Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Last edited by Django
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years"

https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdf

We note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan.

Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

Iguana posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years"

https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdf

We note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan.

Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

Teach them bhai, they think the dealing with mediocre. There was a thread on rice on GNI.

Django posted:
Iguana posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years"

https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdf

We note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan.

Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

Teach them bhai, they think the dealing with mediocre. There was a thread on rice on GNI.

You need some Dhal.

Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

i recall as a lil bai feeling for fish with my cousins in the flooded rice field

we would advance in a horizontal line picking up mud and spraying it up ahead to blind the fish as we feel out and grab them . . . mostly tilapia

and yes, hunting for buck crab was the most exciting/exotic on the coastal mud flats in WCB especially since they were such a delicacy . . . cooked in coconut milk, yesss bai

me nat only live in town

Rice is grown in Africa.  During  water drilling projects, oxen and ploughs were given to  farmers to grown their food, including rice. 

American slaves who might come from the same place as Guyanese slaves, took their traditions and food  where they were taken.   Cook-up is not only a Guyanese food.

We have a story telling club called Baloney on Bologna. It goes better with mustard.  

Instead of sitting behind a computer or use Google,  some on GNI needs to get off their ass and travel to areas, that is not for tourist.   

Tola posted:

American slaves who might come from the same place as Guyanese slaves, took their traditions and food  where they were taken.   Cook-up is not only a Guyanese food.

Yes, they came from West Africa, where rice was grown for over 3000 years. In fact the Asians learnt from the Africans how to make the rice so it wouldn't clump together. As Carib pointed out, West Africans brought Joloff rice to Guyana which later morphed into our cookup rice.

ronan posted:
Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

i recall as a lil bai feeling for fish with my cousins in the flooded rice field

we would advance in a horizontal line picking up mud and spraying it up ahead to blind the fish as we feel out and grab them . . . mostly tilapia

and yes, hunting for buck crab was the most exciting/exotic on the coastal mud flats in WCB especially since they were such a delicacy . . . cooked in coconut milk, yesss bai

me nat only live in town

We had two rice fields rented from Albion sugar estate. Bailing wata was me job. Feeling fa fish and crecketta , while spraying some mud ahead,  made for a good meal afterwards.

The memory of sitting on top of the pole as a boy, while cows were mashing rice, saved me from  depression when my sister was murdered.  

ronan posted:

we would advance in a horizontal line picking up mud and spraying it up ahead to blind the fish as we feel out and grab them . . . mostly tilapia

Ronan,

the local fish in rice fields look like below, that's the type of i know of,or probably tilapia was raised in the rice fields.

Aequidens chimantanus

https://www.fishbase.de/identi....php?genus=Aequidens

Tola posted:

We had two rice fields rented from Albion sugar estate. Bailing wata was me job. Feeling fa fish and crecketta , while spraying some mud ahead,  made for a good meal afterwards.

The memory of sitting on top of the pole as a boy, while cows were mashing rice, saved me from  depression when my sister was murdered.  

Tola, did they curry the creckette? I think our indian neighbors once made creckete curry. I ate some, but honestly did not know what it was.

Django posted:
ronan posted:

we would advance in a horizontal line picking up mud and spraying it up ahead to blind the fish as we feel out and grab them . . . mostly tilapia

Ronan,

the local fish in rice fields look like below, that's the type of i know of,or probably tilapia was raised in the rice fields.

Aequidens chimantanus

https://www.fishbase.de/identi....php?genus=Aequidens

that's the type i remember . . . not being wan fish expert, all dem that look like dat is "tilapia" to me

Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

Tola, you coolies say bandin. We inglishman say "fallow". That's right, the fields are flooded and rested during the fallow process. When planting resumes after draining the fields, dem suga cane does be sweet and juicy fo real.

Last edited by Former Member
Iguana posted:
Tola posted:

We had two rice fields rented from Albion sugar estate. Bailing wata was me job. Feeling fa fish and crecketta , while spraying some mud ahead,  made for a good meal afterwards.

The memory of sitting on top of the pole as a boy, while cows were mashing rice, saved me from  depression when my sister was murdered.  

Tola, did they curry the creckette? I think our indian neighbors once made creckete curry. I ate some, but honestly did not know what it was.

