
Mitwah posted:
Mars posted:

I don’t know half of the words that country folks use and many of them I only learned by seeing them mentioned here on GNI. I wouldn’t expect Vish to be familiar with those words if he left Guyana at a young age.

me thinks he was wan lil dugla bacha. 

Dugla is from hindi word doogalaa meaning many, much or mixed. Bacha in hindi means "child".

Well we can't doubt or confirm who or what he is since he's refused to answer when we ask at what age he migrated here. So on that note I have no further deliberations with him (or her).

He once stated how old he was when he left Guyana and I don’t have any reason to doubt him. We can’t confirm who or what anyone is on this forum so that would not be a reason to not interact with someone. What does it matter anyway? It’s the internet and there are certain things you just have to overlook if you want to be a part of this community.

Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:
Mitwah posted:
Mars posted:

I don’t know half of the words that country folks use and many of them I only learned by seeing them mentioned here on GNI. I wouldn’t expect Vish to be familiar with those words if he left Guyana at a young age.

me thinks he was wan lil dugla bacha. 

Dugla is from hindi word doogalaa meaning many, much or mixed. Bacha in hindi means "child".

Well we can't doubt or confirm who or what he is since he's refused to answer when we ask at what age he migrated here. So on that note I have no further deliberations with him (or her).

He once stated how old he was when he left Guyana and I don’t have any reason to doubt him. We can’t confirm who or what anyone is on this forum so that would not be a reason to not interact with someone. What does it matter anyway? It’s the internet and there are certain things you just have to overlook if you want to be a part of this community.

That's my reason. Cain asked twice and so did I.

caribny posted:
kp posted:
 It was OK for you to talk about Black Pudding, that's a code word for a Black man's dick, If this shit bother you, don't read it , just move on to Social or Religion. I guess you so Straight, you never had Sex.

The Indo KKK are really interesting.  They seriously hate black people but are really in love with black male organs.  Now we know that it isnt just black baigan, but now its also black pudding.

I learn a lot on GNI.

So you have a Black Pudding,  you never too old to learn.

GTAngler posted:

That's my reason. Cain asked twice and so did I.

You’re talking to me and you don’t know what age I was when I left Guyana so why is that so important? Maybe I never lived in Guyana and I’m 105 years old. You can’t confirm the details for anyone here so What does it matter?

Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:

That's my reason. Cain asked twice and so did I.

You’re talking to me and you don’t know what age I was when I left Guyana so why is that so important? Maybe I never lived in Guyana and I’m 105 years old. You can’t confirm the details for anyone here so What does it matter?

I never asked you.......

GTAngler posted:
Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:

That's my reason. Cain asked twice and so did I.

You’re talking to me and you don’t know what age I was when I left Guyana so why is that so important? Maybe I never lived in Guyana and I’m 105 years old. You can’t confirm the details for anyone here so What does it matter?

I never asked you.......

Y’all take this place too serious. I’m asking you now and you’re evading the question. You can’t confirm the details for anyone here so what does it matter?

Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:
Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:

That's my reason. Cain asked twice and so did I.

You’re talking to me and you don’t know what age I was when I left Guyana so why is that so important? Maybe I never lived in Guyana and I’m 105 years old. You can’t confirm the details for anyone here so What does it matter?

I never asked you.......

Y’all take this place too serious. I’m asking you now and you’re evading the question. You can’t confirm the details for anyone here so what does it matter?

Maybe I am taking this too seriously. The question was only pertinent in this case. Lots of questions asked and ignorance feigned.

GTAngler posted:
Mitwah posted:
Mars posted:

I don’t know half of the words that country folks use and many of them I only learned by seeing them mentioned here on GNI. I wouldn’t expect Vish to be familiar with those words if he left Guyana at a young age.

me thinks he was wan lil dugla bacha. 

Dugla is from hindi word doogalaa meaning many, much or mixed. Bacha in hindi means "child".

Well we can't doubt or confirm who or what he is since he's refused to answer when we ask at what age he migrated here. So on that note I have no further deliberations with him (or her).

Dah rass doan want us fo know what age he was when he lef...he hiding something deh.

Iguana posted:
Leonora posted:

Hey Gil, I heard some Irish people conversing, then turned around to give them a second look because it sounded like Guyanese Creole.

Likely Scottish. My grandfather used to tell us that a lot of the plantation overseers and whites in Guyana were mostly Scottish. He was a teacher and had a lot of contact with them.

Gaiutra Bahadur did much research, then wrote an excellent book 'Coolie woman'. She went to Scotland too to trace some overseers' families and explain about them. She said lots of Guyanese village and town names are still in existence in Scotland, e.g. Alness, Rosehall, etc.

Leonora posted:
Iguana posted:
Leonora posted:

Hey Gil, I heard some Irish people conversing, then turned around to give them a second look because it sounded like Guyanese Creole.

Likely Scottish. My grandfather used to tell us that a lot of the plantation overseers and whites in Guyana were mostly Scottish. He was a teacher and had a lot of contact with them.

Gaiutra Bahadur did much research, then wrote an excellent book 'Coolie woman'. She went to Scotland too to trace some overseers' families and explain about them. She said lots of Guyanese village and town names are still in existence in Scotland, e.g. Alness, Rosehall, etc.

I believe my copy of the 'Coolie Woman' is still around the house, that I did not read yet.  Regarding my Scottish background, I have to read it.

I have a number of photos of the logies and an aerial photo of Albion in 1945. This is now a vacant area, after the people moved to new settlements.

During my travels in the UK last summer, I was told the models for  logie row houses  in Guyana were from Scotland. The slaves first lived in it and also myself, doing my earlier years.  

