caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

Last edited by Former Member
caribny posted:
Iguana posted:
GTAngler posted:

Tried making souse with chicken feet the other day. Must have missed a step. Friggin thing came out tasteless. Then again was a Trini recipe. Back to meh Guyanese Cook Book.

Yes, you missed a step. Yuh gaffo TEEF de chicken from yuh neighba. Den de souse duz come out nice and sweet.

Never associated souse with Trinis.  I think it was brought to Guyana by the Bajans, another British to creole adaptation.

Y'all rememba dis song? lol

https://youtu.be/ZqWLwZIncec

https://youtu.be/ZqWLwZIncec

 

Last edited by Former Member
Django posted:
Tola posted:

What do you call those cups and plates that would flake off a piece, if it dropped or hit on hard surface ?   

They were enameled plates and cups.

Thanks everyone for all this, its very educational. My life was isolated from Guyanese culture for many decades with a Canadian family  and I forget many of these things.

CARIBNY, our African store is operated by Denise from Ghana, I have to share a lot more about our Guyanese culture with her.  

Django, Thanks.  I could not remember the make of the plates and cups.

But I do remember hitting sheep and goats at the school water well, who try to get into our food dish, while washing and bits would fake off.

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

Last edited by Former Member
GTAngler posted:
kp posted:
Tola posted:

 

My father prepared and enjoyed 'dry-food', maybe originated by Africans, but I don't know how it started ?     It was large pieces of vegetables and meat, with no gravy.    

Your father made Metemgee.

Growing up I always knew that as Methem or Metagee.

Metemgee is made with coconut milk. If we make it without the coconut milk, we call it dry food. I’ve heard people also call it hard food or you can fry it and call it boil and fry.

Most times we make metemgee, we use saltfish instead of meat.

Tola posted:
Django posted:

How about "Kechree" boiled rice,split peas, salt ,onions , bhagee and coconut milk, no meats. In India is called  "Khichdi"

Me rememba dis meal. But did not remember its name. Thanks.  

Django, you rememba 'do-say' roti. Made from flour, sugar and water or milk ?

In GT, I was staying with a friend whose wife is from Mumbai. She made a small 'do-say' roti, but it had salt and pepper.

Indian restaurants  serve dosas. Maybe our "do say" roti came from that.

yuji22 posted:
caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

Berbicians  also put tomato sardine in their cook up.

kp posted:
yuji22 posted:
caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

Berbicians  also put tomato sardine in their cook up.

That we did KP. It was New Brunswick sardines and we used the empty sardine tins as punts, or boats with a broom pointer and paper sail, to race each other in drains, after a rain fall.

We also used the empty sardine tins to make SAKAL-GATTA, a burnt brown sugar cookie.

When I did presentations at our children primary school regarding penfriends.  I would make a bunch of brown sugar cookies [SAKAL-GATTA]. I always do it in the afternoons, because I did not want to leave a bunch of unruly 'sugared' students with  a teacher.  

 

Tola posted:
Django posted:
Tola posted:

What do you call those cups and plates that would flake off a piece, if it dropped or hit on hard surface ?   

They were enameled plates and cups.

Thanks everyone for all this, its very educational. My life was isolated from Guyanese culture for many decades with a Canadian family  and I forget many of these things.

CARIBNY, our African store is operated by Denise from Ghana, I have to share a lot more about our Guyanese culture with her.  

Django, Thanks.  I could not remember the make of the plates and cups.

But I do remember hitting sheep and goats at the school water well, who try to get into our food dish, while washing and bits would fake off.

Based on what we eat, we owe our Afro Brothers and Sisters a big thank you. We are fortunate that we have we have Indo and Afro meals combined. No wonder dem Indian people at our temple love it when Indo Guyanese cook. Dem rass does fetch plate plate when Guyanese cook. 

Me only like a few of their foods, I prefer my Guyanese food. My daughter cannot live without Guyanese food. She says, me don’t want white People food. 

yuji22 posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

Yuji, the Afro families also 'borrowed' many Indian dishes.

I have Afro friends here from Linden, whom make the best dhall and rice with shrimp/okro side dish.  

Tola posted:
yuji22 posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

It looks like abie Indo foreparents borrowed the cook up from our Afro Brothers and added rice to it. 

Yuji, the Afro families also 'borrowed' many Indian dishes.

I have Afro friends here from Linden, whom make the best dhall and rice with shrimp/okro side dish.  

That’s what make Guyanese the MOST unique people in the world. Burnham and Cheddi split is up politically. Other than that we fine. 

