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PAKEEZAH:

Pakeezah (Hindi: Γ Β€Βͺà€¾à€‒à€¼àΒ₯€à€œà€¼à€¾, Urdu: Γ™ΒΎΓ˜Β§Γ™β€šΓ›Ε’Γ˜Β²Γ˜Β§ lit.Virgin, pure of heart) was an Urdu film (of Bollywood, Indian cinema) that was released in 1972, and is well remembered by generations of its admirers for its touching story of a courtesan, and for its lovely songs by Lata Mangeshkar. It was the magnum opus of the perfectionist director, Kamal Amrohi.

Pakeezah took nearly 14 years to shoot because of change in relationship between Meena Kumari and the director from warm to worse and then back to compromise one.

The heroine of the movie, Meena Kumari, gave probably the best performance of her career. When initially released in February 1972 the film opened to a lukewarm response and was supposed to be a flop. However after Meena Kumari's untimely death a month later, Pakeezah became a cult classic.

WILL TAKE AN INDEPTH LOOK INTO PAZEEZAH:
quote:
Originally posted by asj:
PAKEEZAH:

Pakeezah (Hindi: Γ Β€Βͺà€¾à€‒à€¼àΒ₯€à€œà€¼à€¾, Urdu: Γ™ΒΎΓ˜Β§Γ™β€šΓ›Ε’Γ˜Β²Γ˜Β§ lit.Virgin, pure of heart) was an Urdu film (of Bollywood, Indian cinema) that was released in 1972, and is well remembered by generations of its admirers for its touching story of a courtesan, and for its lovely songs by Lata Mangeshkar. It was the magnum opus of the perfectionist director, Kamal Amrohi.

Pakeezah took nearly 14 years to shoot because of change in relationship between Meena Kumari and the director from warm to worse and then back to compromise one.

The heroine of the movie, Meena Kumari, gave probably the best performance of her career. When initially released in February 1972 the film opened to a lukewarm response and was supposed to be a flop. However after Meena Kumari's untimely death a month later, Pakeezah became a cult classic.

WILL TAKE AN INDEPTH LOOK INTO PAZEEZAH:


Our Jammat urge a boycott of the Film since it portrayed our dirty laundry, lol..I was told by my mother. I was too young.

The best
Some of best scenes from Pakeezah: the dance number..when she told the anjuman that they were the ones who removed her veil (her virginity).

Then that dramatic scene when Salim told her that "today" her shame will be removed forever. ON their way to the masjid which she was unaware of, she was humilated, and as they approached the masj id and the maulana began the nikkah,(up to that moment she had no name, she was nameless).Maulana as her what is her name, she had no answer, Salim said, "pakeezah" (the pure/virgin).... she did not want him to take this burden and ran off screaming... back to the patoorah Haveli.

Pakeezah was filmed over a long period and there was quite a long gap in between, in the movie Meena Kumar has grown old and face swollen from her abuse of alchol. She was hitting the booze big time.

http://redplanetblog.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/pakeezah.jpg
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quote:
Originally posted by Jansher:
quote:
Originally posted by Mitwah:
Bhaijan this item was very influential to our young student dancers. Directed by GHulam Mohammed.

Inhi Logo ne


bai Meena Kumari tear ass in her days.. this mumber came back in Umrao Jaan, Razia Sultana, among many others. Berbice Melas had all them dancers doing this number....

good to have you back.


Thanks. Only yesterday, on our way back from NY we were listening and talking about this song. People were naming their daughters (Meena) after her too.
quote:
Originally posted by Mitwah:
quote:
Originally posted by Jansher:
quote:
Originally posted by Mitwah:
Bhaijan this item was very influential to our young student dancers. Directed by GHulam Mohammed.

Inhi Logo ne


bai Meena Kumari tear ass in her days.. this mumber came back in Umrao Jaan, Razia Sultana, among many others. Berbice Melas had all them dancers doing this number....

good to have you back.


Thanks. Only yesterday, on our way back from NY we were listening and talking about this song. People were naming their daughters (Meena) after her too.


Big time they were naming them ghal Meena.

Well you missed the death of bollywood,

Please keep bollywood alive.
quote:
Originally posted by Jansher:



Big time they were naming them ghal Meena.

Well you missed the death of bollywood,

Please keep bollywood alive.


Certainly, I will do my best to keep it alive. It's distinct and I use to refer many of my friends to this forum especialy for songs and other topical items. I will not visit BET.

Another classical that I loved is Chalte Chalte (Walking, Walking).

Chalte Chalte
quote:
Originally posted by lynn:
quote:
Originally posted by Mitwah:
Another classical that I loved is Chalte Chalte (Walking, Walking).

