Iconic Indian Arrival Monument completed

Iconic Indian Arrival Monument completed

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AFTER some hiccups in construction, the iconic Indian Arrival Monument has been completed and is expected to be officially handed over to Guyana by the Government of India.

The monument at the T junction, Palmyra Village, Corentyne, Region Six, was built through funding from the Government of India. It is a tribute to the Indian indentured servants who arrived on these shores, then British Guiana, in 1838.
The mounted bronze memorial consists of artistic sculpted metal, depicting the lives of Indians in their routine everyday life.

Each of the figures carry something of importance – their jahaji bhandal (ship bundle) loaded with food, spices, herbs, clothing, jewellery, their gods, religious texts, drum, karaahi (cooking pan) taawa (flat circular metal for cooking roti), grass knives (scythe), cutlass and rice plants.

The figures are presented in a straightforward realism with the human factor ever present.
Guyanese sculptors, Philbert Gajadhar and Winslow Craig, designed the statues, which were then sent to India where a world-renowned artist was employed to cast the figures.
Public Infrastructure Minister David Patterson, in a facebook comment, hailed the completion of the Arrival Monument a success and praised the ‘skilled workers for an amazing job’.

Public Telecommunication Minister Cathy Hughes was also in awe.
“Well done, David. You get things done. For the naysayers, talk is cheap and criticising is easy,” she said.
Many were high in praise for the work done on the monument and others suggested a maintenance team be assembled to keep it in top shape.

On May 5, 2015, during an Indian Arrival yearly pilgrimage at Plantation Highbury, East Bank Berbice, Indian High Commissioner Venkatachalam Mahalingam, announced the proposed erection of the monument which was greeted by loud applause from those present.

He described the sculpted artistry as a fitting tribute to the ancestors who came to the then British Guiana.

Original Post

Modi did not want to endorse the PNC after he read about Indo discrimination on GNI. 

Word is that Granger will do the honours and boast about how talks with Jagdeo and GECOM were “fruitful” and there is no crisis in Guyana.

He will also boast about PNC’s biggest achievement in closing down the Indo  dominated sugar industry and how Moses is greater than Jagan. 

yuji22 posted:

Modi did not want to endorse the PNC after he read about Indo discrimination on GNI. 

Word is that Granger will do the honours and boast about how talks with Jagdeo and GECOM were “fruitful” and there is no crisis in Guyana.

He will also boast about PNC’s biggest achievement in closing down the Indo  dominated sugar industry and how Moses is greater than Jagan. 

Are you Granger's speechwriter? 

yuji22 posted:

Modi did not want to endorse the PNC after he read about Indo discrimination on GNI. 

Word is that Granger will do the honours and boast about how talks with Jagdeo and GECOM were “fruitful” and there is no crisis in Guyana.

He will also boast about PNC’s biggest achievement in closing down the Indo  dominated sugar industry and how Moses is greater than Jagan. 

Modi probably realized that Keffer was planning to show up to heckle him so he backed out

Gilbakka posted:

Narendra Modi was supposed to unveil that monument but something happened to cancel the visit. May 5 coming up. Let's wait and see who will have the honour.

Being a Guyanese historian, "do you think those headwear was around in 1838?"

The Nehru cap in particular.

Old photographs shows all the men wearing turbans (phagri).

Prashad posted:
yuji22 posted:

Modi did not want to endorse the PNC after he read about Indo discrimination on GNI. 

Word is that Granger will do the honours and boast about how talks with Jagdeo and GECOM were “fruitful” and there is no crisis in Guyana.

He will also boast about PNC’s biggest achievement in closing down the Indo  dominated sugar industry and how Moses is greater than Jagan. 

Modi probably realized that Keffer was planning to show up to heckle him so he backed out

You mekkin trouble!

Bibi Haniffa posted:

In 1838 many of the men wore Pagri and the women wore Romal and Horny.  Not sure of correct spelling.  It was considered disrespectful for a married woman to leave her home without wearing either of those two headwear.

I tried finding the proper spelling, but "horny" not giving me good options!!  Me can't post what popping up!

seignet posted:
Gilbakka posted:

Narendra Modi was supposed to unveil that monument but something happened to cancel the visit. May 5 coming up. Let's wait and see who will have the honour.

Being a Guyanese historian, "do you think those headwear was around in 1838?"

The Nehru cap in particular.

Old photographs shows all the men wearing turbans (phagri).

Phagri/turban was the fashion. Nehru caps came in the early 20th century with the independence movement. The last batches of indentured immigrants might have worn them.

But let's overlook that. The monument, the monument --- our ancestors' "murti" is the whole idea. Remember and revere.

Bibi Haniffa posted:

In 1838 many of the men wore Pagri and the women wore Romal and Horny.  Not sure of correct spelling.  It was considered disrespectful for a married woman to leave her home without wearing either of those two headwear.

Hi Bibi - It's - 'Rumal' and  'Orhni'.

Correct Randolph. 

I actually saw a few older Guyanese women wearing the Rumal in NY when I visited Richmond Hill last summer. Orhni are generally worn when attending Mandirs or religious function.

