Please Mr. President… Who’re the people you pardoned – and what crimes did they commit

 

PRESIDENT David Granger announced on May 26, 2015, with much fanfare, the pardoning of 60 criminals whom he described as “young persons…” who were imprisoned “for petty non-violent offences.”Every year, going forward, on the nation’s birthday, Mr Granger intends to pardon more felons who may meet this criteria.
One month has elapsed, and all the Guyanese public knows about the released convicts is that the number of pardoned inmates were reduced from the original 60, and that a U.S. Government-backed project has embraced the convicts, and intends to reintegrate them back into our Guyanese society.
While this may appear, on the surface, as a noble cause, I am galled that the media, which was a humbug to the previous Administration, is allowing Mr Granger a free pass by ignoring the limited information that is being provided about:

1: Who these pardoned criminals are;

2: What constitutes “young persons”. Is a person in their 30s who is set in his/her ways considered ‘young’?

3: What constitutes “a short duration”.
These subjective terms being used by Mr Granger need to be questioned, and deserve an answer.
It is time the love fest and honeymoon between the new Administration and the media simmer down. As the fourth arm of Government, the media needs to examine Mr Granger’s rubric of who gets pardoned.
I recall, with trepidation, the cacophony of the Guyana Bar Association and Mr Burch-Smith, the Guyana Human Rights Association and the many other proxy cudgels of the previous Administration, when Mr Donald Ramotar pardoned Ravindra Deo. The silence of these organisations is now deafening with Mr Granger’s pardon. With Mr Ramotar’s pardon, at least we know who was released, and the gravity of his crime. Mr Granger has not given us that courtesy.
It was reported in some sections of the media that cell-phone thieves are being pardoned.
When I contemplate that ‘Presidential Pardons’ are the new dispensation of justice for short sentences, and for being a young criminal, I can’t help but feel empathy for the families such as that of Ms Sheema Mangar, who died after she was run over by car after chasing after the crooks who stole her cell-phone.
The new Administration campaigned on “It is time to end crime”. However, we are witnessing a surge in violent crimes under their watch. With crime surging uncontrollably, I would like to know who are being pardoned, and the nature of the crimes committed. What if I was a victim of crime that led to conviction and detention of one of the Granger-released thugs?
Mr Granger, please release the names of the pardoned criminals, and the nature of the crimes committed.
The media needs to do its job; demand the demographical and criminal records of the pardoned hoodlums.

OUTRAGED AND CONCERNED CITIZEN

Original Post

Other valid questions:

 

1. How many males, how many females?

2. What ages?

3. Urban or rural?

4. What's racial breakdown?

5. What are the crimes?

6. What are conditions of release? Would they be released again if they commit the same crimes again?

7. How did they come up with this list so quickly?  Did they go in with a list? 

8. Why was this a priority action? Is this part of the 100-day agenda?

9. What was process used to generate the list?  Who were consulted and were involved?

10. Did they inform the magistrates, police, persecutors, victims, witnesses against the criminals?

11. Will this boost the morale of law enforcement who would feel that all their efforts at law enforcement and securing convictions have been thrown in the trash, and they would not bother to charge people with similar crimes?

12. Does Granger understand that there is a close link between drug use and village crimes?  Drug users rob and kill people for money, and steal to buy drugs.

13. Is Granger trying out at being a dictator?

 

Where is Capitol News, KN, SN, Guyana Times, Chronicle, GT Mosquito, iNews and others when you need them to do investigative journalism?

Guys, here are a few things to think about.

The 49 youths who were released were serving time for petty non-violent offences, mainly robbery without violence, smoking a marijuana joint, etc.

These kids have a whole life ahead of them? Shouldn't they be rehabilitated and become productive law-abiding citizens? Or should we brand them as born criminals and neglect them?

I am for rehabilitation. I want those youths to be trained and offered jobs.

In Guyana, dirty labels stick for decades. If those youngsters' names are released to the public, which employer will want to hire them? Even if they're hired, would their co-workers treat them with due respect?

Give the kids a chance, guys. People make mistakes in life, but people can learn from their mistakes and move on.

I have a suspicion that some of those who're clamouring for the release of the 49 names are really salivating to see how many are Afros and how many are Indos. Truly a sad commentary on our Guyanese society.

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Guys, here are a few things to think about.

The 49 youths who were released were serving time for petty non-violent offences, mainly robbery without violence, smoking a marijuana joint, etc.

These kids have a whole life ahead of them? Shouldn't they be rehabilitated and become productive law-abiding citizens? Or should we brand them as born criminals and neglect them?

I am for rehabilitation. I want those youths to be trained and offered jobs.

In Guyana, dirty labels stick for decades. If those youngsters' names are released to the public, which employer will want to hire them? Even if they're hired, would their co-workers treat them with due respect?

Give the kids a chance, guys. People make mistakes in life, but people can learn from their mistakes and move on.

I have a suspicion that some of those who're clamouring for the release of the 49 names are really salivating to see how many are Afros and how many are Indos. Truly a sad commentary on our Guyanese society.

Kids don't be in jail Mr. Gilbaka they are put in juvenile centers.  Why don't you think the names should be released?  This should be public information in a democracy.  I don't have a problem with petty thieves being released but lets get the details.  Then we could tell also if the program and selection is working.  Because if these "kids" are the ones who continue the crime spree after release then we have a problem.

Last edited by VVP
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Guys, here are a few things to think about.

The 49 youths who were released were serving time for petty non-violent offences, mainly robbery without violence, smoking a marijuana joint, etc.