We does argue and fight but I Never allow anyone to eye pass my Guyanese Brothers and Sisters. 

Last edited by Former Member
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

indeed drugb, the only thing NOT “questionable” is your ineffable DUNCENESS

Let me help your poor education here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/do...7/096746080000700201

THE AFRICAN ORIGINS OF CAROLINA RICE CULTURE by Judith Carney

“. . . The Governor Sir William [Berkeley], caused half a bushel of Rice (which he had procured) to be sowen, and it prospered gallantly and he had fifteen bushels of it, excellent good Rice, so that all those fifteen bushels will be sowen again this year; and we doubt not in a short time to have Rice so plentiful as to afford it at 2d a pound if not cheaper, for we perceive the ground and Climate is very proper for it as our Negroes affirme, which in their Country is most of their food, and very health-ful for our bodies.

. . . An examination of rice cooking provides additional evidence for the transmission of a female knowledge system from Africa to South Carolina. Despite the familiar logo of Uncle Ben on the converted rice marketed by that name in the United States, it was African women who perfected rice cooking in a distinctive manner that characterizes both African and Carolinian culinary traditions. The objective was to prepare dishes to prevent rice from clumping together, as in the Asian style, a plate where every grain remained separate. The method involved steaming and absorption, boiling rice first for 10-15 minutes, draining off excess water, removing the pan from direct heat for the grains to absorb the moisture, and leaving the pot covered for at least an hour before eating. This is the same manner in which rice is traditionally prepared throughout the West African rice region, where wood is scarce for cooking and the task for its procurement often the additional responsibility of women. A similar method of cooking rice is found in other areas of the African diaspora, for example among descendants of Saramaka maroons in Surinam who fled coastal sugar plantations for freedom during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.”

SO MUCH NONSENSE FROM DONKEYS TO DEBUNK . . . SO LITTLE TIME

SMFH

Last edited by Former Member
Tola posted:
kp posted:
yuji22 posted:
caribny posted:
yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook up rice evolved from the one pot dishes that are prevalent throughout all of the cultures that evolved out of plantation societies in the Americas.  It is related to the Joloff rice of West Africa and some also attribute influences from Spain.  Cooking with coconut milk was brought to the Americas by the Africans though these cooking styles are also prevalent in Asia.  I guess wherever coconut trees exist.

Thank you Carib. My children were asking and I wanted an honest answer. I never prepare it without coconut milk, that is a must have ingredient.

I will let them know tonight. 

Berbicians  also put tomato sardine in their cook up.

That we did KP. It was New Brunswick sardines and we used the empty sardine tins as punts, or boats with a broom pointer and paper sail, to race each other in drains, after a rain fall.

We also used the empty sardine tins to make SAKAL-GATTA, a burnt brown sugar cookie.

When I did presentations at our children primary school regarding penfriends.  I would make a bunch of brown sugar cookies [SAKAL-GATTA]. I always do it in the afternoons, because I did not want to leave a bunch of unruly 'sugared' students with  a teacher.  

 

Berbicians also cook sijan leaves ,we in WCD curry the sijan sticks.

Saijan stick curry is so good, my wife cooks it with eddoes.  I had that yesterday. 

The saijan leaves are chopped up and we usually cook it using coconut milk.

Wow, we Guyanese are amazing with the amount of meals that are so unique. Vish better take note of these meals.

He rass go get bassidy when we start talking bout Ghoja, Pera, Gata etc. 

Last edited by Former Member
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

indeed drugb, the only thing NOT “questionable” is your ineffable DUNCENESS

Let me help your poor education here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/do...7/096746080000700201

THE AFRICAN ORIGINS OF CAROLINA RICE CULTURE by Judith Carney

“. . . The Governor Sir William [Berkeley], caused half a bushel of Rice (which he had procured) to be sowen, and it prospered gallantly and he had fifteen bushels of it, excellent good Rice, so that all those fifteen bushels will be sowen again this year; and we doubt not in a short time to have Rice so plentiful as to afford it at 2d a pound if not cheaper, for we perceive the ground and Climate is very proper for it as our Negroes affirme, which in their Country is most of their food, and very health-ful for our bodies.