My great grand mother  was from India and my G grandfather was  a Scottish plantation manager. After witnessing sexual abuse of weeding gang women in the 1950s, I doubt that  my great grandparents had a mutual relationship and she have been abused,  when my grandmother Mary Murray  was born.

Near Albion school was a guava field where we had lunch and filled our sauce pans with guavas. Many times the managers would abuse the women. Even if they pleaded  that their husband might leave them, if they become pregnant, this  did not prevent  the assault.

Since our knowledge today  indicate that Scotland don't have a great relationship with England, why were there so many people of Scottish heritage in Guyana ?      

@Tola

Many plantations were owned by Scots who employed their countrymen to run them. The Church of Scotland played a big role in those plantations by establishing schools. I attended Uitvlugt Church of Scotland School which later morphed into Uitvlugt Primary School. The old cemetery alongside the church in the schoolyard has tombs with Scotsmen's bones, as indicated on the headstones.

Gilbakka posted:

@Tola

Many plantations were owned by Scots who employed their countrymen to run them. The Church of Scotland played a big role in those plantations by establishing schools. I attended Uitvlugt Church of Scotland School which later morphed into Uitvlugt Primary School. The old cemetery alongside the church in the schoolyard has tombs with Scotsmen's bones, as indicated on the headstones.

I remember that cemetery  the teacher would take the class to do reading and we would sit on the tombs. 

Thanks Gil, I now understand.

I attended Albion Canadian Presbyterian Mission school, but Rose Hall town that Leonora mentioned,  had a Church of Scot school.

Leonora, FYI, There is Rose Hall Town [previous village] near Port Mourant and Rose Hall sugar estate is near Canje and New Amsterdam.

During Wilberforce efforts to free the slaves, he had an uphill battle, because  many of the British MPs owned  plantations in the Caribbean with slaves.  But Scottish owners might not have been part of  that history.

Leonora, I know Guava Bush very well. My school friend  Nar who is  the retired  assistant head teacher at Lesbeholden Black Bush Polder school, lived at GB  when we attended Albion school. They had many fruit trees where we had lunch.

In the early 1959 when our logie was broken down and we moved to Belvedere, I walked  past the rice fields near Guava Bush and nearby Topoo to Albion school. I wrote many  stories about this place for our Canadian GC, regarding  my school days. 

During our teenage years, Nar reminds me of the time his sister asked him to pick up  a bra for her,  from my sister Agnes, manager  at Rose Hall Town Alim Shaw store. It was so embarrassing describing what we wanted and my sister on purpose did not provide any clue, until everyone in the store knew what we wanted.

I believe Nar's sister  is now in the US and my sister Agnes was murdered by three men,  during a robbery at her Rose Hall Town Reef house.   

 

 

 

Tola posted:
s.

 

Since our knowledge today  indicate that Scotland don't have a great relationship with England, why were there so many people of Scottish heritage in Guyana ?      

The "British" who came to the Caribbean were from the peripheral areas and were disproportionately Scottish, Irish, Welch or from the deeply rural parts of England.  They weren't properly treated in the UK so they left for the colonies.

Mars posted:
.

Black pudding is European. They call it blood sausage. There are variations of blood sausage in many European countries. I think we got the Scottish version in Guyana. Not sure where souse originated.

As with the language Afro Caribbean people took this dish and adjusted it to their tastes, adding seasoning and using rice.   I had a black pudding in Barbados which was closer to what the Scottish would have introduced and it tasted terrible.

Leonora posted:

Hey Gil, I heard some Irish people conversing, then turned around to give them a second look because it sounded like Guyanese Creole.

Yes the "English" who the enslaved people encountered were Irish, and from parts of England where the dialect is similar.  So we didn't learn English from the English, but from other British people who were also learning English.  "Ting," "dem" and waak (walk) comes from the Irish. Jamaicans and people from the Leeward Islands have high Irish influences in their speech.

Based on the names of the plantations Guyana had a high Scottish involvement as some one mentioned.  For some reason we sound a bit like people from the Virgin Islands, St Maarten and Belize.

Iguana posted:
Leonora posted:

I remember Dad long ago mixing the ingredients into a paste, putting it in banana leaves, wrapping the leaves into 2"x2" squares and tying them with twine, then boiling them in a large pot. Delicious!  

Konkee. I think the Amerindians used to put the banana leaf squares into a hole in the ground with coals around it. That is real old fashioned Guyanese stuff. Spanish people also make it. They call it Pasteles. Ricans boil it. Dominicans fry it.

Konke is from Ghana.  They have a savory version which they call kenke.

Our creole cultures are blended so that origins of much of it is diverse so we often cannot say where they are from. Its often combining various influences from different origins, or taking something from a culture and adjusting it.  And its a continuously evolving culture.

Mi amigo fram St. Kitts does mek kankee wid sweet potatoes, and as for the origin of black cake, rum cake or fruit cake, I was told that it is of British origin, the names of some foods may differ from region to region for eg. cookup is also called all in one.  Guyana is rather a complex place rich with diversity too bad the people, do not embrace the rich and diverse cultures with an open mind.  A sad state of affairs... <((><    

ball posted:

Mi amigo fram St. Kitts does mek kankee wid sweet potatoes, and as for the origin of black cake, rum cake or fruit cake, I was told that it is of British origin, the names of some foods may differ from region to region for eg. cookup is also called all in one.  Guyana is rather a complex place rich with diversity too bad the people, do not embrace the rich and diverse cultures with an open mind.  A sad state of affairs... <((><    

Is funny you say that.  My son had some Guyanese food and asked how come it’s not more international. He thought it was some in the best.

There is so much positive aspects but people (like Caribj☹️) just dwell of the negatives. 