Chalte Chalte

i love allthe songs from pakeeza

chalo dildar chalo
mausam hai aashiqana
tharo rahiyo


These songs are all beautiful. They also demonstrate the influence and the fusion of urdu and hindi. Ghulam Mohammed has carried out an extra ordinary task in directing the music. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by Mitwah:
quote:
Originally posted by Jansher:



Big time they were naming them ghal Meena.

Well you missed the death of bollywood,

Please keep bollywood alive.


Certainly, I will do my best to keep it alive. It's distinct and I use to refer many of my friends to this forum especialy for songs and other topical items. I will not visit BET.

Another classical that I loved is Chalte Chalte (Walking, Walking).

Chalte Chalte


waiting and waiting for my love to return... the night is ending, the oil lamp is extinguishing, he is not in sight... the train passes and meena sees no salim...
quote:
Originally posted by Jansher:

Me hear u get three diffent copies and you watch them about ten times halready..

Nargis retires to the qabarstaan and sahib jaan is born there... the azaan is heard in the background...


Meh does alternate the 3 and done watch them more than 10 times Big Grin

Something about the train whistle does get to me. I can actually feel her longing...
Hi Guys, thanks for keeping Bollywood alive, we hope that Admin sees the necessity on giving us back our "house"

Back to Pakeezah:

We know that Kamal Amrohi directs the film and it was his magnus opus, we are pleased to submit this piece from Amrohi's son.

"My father, Kamaal Amrohi, first started 'Pakeezah' in 1959. Since the film was in cinemascope and there was no equipment available in India, he leased an Anomorphic lens which could be attached to a 35 mm camera. On completion, the film had to be sent to a lab in London. My father was not satisfied with the results, insisting that it was out of focus. Twice the film was sent back to London and the lab assured him it was perfect, but he was not convinced. Finally a committee was formed in the USA to decide. The verdict...1/100th of a second out of focus! So impressed was 20th Century that they gifted my father the lens" (Tajdar Amrohi in B D Garg's 'So Many Cinemas')

More than a decade in the making, the film was eventually completed and released in 1970, the year in which Meena Kumari died, thus ensuring its runaway success. Amrohi brought the same fastidiousness to all his films. His next film 'Razia Sultan', made with a mammoth budget, took another decade to complete and when it was released in 1982, turned out to be a total disaster. Perhaps it is this which explains his extremely meagre output, a total of four films in more than fifty years' association with Hindi films.
Tajdar Amroh:

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quote:
Originally posted by Riya:
I have said this many time, Pakeezah is my all time favorite movie. All the songs are classic


In 70's, We were not a visible minority (Indos and Pakistanis from wherever) in Montreal. We were just a few but we mixed well. One of the profs from Pakistan used the Mc Gill auditorium and showed this movie. I always remember this movie since it was done in tribute to Meena.
continues........

One of the most romantic lines in Hindi cinema were uttered in Amrohi's next venture 'Pakeezah'. At a desolate railway station sometime late in the night Raaj Kumar enters a train compartment to find a sleeping Meena Kumari with her face covered. Virtually, the very next shot is a close up of her feet as she wakes in the morning. There is a note stuck to it with the following message. "Aap ke paanv dekhe. Bahut khoobsurat hain. Khudaaraa inhein zameen par naa utaariyega varna yeh maile ho jaayenge."

The story of a courtesan's love affar with an aristocratic young man and the social obstacles which come their way, 'Pakeezah' was marred by the long time it took to be made, and the stereotypical plot. Meena Kumari aged desperately in the Sixties as her personal life turned from tragedy to a self-sufficient and self-indulgent pathos and the film contained glaring inconsistencies of look. Ashok Kumar succumbs to family pressures and fails to keep his pledge to marry a courtesan. Their daughter is brought up as a courtesan, and when she grows up Raaj Kumar, who is Ashok's nephew, falls in love with her. Melodrama, stock situations and tacky sets further pulled down the threadbare plot which was only uplifted by Ghulam Mohammad's soulful music.

That train and the whistles................ Big Grin

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'Pakeezah' became a milestone that it did because of Meena Kumari's presence and the pathos she effortlessly brought to her role. It was released at the beginning of the Seventies, a period when things rapidly began to change both within the film industry and the country at large. In a sense it marks a culmination of an earlier period of filmmaking where Urdu language and Muslim socials marked the apogee of refinement and grace and the audience lapped it up. For two decades between 1970 and 1990, the vast teeming masses were the strongest determinant of Hindi cinema and that whole period is personified by Amitabh Bachchan. With that the Muslim social also took its curtain call notwithstanding the freak success of an odd 'Nikaah' or 'Tawaaif' in the 80s. This was amply evident when 'Razia Sultan' was released.

The times had changed as they always do. One can lament that process but regret for things past is also a comment on what takes its place, and therefore on the taste of one's contemporaries. A dubious exercise, but nevertheless not an entirely useless one. 'Pakeezah' represents the passing of an era. And we must remember it for that as well. For those who do not remember their past are condemned to relive it.

More from Pakeezah:

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