Iguana, I only remember it being fried and used as a side dish with dhall and rice. I don't remember having it curried.  

Gilbakka posted:

@Drugb

In 1992, I wrote an article on the history of the rice industry in Guyana. It appeared in "Farm World" magazine published by the Alesei Group of Companies. My research showed that rice cultivation was introduced by the Dutch in Essequibo in the 18th century. The original seed paddy was imported from North Carolina. The Dutch used African slave labour for rice cultivation in their Essequibo plantations.

Later, after slavery ended, after East Indians had completed their indentured contracts and got their own land, rice cultivation accelerated and made Guyana a rice EXPORTING colony.

In a nutshell, Afro labour started the local rice industry; Indos produced a surplus for export.

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

Iguana posted:
ronan posted:

that's the type i remember . . . not being wan fish expert, all dem that look like dat is "tilapia" to me

LOL. true dat. I remember going to red water creek by Sosedyke Linden highway and catching small fish fuh put in we homemade "aquarium". Sure enough, we called dem tilapia too ... lol.

Iguana, I was going to write a letter to Guyana news  editor about the scout Camp Jubilee  and Red Water Creek in the 1960s. I might post it here instead. 

Iguana posted:
LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years" https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdfWe note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan. Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

If you and the other joker were truthful, you would acknowledge that it is not the same rice that is used today, nor was it a staple of the African diet. An obscure grain that was produced in limited quantities, probably grown on the roadside and fed to farm animals. 

Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which have NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

Last edited by Former Member
Gilbakka posted:
Tola posted:
Labba posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:
caribny posted:

Also dasheen (both the root and the bush) and breadfruit were brought in from the Pacific to provide additional locally grown food sources for the enslaved peoples in the Americas.  I doubt that many Guyanese know this.

Thanks CARIB, I have not heard the word dasheen  for decades. Our mother used to prepare it for us.

Bhai, you stirring a lot of emotions hea and I am not a young kid.    

Tola,

Do you ever had  young tanya leaves  chopped up and cooked with coconut milk, that's the best.

I prefer tanya and eddoes any day before Irish potatoes, don't get them here.

Tania baji is de bess wid coconut milk and lil fresh wata shrimp like dem catchman shrimp. Dem man doan even gat that now in GY. Dem doers like Baseman and Yuji and Rev boast bout replace all de bandin with fertilizer. Dem Basemanite, Yujiite/Revite doers kill all de fresh shrimp and givin dem peoppkle cancer now. Hustlers, pushers, hucksters run de Guysuco and f it up. Dem man gat nuff nuff road sense...hey hey hey...like Jagdoe bai Raj Sing. Hey hey hey...

Django, I am so glad that you guys mention these names again that I forgot. My problem is, I live for decades with a Canadian family, isolated from other Guyanese.

There were twelve in  our family and we had  a  large kitchen garden at Old Albion, where our mother grew most everything.

I remember eating those things, but now I remember their names. 

Labba, BANDIN...is where the sugar cane field after a few crops is flooded for months and when the water is drained its called BANDIN.  Is it really AMBANDON.

When feeling for fish in the cane filed drains during bandin,  you ever grab an alligator or a snake.  We always keep the cutlass handy.

We catch  the best hassa during bandin and also when clapping our hands in the water near  a  hassa nest in the sugar cane field canals,  de fish would come right into our  hands. How about hassa eggs.

During season, there were thousands of buck crabs at Albion sea shore  and  we  pick only the big ones. They were  boiled in coconut milk and eaten. Other times we put our arms in a crab hole and grab the crab with a glove hand. That is  if the crab don't bite your finger first.    

Tola, you coolies say bandin. We inglishman say "fallow". That's right, the fields are flooded and rested during the fallow process. When planting resumes after draining the fields, dem suga cane does be sweet and juicy fo real.

Gil, I did not hear about the fallow  process. I understand it to be the same as bandin, but what  does fallow mean.

I have to go out for a while, but back soon.  