Baseman posted:

There is so much positive aspects but people (like Caribj☹️) just dwell of the negatives. 

Suh people like Yugli, Skelly, KP, "Dave", Nehru, Drugb and other Indian RACISTS dwelling pon "positives" hay????? Some of dese people know NOTHING about Guyana outside of their Indian existence and Indian food. 

Carib is a true Guyanese. Notice the man's wide knowledge about we language, history, culture, foods, and suh on. Yuh friends above care only about things INDIAN! Nothing wrong with that, but they have ZERO interest or appreciation for those around them. These idiots and their supremacist ideology believe that Indian is best and everything and everyone else is shit. Dat ain't "positive" where I come from.

Y'all doan like Carib because he points out the racist, Hindutva supremacist shit.

Iguana posted:
Baseman posted:

There is so much positive aspects but people (like Caribj☹️) just dwell of the negatives. 

Suh people like Yugli, Skelly, KP, "Dave", Nehru, Drugb and other Indian RACISTS dwelling pon "positives" hay????? Some of dese people know NOTHING about Guyana outside of their Indian existence and Indian food. 

Carib is a true Guyanese. Notice the man's wide knowledge about we language, history, culture, foods, and suh on. Yuh friends above care only about things INDIAN! Nothing wrong with that, but they have ZERO interest or appreciation for those around them. These idiots and their supremacist ideology believe that Indian is best and everything and everyone else is shit. Dat ain't "positive" where I come from.

Y'all doan like Carib because he points out the racist, Hindutva supremacist shit.

Reptile you finally found your idol  as usual you have low standards.  

caribny posted:

A Guyanese function isnt Guyanese if there isnt chow mien, fry rice, cook up rice, black pudding, pepper pot, roti/dhal puri, and an assorted variety of curried meats.

I am curious about these people who live within an ethnic bubble. Where do they live? The Corentyne?

Sounds like a few of them here are from Corentyne. I never met Indian folks who didn't know what souse or black pudding was so doan know where these creatures hay come from.

Add unfamiliarity with each other as another reason for our racial tension. From the exchanges, clearly several of the Indians hay grew up in they lil racist enclave where they were told black people were some evil savages without any culture, class or education and the Indian was superior.

Iguana posted:
Baseman posted:

There is so much positive aspects but people (like Caribj☹️) just dwell of the negatives. 

Suh people like Yugli, Skelly, KP, "Dave", Nehru, Drugb and other Indian RACISTS dwelling pon "positives" hay????? Some of dese people know NOTHING about Guyana outside of their Indian existence and Indian food. 

Carib is a true Guyanese. Notice the man's wide knowledge about we language, history, culture, foods, and suh on. Yuh friends above care only about things INDIAN! Nothing wrong with that, but they have ZERO interest or appreciation for those around them. These idiots and their supremacist ideology believe that Indian is best and everything and everyone else is shit. Dat ain't "positive" where I come from.

Y'all doan like Carib because he points out the racist, Hindutva supremacist shit.

Nah, me like Cribby.  He’s a good banna!

ball posted:

Mi amigo fram St. Kitts does mek kankee wid sweet potatoes, and as for the origin of black cake, rum cake or fruit cake, I was told that it is of British origin, the names of some foods may differ from region to region for eg. cookup is also called all in one.  Guyana is rather a complex place rich with diversity too bad the people, do not embrace the rich and diverse cultures with an open mind.  A sad state of affairs... <((><    

Black cake is another example of British culture being adjusted to suit creole tastes.  In fact much of Southern (American) cooking is the same as the cooks were slaves so shifted cooking styles to suit their own purposes.

Sorrel is African (called bissap in Senegal) , ginger beer is both British and African and mauby comes from the Amerindians.

yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Yuji, if you look at the method used as teenagers for us to bush-cook, cook-up or all-in-one, it might give some clue how it might have started.

I believe just like making 'do-say' roti, with few ingredients like flour, sugar and water  to make a breakfast meal, cook-up might have started due to poverty, where everyone is asked to bring an ingredient for the pot.

I can now understand when homeless 'beggars'  ask for help from house to house and  are given some uncooked rice or a potato.  This can be used to prepare a simple meal, with veggys they can find in most kitchen gardens.

Often the meat for cook-up is a chicken, we usually 'borrow' from the neighbour's chicken coop. But we always invite a boy from that family to enjoy the meal and bunjal chicken chesa, so if we are even discovered, he will be just as guilty as we are and declared innocent of the fact.[Simple teenage logic] 

That method worked well, until after we kill the chicken and cannot find a boy from that family to enjoy the meal. Den our kok  duk to explain the chicken in our cook-up.   Hiding the feathers don't seem to help much.

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

caribny posted:
ball posted:

Mi amigo fram St. Kitts does mek kankee wid sweet potatoes, and as for the origin of black cake, rum cake or fruit cake, I was told that it is of British origin, the names of some foods may differ from region to region for eg. cookup is also called all in one.  Guyana is rather a complex place rich with diversity too bad the people, do not embrace the rich and diverse cultures with an open mind.  A sad state of affairs... <((><    

Black cake is another example of British culture being adjusted to suit creole tastes.  In fact much of Southern (American) cooking is the same as the cooks were slaves so shifted cooking styles to suit their own purposes.

Sorrel is African (called bissap in Senegal) , ginger beer is both British and African and mauby comes from the Amerindians.

Yes, black cake is from the British rum cake. However, we Guyanese being the likka dogs that we are, added mo likka and different assortment of fruits. There was also "five finger drink" which I think also came from the Amerindians. Soak the "5 finger fruit" in water for a few days and then use the water with sugar of course.

