Tola posted:
yuji22 posted:
kp posted:
yuji22 posted:
Dave posted:

Does Vish knows after 6 PM he enter his home the reverse way and don’t sweep the dust out the house after 6 PM. 

He rass better know about Jumbie and Obeah Man now. 

Moon Gazer  and Baccoo

Wait until he hears about (Berbician Fire Rass) and Village Master.

He will pee his pants if he reads one page of the IndraJal. This one is for real.

 Me did  not hear about  Village Master, but Old Albion had many Fire Rass, that suck blood on the neck from pregnant women, while they sleep.

They first had to remove their skin and hide it, before their Fire Rassing at night would wuk.

In our logie kitchen, we had  large jar of ground Balla Fire pepper, that was used to rub on the skin of the Fire  Rass.  Next day if we see a  person in our village with blisters on their skin, we will know they were a Fire Rass the night before.

In North America,  me did not see any  Fire Rass, but there were lots of blood sucking lawyers  and politicians.  

I heard New Yorkers mentioning Fire Rass. Never heard it being mentioned here, maybe Canada is too cold for them to exist. Regarding Village Master, villages along the Corentyne used to make an annual sacrifice for a Village Master (deceased Dutch Man). Practised by an older generation. I think that it is no longer practised.

My village had an old Dutch cemetery. 

Last edited by Former Member
Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:
kp posted:
Tola posted:

 

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

Growing up I always knew that as Methem or Metagee.

Metemgee is made with coconut milk. If we make it without the coconut milk, we call it dry food. I’ve heard people also call it hard food or you can fry it and call it boil and fry.

Most times we make metemgee, we use saltfish instead of meat.

We call it Boil and Fry. Fried salt fish, stew fish, or any curry with gravy goes well with it. 

Vish started his thread and disappeared. Did someone say he and Vishnu Mahadeo are the same? 

Leonora posted:
Mars posted:
GTAngler posted:
kp posted:
Tola posted:

 

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

Growing up I always knew that as Methem or Metagee.

Metemgee is made with coconut milk. If we make it without the coconut milk, we call it dry food. I’ve heard people also call it hard food or you can fry it and call it boil and fry.

Most times we make metemgee, we use saltfish instead of meat.

We call it Boil and Fry. Fried salt fish, stew fish, or any curry with gravy goes well with it. 

Vish started his thread and disappeared. Did someone say he and Vishnu Mahadeo are the same? 

No they aren't, I know Vishnu Mahadeo and his parents long, long time ago.

Leonora posted:
cain posted:

Too many Vish's rass...gotta start numbering 'em. Vish1..Vish2

Someone said VishMahabir is Vijay Puran. 

VJ Puran is a very bright man. He is  our age or bit older...probably in late fifties or early sixties now...an electrical engineer with a masters degree. He lives in Albany and work for the electrical grid in NY state.  His brother is the lawyer who died ( or was killed ) in Guyana...defended mainly drug people. VJ's only problem is he believes he is the new elite and the rest of us ought to pay homage....like stupid Ugli except brilliant.  

 

 

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice.

The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Iguana posted:
 

Y'all doan like Carib because he points out the racist, Hindutva supremacist shit.

Funny they call me a racist when in fact I point out the aspects of creole culture that has origins in India, words used daily, like pagalee.

To the Indo KKK those who don't subscribe to their Hindutva views are racists which is why they loved how Modi behaved before being the head of state forced him to become more moderate.

caribny posted:
Aaah drugb ignorant as ever.  Do you know that American slave owners imported enslaved peoples from parts of West Africa because of their skill in growing rice.  Yes that famous Uncle Ben's rice. The first people involved in growing rice in Guyana were blacks, so yes cook up rice and its equivalent Jolloff rice, is "black man food".

Incorrect, rice was never prevalent in Africa. The staple was ground provisions, not rice. The white man taught the Afro's in the US how to grow rice using a technique that involved a whip.  Why you bring in the American blacks is beyond me, we are talking about cookup, a Guyanese food.

Even in Guyana, it was the Indos who first successfully grew rice in commercial quantities. The afros didn't have the know how to do it successfully,. 

Iguana posted:
 To me, salt beef cookup was de best.

Pig tail for me.  They cook it in some of the islands too.  the salt meats being from slavery days as it was imported from Canada and added to the rice, corn meal or ground provision based diets of the enslaved people.

Last edited by caribny
yuji22 posted:
 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

No they borrowed a different rice dish, just as blacks learned how curry and then later on to make roti/dhal puri.  Different way of cooking meats and  Guyana's first "fast food", good for lunch.

kp posted:
 

Berbicians  also put tomato sardine in their cook up.

Yes that brings it to the Joloff rice from the far western parts of West Africa.  This was probably brought in by the Kru, who were among the last Africans into BG, coming in after slavery ended.  They were originally brought in to grow rice.

yuji22 posted:

 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

Yes.  Cassava and corn are interested.  Brought in from the Americas to Europe and spreading to Africa, and then re-imported back to the Americas when the Africans enslaved peoples arrived.

caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

Yes.  Cassava and corn are interested.  Brought in from the Americas to Europe and spreading to Africa, and then re-imported back to the Americas when the Africans enslaved peoples arrived.

Thanks Carib G.

kp posted:
 

Tell me what Drugb said was wrong,  he stated that Traditionally rice is an Asian food. Well what is wrong?  You pick something up from the Internet and post with out relevance. 

His implication was that its only when Indians arrived that rice was used in Guyanese cooking. 

If he wants to get technical then he needs to refer to SOUTHEAST Asia because this is where most tropical edible foods originated. Not India.  By the time the Americas was settled by Euro/African peoples these foods had spread from Africa to the far reaches of the Pacific and foods like coconuts even to the Americas, carried their by ocean currents.

Corn, taken to the Americas by Columbus, became a core part of the diet of Africans long before many of these peoples began to have sustained contact with Europeans.

Last edited by caribny
yuji22 posted:
caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

Yes.  Cassava and corn are interested.  Brought in from the Americas to Europe and spreading to Africa, and then re-imported back to the Americas when the Africans enslaved peoples arrived.

Thanks Carib G.

You're welcome.  Good lessons I think for all of us.  Learned our prevalent cooking with coconut milk is.

caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:
 

Based on what we eat, we owe our Afro Brothers and Sisters a big thank you. We are fortunate that we have we have Indo and Afro meals combined.

And also the Amerindian, British, Chinese and Portuguese influences.  No wonder some one asked why Guyanese food isn't more popular in NYC.

Of course Guyanese are too low profile in NYC.  How many people know that there are more Guyanese in NYC than Haitians?

I can find upscale Jamaican influenced restaurants in NYC aimed at non Caribbean people.  I know a Guyanese woman who tried to do this in the 80s in the Village but her project failed as people didn't know what to expect and she lacked a liquor license. 

But with the vast repertoire of cultures that she had to draw from those who did go to the restaurant didn't want to leave.

caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

 

I wonder if the vegetable soup that we make is also of African origin ? We use eddoes, cassava, plantains, etc in our soup. I have that every single week. 

Yes.  Cassava and corn are interested.  Brought in from the Americas to Europe and spreading to Africa, and then re-imported back to the Americas when the Africans enslaved peoples arrived.

Why was cassava and corn had to be re imported when there is a consistent tradition of these products as the staple diet of native peoples from tierral del fuego to the north west of the Americas ( for corn)? There is no tradition of a break and a move to another product and a return to maize and cassava later?