Drugb posted:
Iguana posted:
LOL....look at this pathetic effort to denigrate black people by this ignorant Dalit. Note the opening line hay Dalit - "Rice has been cultivated in West Africa for at least 3,000 years" https://www.odi.org/sites/odi....inion-files/4146.pdfWe note yuh convenient lack of comment on a link with similar facts posted by Ronan. Stick to eating dat steady diet of white man food yuh gettin' fed bai - baloney sandwich with lotsa mayo. LOL.

If you and the other joker were truthful, you would acknowledge that it is not the same rice that is used today, nor was it a staple of the African diet. An obscure grain that was produced in limited quantities, probably grown on the roadside and fed to farm animals. 

klown show . . . drugb swinging he bt

lol

ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

It was not a staple in Africa. An obscure regional crop and nothing near the variety used in cookup.

ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

Bhai, leave that chap alone, if he knows the history of Guyana, he would be aware how  rice planting was increased by East Indians.

Wanna bet he doesn't know the old varieties, before the new types was introduced.I grew up on a 3 acre rice farm.

There was a discussion about the old and new varieties of rice here on GNI.

Last edited by Django
Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

It was not a staple in Africa. An obscure regional crop and nothing near the variety used in cookup.

jackass, "AFRICA" is a huge continent populated by many ethno/racial groups

WEST AFRICA, a sub continent-size area, is the region where most of the Black peoples of the Caribbean find their roots

not South Africa, not East Africa, etc.

THAT "region" is where rice was historically an extremely important food crop way before the depradations of the slave trade

btw, your bt shaking doan impress anybody . . . you know absolutely  NOTHING about rice "varieties" or anything even remotely agro-botanical

however, even for a dunce like you, there is still time to get a proper education

arite?

Last edited by Former Member
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

It was not a staple in Africa. An obscure regional crop and nothing near the variety used in cookup.

jackass, "AFRICA" is a huge continent populated by many ethno/racial groups

WEST AFRICA, a sub continent-size area, is the region where most of the Black peoples of the Caribbean find their roots

not South Africa, not East Africa, etc.

THAT "region" is where rice was historically an extremely important food crop way before the depradations of the slave trade

btw, your bt shaking doan impress anybody . . . you know absolutely  NOTHING about rice "varieties" or anything even remotely agro-botanical

however, even for a dunce like you, there is still time to get a proper education

arite?

Dem afroG didn't know anything about rice cultivation. Is the white man teach them at the end of a whip. Then the Indians came and showed them how it could be done commercially. Look at who the rice farmers are in Guyana, 99.999% indos, that should tell you something. I remember when Bunham, another dunce, tried to force blacks to cultivate rice on the east coast and miserably failed during the 70's. 

Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:

Gilly, I am not disputing that Afro labor was used to plant rice in limited quantities, after all they were slaves and did their masters bidding. What I question is which group really proliferated rice production to its current importance as an export crop today in Guyana. You will acknowledge that it was the Indo's that did this as evidence by the dearth of rice farmers today in Guyana. The ronans and caibjs will shout all day about how Blacks was responsible for man going to the moon and the cure for cancer, but history will tell a different story. 

LIARD nonsense

no one EVER disputed that fact! . . . and the historical/economic reasons for this which has NOTHING to do with race

nice try at moving the goal posts moron

now, let's swing back to this idiot business of yours that rice was not a major crop in "Africa" . . . hmmm? 

It was not a staple in Africa. An obscure regional crop and nothing near the variety used in cookup.

jackass, "AFRICA" is a huge continent populated by many ethno/racial groups

WEST AFRICA, a sub continent-size area, is the region where most of the Black peoples of the Caribbean find their roots

not South Africa, not East Africa, etc.

THAT "region" is where rice was historically an extremely important food crop way before the depradations of the slave trade

btw, your bt shaking doan impress anybody . . . you know absolutely  NOTHING about rice "varieties" or anything even remotely agro-botanical

however, even for a dunce like you, there is still time to get a proper education

arite?

Dem afroG didn't know anything about rice cultivation. Is the white man teach them at the end of a whip. Then the Indians came and showed them how it could be done commercially. Look at who the rice farmers are in Guyana, 99.999% indos, that should tell you something. I remember when Bunham, another dunce, tried to force blacks to cultivate rice on the east coast and miserably failed during the 70's. 

shakeabatty, how exactly does the non-sequitur vomit you deposited above constitute a response to my post?

Last edited by Former Member