GTAngler posted:

Tried making souse with chicken feet the other day. Must have missed a step. Friggin thing came out tasteless. Then again was a Trini recipe. Back to meh Guyanese Cook Book.

Yes, you missed a step. Yuh gaffo TEEF de chicken from yuh neighba. Den de souse duz come out nice and sweet.

yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Stop pretendin' yuh give a shit about anything Guyanese. You are KNOWN! Guh eat yuh vegetable and ress yuhself. Cookup iz "black man food" as yuh cousin Skeleton man would say, suh stop feignin' interest like how yuh feign dat yuh like Marley.

Tola posted:

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Yes, African and possibly Amerindian. Yams, cassava, plantain, etc with meat and/or fish (fried). Also a nicely made dough sometimes stuffed with ham (I'm sure that was a late addition). That piece of dough used to be called "duff" (from the word dough). Some folks added a lil gravy, especially if fish was used. Also seen Indians eat this.

Iguana posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Stop pretendin' yuh give a shit about anything Guyanese. You are KNOWN! Guh eat yuh vegetable and ress yuhself. Cookup iz "black man food" as yuh cousin Skeleton man would say, suh stop feignin' interest like how yuh feign dat yuh like Marley.

Who tell you that? Best cook-up I ever ate was cooked on a wood fire in the back yard home. My father loved to play dominoes and that was a weekend thing. He would wake up early, walk along the train line when he knew people had gardens, buy fresh vegetables including fresh pidgeon peas and freshly grated/squeezed coconut milk and throw on a pot of cook-up and he and the boys would drink and play dominoes. Cook-up had many variations but always had salted beef unless there was someone who didn't eat beef.

Iguana posted:
Tola posted:

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Yes, African and possibly Amerindian. Yams, cassava, plantain, etc with meat and/or fish (fried). Also a nicely made dough sometimes stuffed with ham (I'm sure that was a late addition). That piece of dough used to be called "duff" (from the word dough). Some folks added a lil gravy, especially if fish was used. Also seen Indians eat this.

Thanks Iguana, that makes sense.

There was also a soup with DUMPLINGS that I enjoyed. It had lots of veggys, but I am not sure if it had any meat. The dumplings were added on top after the soup is finished and just allowed to steam.

I like butter fish, fried or cooked in tomato sauce.   

Tola posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Yuji, if you look at the method used as teenagers for us to bush-cook, cook-up or all-in-one, it might give some clue how it might have started.

I believe just like making 'do-say' roti, with few ingredients like flour, sugar and water  to make a breakfast meal, cook-up might have started due to poverty, where everyone is asked to bring an ingredient for the pot.

I can now understand when homeless 'beggars'  ask for help from house to house and  are given some uncooked rice or a potato.  This can be used to prepare a simple meal, with veggys they can find in most kitchen gardens.

Often the meat for cook-up is a chicken, we usually 'borrow' from the neighbour's chicken coop. But we always invite a boy from that family to enjoy the meal and bunjal chicken chesa, so if we are even discovered, he will be just as guilty as we are and declared innocent of the fact.[Simple teenage logic] 

That method worked well, until after we kill the chicken and cannot find a boy from that family to enjoy the meal. Den our kok  duk to explain the chicken in our cook-up.   Hiding the feathers don't seem to help much.

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

kp posted:
Tola posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Yuji, if you look at the method used as teenagers for us to bush-cook, cook-up or all-in-one, it might give some clue how it might have started.

I believe just like making 'do-say' roti, with few ingredients like flour, sugar and water  to make a breakfast meal, cook-up might have started due to poverty, where everyone is asked to bring an ingredient for the pot.

I can now understand when homeless 'beggars'  ask for help from house to house and  are given some uncooked rice or a potato.  This can be used to prepare a simple meal, with veggys they can find in most kitchen gardens.

Often the meat for cook-up is a chicken, we usually 'borrow' from the neighbour's chicken coop. But we always invite a boy from that family to enjoy the meal and bunjal chicken chesa, so if we are even discovered, he will be just as guilty as we are and declared innocent of the fact.[Simple teenage logic] 

That method worked well, until after we kill the chicken and cannot find a boy from that family to enjoy the meal. Den our kok  duk to explain the chicken in our cook-up.   Hiding the feathers don't seem to help much.

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

Growing up I always knew that as Methem or Metagee.

Django posted:

How about "Kechree" boiled rice,split peas, salt ,onions , bhagee and coconut milk, no meats. In India is called  "Khichdi"

Me rememba dis meal. But did not remember its name. Thanks.  

Django, you rememba 'do-say' roti. Made from flour, sugar and water or milk ?

In GT, I was staying with a friend whose wife is from Mumbai. She made a small 'do-say' roti, but it had salt and pepper.

Tola posted:
Django posted:

How about "Kechree" boiled rice,split peas, salt ,onions , bhagee and coconut milk, no meats. In India is called  "Khichdi"

Me rememba dis meal. But did not remember its name. Thanks.  

Django, you rememba 'do-say' roti. Made from flour, sugar and water or milk ?

In GT, I was staying with a friend whose wife is from Mumbai. She made a small 'do-say' roti, but it had salt and pepper.

Is that like pancakes ??

Django posted:
Tola posted:
Django posted:

How about "Kechree" boiled rice,split peas, salt ,onions , bhagee and coconut milk, no meats. In India is called  "Khichdi"

Me rememba dis meal. But did not remember its name. Thanks.  

Django, you rememba 'do-say' roti. Made from flour, sugar and water or milk ?

In GT, I was staying with a friend whose wife is from Mumbai. She made a small 'do-say' roti, but it had salt and pepper.

Is that like pancakes ??

sounds more like masala dosa. By the way, "pancake"??? Yuh mean chota???