. . . An examination of rice cooking provides additional evidence for the transmission of a female knowledge system from Africa to South Carolina. Despite the familiar logo of Uncle Ben on the converted rice marketed by that name in the United States, it was African women who perfected rice cooking in a distinctive manner that characterizes both African and Carolinian culinary traditions. The objective was to prepare dishes to prevent rice from clumping together, as in the Asian style, a plate where every grain remained separate. The method involved steaming and absorption, boiling rice first for 10-15 minutes, draining off excess water, removing the pan from direct heat for the grains to absorb the moisture, and leaving the pot covered for at least an hour before eating. This is the same manner in which rice is traditionally prepared throughout the West African rice region, where wood is scarce for cooking and the task for its procurement often the additional responsibility of women. A similar method of cooking rice is found in other areas of the African diaspora, for example among descendants of Saramaka maroons in Surinam who fled coastal sugar plantations for freedom during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.”

SO MUCH NONSENSE FROM DONKEYS TO DEBUNK . . . SO LITTLE TIME

SMFH

Tell me what Drugb said was wrong,  he stated that Traditionally rice is an Asian food. Well what is wrong?  You pick something up from the Internet and post with out relevance. 

yuji22 posted:

Saijan stick curry is so good, my wife cooks it with eddoes.  I had that yesterday. 

The saijan leaves are chopped up and we usually cook it using coconut milk.

Wow, we Guyanese are amazing with the amount of meals that are so unique. Vish better take note of these meals.

He rass go get bassidy when we start talking bout Ghoja, Pera, Gata etc. 

Well if he got a white woman he will starve. So he can take all the notes but he needs a good cook.

yuji22 posted:

Does anyone know the origin of Cook up or All in One as it is called in Berbice ? 

Cook Up originated on the plantations during the days of slavery.  Rations were scarce and time was limited as the slaves worked long days. So to save on both, people would put their ingredients into one one pot and cook. Over time that dish evolved with the addition of seasonings and different types of meats, peas, etc. into the delicacy we know today.

Last edited by Bibi Haniffa
Dave posted:
Django posted:

With all the different Guyanese dishes most of the ingredients are in Guyana locally,except flour,split peas and salt.

How will we starve ?

There was rice, onion and salt, also fresh cow milk and rice with sugar. 

How about mar ,rice, with some chipped onions or shallot ,wiri wiri peppers and pinch of salt,it's got to be hot.

Last edited by Django
kp posted:
ronan posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
It is black man food though just as blacks learned how to cook curry chicken and some even roti some Indians also learned creole and Chinese Guyanese dishes.

This is questionable, as rice is traditionally an Asian food. Unless you are referring to cookup minus the rice. 

indeed drugb, the only thing NOT “questionable” is your ineffable DUNCENESS

Let me help your poor education here:

http://journals.sagepub.com/do...7/096746080000700201

THE AFRICAN ORIGINS OF CAROLINA RICE CULTURE by Judith Carney

“. . . The Governor Sir William [Berkeley], caused half a bushel of Rice (which he had procured) to be sowen, and it prospered gallantly and he had fifteen bushels of it, excellent good Rice, so that all those fifteen bushels will be sowen again this year; and we doubt not in a short time to have Rice so plentiful as to afford it at 2d a pound if not cheaper, for we perceive the ground and Climate is very proper for it as our Negroes affirme, which in their Country is most of their food, and very health-ful for our bodies.

. . . An examination of rice cooking provides additional evidence for the transmission of a female knowledge system from Africa to South Carolina. Despite the familiar logo of Uncle Ben on the converted rice marketed by that name in the United States, it was African women who perfected rice cooking in a distinctive manner that characterizes both African and Carolinian culinary traditions. The objective was to prepare dishes to prevent rice from clumping together, as in the Asian style, a plate where every grain remained separate. The method involved steaming and absorption, boiling rice first for 10-15 minutes, draining off excess water, removing the pan from direct heat for the grains to absorb the moisture, and leaving the pot covered for at least an hour before eating. This is the same manner in which rice is traditionally prepared throughout the West African rice region, where wood is scarce for cooking and the task for its procurement often the additional responsibility of women. A similar method of cooking rice is found in other areas of the African diaspora, for example among descendants of Saramaka maroons in Surinam who fled coastal sugar plantations for freedom during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.”

SO MUCH NONSENSE FROM DONKEYS TO DEBUNK . . . SO LITTLE TIME

SMFH

Tell me what Drugb said was wrong,  he stated that Traditionally rice is an Asian food. Well what is wrong?  You pick something up from the Internet and post with out relevance. 

instead of the usual, ignorant pout when confronted with inconvenient FACTS, if you took time to actually read my post, your 'question' would have been long answered

now, what exactly about "the internet" you got a problem with?