These kids have a whole life ahead of them? Shouldn't they be rehabilitated and become productive law-abiding citizens? Or should we brand them as born criminals and neglect them?

I am for rehabilitation. I want those youths to be trained and offered jobs.

In Guyana, dirty labels stick for decades. If those youngsters' names are released to the public, which employer will want to hire them? Even if they're hired, would their co-workers treat them with due respect?

Give the kids a chance, guys. People make mistakes in life, but people can learn from their mistakes and move on.

I have a suspicion that some of those who're clamouring for the release of the 49 names are really salivating to see how many are Afros and how many are Indos. Truly a sad commentary on our Guyanese society.

YOU ARE A CERTIFIED JACKASS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Originally Posted by Nehru:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Guys, here are a few things to think about.

The 49 youths who were released were serving time for petty non-violent offences, mainly robbery without violence, smoking a marijuana joint, etc.

These kids have a whole life ahead of them? Shouldn't they be rehabilitated and become productive law-abiding citizens? Or should we brand them as born criminals and neglect them?

I am for rehabilitation. I want those youths to be trained and offered jobs.

In Guyana, dirty labels stick for decades. If those youngsters' names are released to the public, which employer will want to hire them? Even if they're hired, would their co-workers treat them with due respect?

Give the kids a chance, guys. People make mistakes in life, but people can learn from their mistakes and move on.

I have a suspicion that some of those who're clamouring for the release of the 49 names are really salivating to see how many are Afros and how many are Indos. Truly a sad commentary on our Guyanese society.

YOU ARE A CERTIFIED JACKASS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 You are the jackass turd.

Anscale Fish is absolutely right. This is a minor non-issue of a limited exercise of the pardon power. Young adults or anyone for that matter deserve to not rot in jail for petty reasons. These were petty non violent mostly drug offenses. This is being raised as an issue because I'm almost certain most of the pardoned are Black. It's only important to some to find some nonsensical angle of this Government letting loose hordes of Black criminals to prey on innocent Indos.

Guyana is a small society where any record of "criminal activity" no matter how petty is a permanent Black mark.

Guyanese sentencing laws are quite draconian and in need of reform. A marijuana joint should not result in years of prison time.
Originally Posted by Jay Bharrat:

Other valid questions:

 

1. How many males, how many females?

2. What ages?

3. Urban or rural?

4. What's racial breakdown?

5. What are the crimes?

6. What are conditions of release? Would they be released again if they commit the same crimes again?

7. How did they come up with this list so quickly?  Did they go in with a list? 

8. Why was this a priority action? Is this part of the 100-day agenda?

9. What was process used to generate the list?  Who were consulted and were involved?

10. Did they inform the magistrates, police, persecutors, victims, witnesses against the criminals?

11. Will this boost the morale of law enforcement who would feel that all their efforts at law enforcement and securing convictions have been thrown in the trash, and they would not bother to charge people with similar crimes?

12. Does Granger understand that there is a close link between drug use and village crimes?  Drug users rob and kill people for money, and steal to buy drugs.

13. Is Granger trying out at being a dictator?

 

Where is Capitol News, KN, SN, Guyana Times, Chronicle, GT Mosquito, iNews and others when you need them to do investigative journalism?

What are you asking him those questions now Jay? You were one of the coalition's biggest supporters. Why don't you ask him if "where is this in his 100 day promise to the voters"? 

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Guys, here are a few things to think about.

The 49 youths who were released were serving time for petty non-violent offences, mainly robbery without violence, smoking a marijuana joint, etc.

These kids have a whole life ahead of them? Shouldn't they be rehabilitated and become productive law-abiding citizens? Or should we brand them as born criminals and neglect them?

I am for rehabilitation. I want those youths to be trained and offered jobs.

In Guyana, dirty labels stick for decades. If those youngsters' names are released to the public, which employer will want to hire them? Even if they're hired, would their co-workers treat them with due respect?

Give the kids a chance, guys. People make mistakes in life, but people can learn from their mistakes and move on.

I have a suspicion that some of those who're clamouring for the release of the 49 names are really salivating to see how many are Afros and how many are Indos. Truly a sad commentary on our Guyanese society.

Gilly, I think that kids doing adult crimes should do adult time, unless the crime that they do is to steal bread because they are hungry. Doing crime to sustain a life is a pardonable offense in my books.

Originally Posted by Jay Bharrat:

Other valid questions:

 

1. How many males, how many females?

2. What ages?

3. Urban or rural?

4. What's racial breakdown?

5. What are the crimes?

6. What are conditions of release? Would they be released again if they commit the same crimes again?

7. How did they come up with this list so quickly?  Did they go in with a list? 

8. Why was this a priority action? Is this part of the 100-day agenda?

9. What was process used to generate the list?  Who were consulted and were involved?

10. Did they inform the magistrates, police, persecutors, victims, witnesses against the criminals?

11. Will this boost the morale of law enforcement who would feel that all their efforts at law enforcement and securing convictions have been thrown in the trash, and they would not bother to charge people with similar crimes?

12. Does Granger understand that there is a close link between drug use and village crimes?  Drug users rob and kill people for money, and steal to buy drugs.

13. Is Granger trying out at being a dictator?

 

Where is Capitol News, KN, SN, Guyana Times, Chronicle, GT Mosquito, iNews and others when you need them to do investigative journalism?

Jay, crime does not wear a colour nor does it carry a gender, age. rural or urban?

 

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