GTAngler posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
Django posted:

How about "Kechree" boiled rice,split peas, salt ,onions , bhagee and coconut milk, no meats. In India is called  "Khichdi"

Me rememba dis meal. But did not remember its name. Thanks.  

Django, you rememba 'do-say' roti. Made from flour, sugar and water or milk ?

In GT, I was staying with a friend whose wife is from Mumbai. She made a small 'do-say' roti, but it had salt and pepper.

Is that like pancakes ??

sounds more like masala dosa. By the way, "pancake"??? Yuh mean chota???

Yep

Django posted:
GTAngler posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
Django posted:

How about "Kechree" boiled rice,split peas, salt ,onions , bhagee and coconut milk, no meats. In India is called  "Khichdi"

Me rememba dis meal. But did not remember its name. Thanks.  

Django, you rememba 'do-say' roti. Made from flour, sugar and water or milk ?

In GT, I was staying with a friend whose wife is from Mumbai. She made a small 'do-say' roti, but it had salt and pepper.

Is that like pancakes ??

sounds more like masala dosa. By the way, "pancake"??? Yuh mean chota???

Yep

YEA...CHOTA...[also masala dosa.] It been decades since I had any chota,  I will try to make some, in my cast-iron frying pan.

This experience is taking me back to my boyhood days, when I waited in our logie kitchen for my late sister Elaine to finish make a chota, so I can eat it hot. Fighting smoke in my eyes by the fireside with a plate in my hands.

I have a burn mark about the size of quarter on my right back. It got there when I constantly begged for some sugar cake, but told it was still hot. I insisted, so the same sister put some hot sugar cake in my hand and as I shook it off, it landed at the back of my right shoulder, leaving a lasting mark.  

What do you call those cups and plates that would flake off a piece, if it dropped or hit on hard surface ?   

yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Iguana posted:
GTAngler posted:

Tried making souse with chicken feet the other day. Must have missed a step. Friggin thing came out tasteless. Then again was a Trini recipe. Back to meh Guyanese Cook Book.

Yes, you missed a step. Yuh gaffo TEEF de chicken from yuh neighba. Den de souse duz come out nice and sweet.

Never associated souse with Trinis.  I think it was brought to Guyana by the Bajans, another British to creole adaptation.

Iguana posted:
Tola posted:

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Yes, African and possibly Amerindian. Yams, cassava, plantain, etc with meat and/or fish (fried). Also a nicely made dough sometimes stuffed with ham (I'm sure that was a late addition). That piece of dough used to be called "duff" (from the word dough). Some folks added a lil gravy, especially if fish was used. Also seen Indians eat this.

Another West African dish.  I was describing "unique" Guyanese food to a Ghanaian and was talking about metem.  He stopped me right there and told me that they have the same dish in Ghana and call it by the same name.  It exists in various forms throughout the Caribbean.

GTAngler posted:
Iguana posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Stop pretendin' yuh give a shit about anything Guyanese. You are KNOWN! Guh eat yuh vegetable and ress yuhself. Cookup iz "black man food" as yuh cousin Skeleton man would say, suh stop feignin' interest like how yuh feign dat yuh like Marley.

Who tell you that? Best cook-up I ever ate was cooked on a wood fire in the back yard home.

It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

Bottom line is that despite the low key tribal warfare that we have in Guyana there is much cultural interchange and adaptation in our foods, language, etc.  To the point where we often don't even know the origins of some of this.

For instance the word "jook" which every Caribbean person knows.  Some attribute it to English origins and others to West African.  One thing though is I don't think that English people use that word anymore.  The word "deh" has connections to one of the Nigerian languages, I think Igbo.  That is in some one saying " he deh over dere". 

Also when you want to emphasize a word we repeat it as in "he too stupidee, stupidee".  Again West African grammar using English connected words, though how many of us know this.  Its a Ghanaian who told me the West African origins when I used it once.  He laughed and told me that he knew fully well that I didn't know how African it was.

caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

GTAngler posted:
Iguana posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Stop pretendin' yuh give a shit about anything Guyanese. You are KNOWN! Guh eat yuh vegetable and ress yuhself. Cookup iz "black man food" as yuh cousin Skeleton man would say, suh stop feignin' interest like how yuh feign dat yuh like Marley.

Who tell you that? Best cook-up I ever ate was cooked on a wood fire in the back yard home. My father loved to play dominoes and that was a weekend thing. He would wake up early, walk along the train line when he knew people had gardens, buy fresh vegetables including fresh pidgeon peas and freshly grated/squeezed coconut milk and throw on a pot of cook-up and he and the boys would drink and play dominoes. Cook-up had many variations but always had salted beef unless there was someone who didn't eat beef.

....was saying that Skeleton Man would say it's black man food. I don't think of it that way. To me it's Guyanese. And yes, I've seen Indian and portugese folks make a good cook up. To me, salt beef cookup was de best.

caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

caribny posted:
Iguana posted:
GTAngler posted:

Tried making souse with chicken feet the other day. Must have missed a step. Friggin thing came out tasteless. Then again was a Trini recipe. Back to meh Guyanese Cook Book.

Yes, you missed a step. Yuh gaffo TEEF de chicken from yuh neighba. Den de souse duz come out nice and sweet.

Never associated souse with Trinis.  I think it was brought to Guyana by the Bajans, another British to creole adaptation.

Y'all rememba dis song? lol

https://youtu.be/ZqWLwZIncec

https://youtu.be/ZqWLwZIncec

 

Django posted:
Tola posted:

What do you call those cups and plates that would flake off a piece, if it dropped or hit on hard surface ?   

They were enameled plates and cups.

Thanks everyone for all this, its very educational. My life was isolated from Guyanese culture for many decades with a Canadian family  and I forget many of these things.

CARIBNY, our African store is operated by Denise from Ghana, I have to share a lot more about our Guyanese culture with her.  

Django, Thanks.  I could not remember the make of the plates and cups.

But I do remember hitting sheep and goats at the school water well, who try to get into our food dish, while washing and bits would fake off.

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

GTAngler posted:
kp posted:
Tola posted:

 

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

Growing up I always knew that as Methem or Metagee.

Metemgee is made with coconut milk. If we make it without the coconut milk, we call it dry food. I’ve heard people also call it hard food or you can fry it and call it boil and fry.

Most times we make metemgee, we use saltfish instead of meat.

Tola posted:
Django posted:

How about "Kechree" boiled rice,split peas, salt ,onions , bhagee and coconut milk, no meats. In India is called  "Khichdi"

Me rememba dis meal. But did not remember its name. Thanks.  

Django, you rememba 'do-say' roti. Made from flour, sugar and water or milk ?

In GT, I was staying with a friend whose wife is from Mumbai. She made a small 'do-say' roti, but it had salt and pepper.

Indian restaurants  serve dosas. Maybe our "do say" roti came from that.

yuji22 posted:
caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

Berbicians  also put tomato sardine in their cook up.

Bai you know me don’t eat sardines. But that is true about Berbicians. 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

kp posted:
yuji22 posted:
caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

Berbicians  also put tomato sardine in their cook up.

That we did KP. It was New Brunswick sardines and we used the empty sardine tins as punts, or boats with a broom pointer and paper sail, to race each other in drains, after a rain fall.

We also used the empty sardine tins to make SAKAL-GATTA, a burnt brown sugar cookie.

When I did presentations at our children primary school regarding penfriends.  I would make a bunch of brown sugar cookies [SAKAL-GATTA]. I always do it in the afternoons, because I did not want to leave a bunch of unruly 'sugared' students with  a teacher.  

 

Tola posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:

What do you call those cups and plates that would flake off a piece, if it dropped or hit on hard surface ?   

They were enameled plates and cups.

Thanks everyone for all this, its very educational. My life was isolated from Guyanese culture for many decades with a Canadian family  and I forget many of these things.

CARIBNY, our African store is operated by Denise from Ghana, I have to share a lot more about our Guyanese culture with her.  

Django, Thanks.  I could not remember the make of the plates and cups.

But I do remember hitting sheep and goats at the school water well, who try to get into our food dish, while washing and bits would fake off.

Based on what we eat, we owe our Afro Brothers and Sisters a big thank you. We are fortunate that we have we have Indo and Afro meals combined. No wonder dem Indian people at our temple love it when Indo Guyanese cook. Dem rass does fetch plate plate when Guyanese cook. 

Me only like a few of their foods, I prefer my Guyanese food. My daughter cannot live without Guyanese food. She says, me don’t want white People food. 

yuji22 posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

Yuji, the Afro families also 'borrowed' many Indian dishes.

I have Afro friends here from Linden, whom make the best dhall and rice with shrimp/okro side dish.  

Tola posted:
yuji22 posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

Yuji, the Afro families also 'borrowed' many Indian dishes.

I have Afro friends here from Linden, whom make the best dhall and rice with shrimp/okro side dish.  

That’s what make Guyanese the MOST unique people in the world. Burnham and Cheddi split is up politically. Other than that we fine. 

We does argue and fight but I Never allow anyone to eye pass my Guyanese Brothers and Sisters. 

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

indeed drugb, the only thing NOT “questionable” is your ineffable DUNCENESS

Let me help your poor education here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/do...7/096746080000700201

THE AFRICAN ORIGINS OF CAROLINA RICE CULTURE by Judith Carney

“. . . The Governor Sir William [Berkeley], caused half a bushel of Rice (which he had procured) to be sowen, and it prospered gallantly and he had fifteen bushels of it, excellent good Rice, so that all those fifteen bushels will be sowen again this year; and we doubt not in a short time to have Rice so plentiful as to afford it at 2d a pound if not cheaper, for we perceive the ground and Climate is very proper for it as our Negroes affirme, which in their Country is most of their food, and very health-ful for our bodies.

. . . An examination of rice cooking provides additional evidence for the transmission of a female knowledge system from Africa to South Carolina. Despite the familiar logo of Uncle Ben on the converted rice marketed by that name in the United States, it was African women who perfected rice cooking in a distinctive manner that characterizes both African and Carolinian culinary traditions. The objective was to prepare dishes to prevent rice from clumping together, as in the Asian style, a plate where every grain remained separate. The method involved steaming and absorption, boiling rice first for 10-15 minutes, draining off excess water, removing the pan from direct heat for the grains to absorb the moisture, and leaving the pot covered for at least an hour before eating. This is the same manner in which rice is traditionally prepared throughout the West African rice region, where wood is scarce for cooking and the task for its procurement often the additional responsibility of women. A similar method of cooking rice is found in other areas of the African diaspora, for example among descendants of Saramaka maroons in Surinam who fled coastal sugar plantations for freedom during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.”

SO MUCH NONSENSE FROM DONKEYS TO DEBUNK . . . SO LITTLE TIME

SMFH

Tola posted:
kp posted:
yuji22 posted:
caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

Berbicians  also put tomato sardine in their cook up.

That we did KP. It was New Brunswick sardines and we used the empty sardine tins as punts, or boats with a broom pointer and paper sail, to race each other in drains, after a rain fall.

We also used the empty sardine tins to make SAKAL-GATTA, a burnt brown sugar cookie.

When I did presentations at our children primary school regarding penfriends.  I would make a bunch of brown sugar cookies [SAKAL-GATTA]. I always do it in the afternoons, because I did not want to leave a bunch of unruly 'sugared' students with  a teacher.  

 

Berbicians also cook sijan leaves ,we in WCD curry the sijan sticks.

Saijan stick curry is so good, my wife cooks it with eddoes.  I had that yesterday. 

The saijan leaves are chopped up and we usually cook it using coconut milk.

Wow, we Guyanese are amazing with the amount of meals that are so unique. Vish better take note of these meals.

He rass go get bassidy when we start talking bout Ghoja, Pera, Gata etc. 

ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

indeed drugb, the only thing NOT “questionable” is your ineffable DUNCENESS

Let me help your poor education here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/do...7/096746080000700201

THE AFRICAN ORIGINS OF CAROLINA RICE CULTURE by Judith Carney

“. . . The Governor Sir William [Berkeley], caused half a bushel of Rice (which he had procured) to be sowen, and it prospered gallantly and he had fifteen bushels of it, excellent good Rice, so that all those fifteen bushels will be sowen again this year; and we doubt not in a short time to have Rice so plentiful as to afford it at 2d a pound if not cheaper, for we perceive the ground and Climate is very proper for it as our Negroes affirme, which in their Country is most of their food, and very health-ful for our bodies.

. . . An examination of rice cooking provides additional evidence for the transmission of a female knowledge system from Africa to South Carolina. Despite the familiar logo of Uncle Ben on the converted rice marketed by that name in the United States, it was African women who perfected rice cooking in a distinctive manner that characterizes both African and Carolinian culinary traditions. The objective was to prepare dishes to prevent rice from clumping together, as in the Asian style, a plate where every grain remained separate. The method involved steaming and absorption, boiling rice first for 10-15 minutes, draining off excess water, removing the pan from direct heat for the grains to absorb the moisture, and leaving the pot covered for at least an hour before eating. This is the same manner in which rice is traditionally prepared throughout the West African rice region, where wood is scarce for cooking and the task for its procurement often the additional responsibility of women. A similar method of cooking rice is found in other areas of the African diaspora, for example among descendants of Saramaka maroons in Surinam who fled coastal sugar plantations for freedom during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.”

SO MUCH NONSENSE FROM DONKEYS TO DEBUNK . . . SO LITTLE TIME

SMFH

Tell me what Drugb said was wrong,  he stated that Traditionally rice is an Asian food. Well what is wrong?  You pick something up from the Internet and post with out relevance. 

yuji22 posted:

Saijan stick curry is so good, my wife cooks it with eddoes.  I had that yesterday. 

The saijan leaves are chopped up and we usually cook it using coconut milk.

Wow, we Guyanese are amazing with the amount of meals that are so unique. Vish better take note of these meals.

He rass go get bassidy when we start talking bout Ghoja, Pera, Gata etc. 

Well if he got a white woman he will starve. So he can take all the notes but he needs a good cook.

yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook Up originated on the plantations during the days of slavery.  Rations were scarce and time was limited as the slaves worked long days. So to save on both, people would put their ingredients into one one pot and cook. Over time that dish evolved with the addition of seasonings and different types of meats, peas, etc. into the delicacy we know today.

Dave posted:
Django posted:

With all the different Guyanese dishes most of the ingredients are in Guyana locally,except flour,split peas and salt.

How will we starve ?

There was rice, onion and salt, also fresh cow milk and rice with sugar. 

How about mar ,rice, with some chipped onions or shallot ,wiri wiri peppers and pinch of salt,it's got to be hot.

yuji22 posted:
Dave posted:

Does Vish knows after 6 PM he enter his home the reverse way and don’t sweep the dust out the house after 6 PM. 

He rass better know about Jumbie and Obeah Man now. 

Moon Gazer  and Baccoo

kp posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

indeed drugb, the only thing NOT “questionable” is your ineffable DUNCENESS

Let me help your poor education here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/do...7/096746080000700201

THE AFRICAN ORIGINS OF CAROLINA RICE CULTURE by Judith Carney

“. . . The Governor Sir William [Berkeley], caused half a bushel of Rice (which he had procured) to be sowen, and it prospered gallantly and he had fifteen bushels of it, excellent good Rice, so that all those fifteen bushels will be sowen again this year; and we doubt not in a short time to have Rice so plentiful as to afford it at 2d a pound if not cheaper, for we perceive the ground and Climate is very proper for it as our Negroes affirme, which in their Country is most of their food, and very health-ful for our bodies.

. . . An examination of rice cooking provides additional evidence for the transmission of a female knowledge system from Africa to South Carolina. Despite the familiar logo of Uncle Ben on the converted rice marketed by that name in the United States, it was African women who perfected rice cooking in a distinctive manner that characterizes both African and Carolinian culinary traditions. The objective was to prepare dishes to prevent rice from clumping together, as in the Asian style, a plate where every grain remained separate. The method involved steaming and absorption, boiling rice first for 10-15 minutes, draining off excess water, removing the pan from direct heat for the grains to absorb the moisture, and leaving the pot covered for at least an hour before eating. This is the same manner in which rice is traditionally prepared throughout the West African rice region, where wood is scarce for cooking and the task for its procurement often the additional responsibility of women. A similar method of cooking rice is found in other areas of the African diaspora, for example among descendants of Saramaka maroons in Surinam who fled coastal sugar plantations for freedom during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.”

SO MUCH NONSENSE FROM DONKEYS TO DEBUNK . . . SO LITTLE TIME

SMFH

Tell me what Drugb said was wrong,  he stated that Traditionally rice is an Asian food. Well what is wrong?  You pick something up from the Internet and post with out relevance. 

instead of the usual, ignorant pout when confronted with inconvenient FACTS, if you took time to actually read my post, your 'question' would have been long answered

now, what exactly about "the internet" you got a problem with?

ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

indeed drugb, the only thing NOT “questionable” is your ineffable DUNCENESS

Let me help your poor education here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/do...7/096746080000700201

THE AFRICAN ORIGINS OF CAROLINA RICE CULTURE by Judith Carney

“. . . The Governor Sir William [Berkeley], caused half a bushel of Rice (which he had procured) to be sowen, and it prospered gallantly and he had fifteen bushels of it, excellent good Rice, so that all those fifteen bushels will be sowen again this year; and we doubt not in a short time to have Rice so plentiful as to afford it at 2d a pound if not cheaper, for we perceive the ground and Climate is very proper for it as our Negroes affirme, which in their Country is most of their food, and very health-ful for our bodies.

. . . An examination of rice cooking provides additional evidence for the transmission of a female knowledge system from Africa to South Carolina. Despite the familiar logo of Uncle Ben on the converted rice marketed by that name in the United States, it was African women who perfected rice cooking in a distinctive manner that characterizes both African and Carolinian culinary traditions. The objective was to prepare dishes to prevent rice from clumping together, as in the Asian style, a plate where every grain remained separate. The method involved steaming and absorption, boiling rice first for 10-15 minutes, draining off excess water, removing the pan from direct heat for the grains to absorb the moisture, and leaving the pot covered for at least an hour before eating. This is the same manner in which rice is traditionally prepared throughout the West African rice region, where wood is scarce for cooking and the task for its procurement often the additional responsibility of women. A similar method of cooking rice is found in other areas of the African diaspora, for example among descendants of Saramaka maroons in Surinam who fled coastal sugar plantations for freedom during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.”

SO MUCH NONSENSE FROM DONKEYS TO DEBUNK . . . SO LITTLE TIME

SMFH

Drugb dunceness aside, he REAL intent was to portray Africans as not being able to sustain themselves outside of help from other races (in this case Asian/Indian). In other words, "black man would starve if it wasn't fuh abie". It should sound familiar. That is the nasty racist we dealing wid in de man name Drugb. Little did he know it was Africans that taught the Asians how to handle rice. SMFH.

kp posted:
yuji22 posted:
Dave posted:

Does Vish knows after 6 PM he enter his home the reverse way and don’t sweep the dust out the house after 6 PM. 

He rass better know about Jumbie and Obeah Man now. 

Moon Gazer  and Baccoo

Wait until he hears about (Berbician Fire Rass) and Village Master.

He will pee his pants if he reads one page of the IndraJal. This one is for real.

Iguana posted:

Drugb dunceness aside, he REAL intent was to portray Africans as not being able to sustain themselves outside of help from other races (in this case Asian/Indian). In other words, "black man would starve if it wasn't fuh abie". It should sound familiar. That is the nasty racist we dealing wid in de man name Drugb. Little did he know it was Africans that taught the Asians how to handle rice. SMFH.

i know druggie's MO is to try tek a piss pan blackman with any 'opportunity' he can manufacture

but he prappa DUNCE in not knowing that rice was a staple in the culture and diet of West African peoples for millennia before slavery and Indian indenture in the Americas. . . note his "cookup minus the rice" sneer

this is not to gainsay the huge impact of a highly developed, sophisticated cuisine brought to countries like Guyana from India and East Asia that we all enjoy

indeed, that cuisine can properly be said to have brought fundamental, transformative changes in the eating habits of former colonial masters in Western Europe . . . after all, the violent scramble by Europe for spices from the East is what started the voyages of exploration that led us to what and where we are today

yuji22 posted:
kp posted:
yuji22 posted:
Dave posted:

Does Vish knows after 6 PM he enter his home the reverse way and don’t sweep the dust out the house after 6 PM. 

He rass better know about Jumbie and Obeah Man now. 

Moon Gazer  and Baccoo

Wait until he hears about (Berbician Fire Rass) and Village Master.

He will pee his pants if he reads one page of the IndraJal. This one is for real.

 Me did  not hear about  Village Master, but Old Albion had many Fire Rass, that suck blood on the neck from pregnant women, while they sleep.

They first had to remove their skin and hide it, before their Fire Rassing at night would wuk.

In our logie kitchen, we had  large jar of ground Balla Fire pepper, that was used to rub on the skin of the Fire  Rass.  Next day if we see a  person in our village with blisters on their skin, we will know they were a Fire Rass the night before.

In North America,  me did not see any  Fire Rass, but there were lots of blood sucking lawyers  and politicians.  

cain posted:

So its a tinin cup you talkin bout.

Long before me used tin or aluminum cups, we took enamel cups for the school milk/cookies breakfast feeding program.  I believe it was a US Aid program with two hands shaking each other on the large powder milk bag.

Pieces of the  enamel would flake off if the cup is dropped or hit a hard surface. The enamel coated the metal design of the cup and plate. The cup is usually useable, but it will have flakes of enamel off  the cup.      

After reading the dialogue here as a Georgetown born and raised I can say I know of all and some of what was not mentioned about food and it's infusion into the Guyanese culture, Most of this information is going by the wayside due to lack of interest by the younger generation. What I see now in Guyana is that of a eat out take out food culture. On a visit I was invited to dinner by an old school friend I got there at 6.30 pm as agreed upon time, he offered me a drink and after a few he pulled out his cell phone and ordered food from the Chinese restaurant he also asked his wife and kids what they wanted to eat, I did not expect this. Anyway Tola the sardine that I remember that was used in the cookup was Marshalls sardines in tomato sauce.   

  

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