Our women fore parents would have generally worn saris and their heads covered. Men would generally worn Dhoti and Kurta. This would apply to mainly Hindus. Chief can chime in on what our Muslim brothers and sisters wore when they arrived. 

Leonora posted:
yuji22 posted:

Modi did not want to endorse the PNC after he read about Indo discrimination on GNI. 

Word is that Granger will do the honours and boast about how talks with Jagdeo and GECOM were “fruitful” and there is no crisis in Guyana.

He will also boast about PNC’s biggest achievement in closing down the Indo  dominated sugar industry and how Moses is greater than Jagan. 

Are you Granger's speechwriter? 

Ah notice you always run fuh defend Granger and PNC.  

randolph posted:
Bibi Haniffa posted:

In 1838 many of the men wore Pagri and the women wore Romal and Horny.  Not sure of correct spelling.  It was considered disrespectful for a married woman to leave her home without wearing either of those two headwear.

Hi Bibi - It's - 'Rumal' and  'Orhni'.

Not sure why Bibi would come up with horny!?

yuji22 posted:

Correct Randolph. 

I actually saw a few older Guyanese women wearing the Rumal in NY when I visited Richmond Hill last summer. Orhni are generally worn when attending Mandirs or religious function.

Our women fore parents would have generally worn saris and their heads covered. Men would generally worn Dhoti and Kurta. This would apply to mainly Hindus. Chief can chime in on what our Muslim brothers and sisters wore when they arrived. 

And our Fore Parents brought with them the great epics of the Ramayan, Bhagvad Geeta, the Vedas and the Koran.

cain posted:
Mitwah posted:

And our Fore Parents brought with them the great epics of the Ramayan, Bhagvad Geeta, the Vedas and the Koran.

..and our foreparents brought with them, gyalik poke.

In Bali, the majority is from the Islamic religion, followed by Hindus. Pork seems to be everywhere. In Denpasar, they were serving suckling meat. They called it Babi Guling. There seems to be no restrictions. Sow what?

randolph posted:
Bibi Haniffa posted:

In 1838 many of the men wore Pagri and the women wore Romal and Horny.  Not sure of correct spelling.  It was considered disrespectful for a married woman to leave her home without wearing either of those two headwear.

Hi Bibi - It's - 'Rumal' and  'Orhni'.

That's right. The Rumal was made out of a medium heavy type of plaid material. My mother always wore one when she left the house.

seignet posted:
Gilbakka posted:

Narendra Modi was supposed to unveil that monument but something happened to cancel the visit. May 5 coming up. Let's wait and see who will have the honour.

Being a Guyanese historian, "do you think those headwear was around in 1838?"

The Nehru cap in particular.

Old photographs shows all the men wearing turbans (phagri).

Historical misrepresentation in Indian Arrival Monument

https://www.stabroeknews.com/2...an-arrival-monument/

March 11 2019

Dear Editor,

I believe that the picture shown in the Indian Arrival Monument at Palmyra in Berbice does not give a true reflection of the actual event in several aspects including the head-wear of the male immigrant.

The male immigrant is shown wearing a head-dress reminiscent of what India’s first Prime Minister, the late Jawaharlal Nehru, initiated and popularized as the “Nehru cap”; I do not think that cap existed  when the Indian immigrants came to British Guiana from India.

As far as I know the male immigrants wore a piece of cloth which they tied around their heads.

Yours faithfully,

Nowrang Persaud  


 

Siege you are the man, Nowrang also mentioned about  the "Nehru Cap"

Django posted:
seignet posted:
Gilbakka posted:

Narendra Modi was supposed to unveil that monument but something happened to cancel the visit. May 5 coming up. Let's wait and see who will have the honour.

Being a Guyanese historian, "do you think those headwear was around in 1838?"

The Nehru cap in particular.

Old photographs shows all the men wearing turbans (phagri).

Historical misrepresentation in Indian Arrival Monument

https://www.stabroeknews.com/2...an-arrival-monument/

March 11 2019

Dear Editor,

I believe that the picture shown in the Indian Arrival Monument at Palmyra in Berbice does not give a true reflection of the actual event in several aspects including the head-wear of the male immigrant.

The male immigrant is shown wearing a head-dress reminiscent of what India’s first Prime Minister, the late Jawaharlal Nehru, initiated and popularized as the “Nehru cap”; I do not think that cap existed  when the Indian immigrants came to British Guiana from India.

As far as I know the male immigrants wore a piece of cloth which they tied around their heads.

Yours faithfully,

Nowrang Persaud  


 

Siege you are the man, Nowrang also mentioned about  the "Nehru Cap"

I use to see a lot of Indians(original) who wore "langhoti" too, especially when they went to the trenches to take a bath.

randolph posted:
Bibi Haniffa posted:

In 1838 many of the men wore Pagri and the women wore Romal and Horny.  Not sure of correct spelling.  It was considered disrespectful for a married woman to leave her home without wearing either of those two headwear.

Hi Bibi - It's - 'Rumal' and  'Orhni'.

Thanks for the correction.  I love that elegant look of these women.  I remember my great grandmother and her sisters, one of which is Dr. Balwant Singh’s mom wearing a white Orhni and white skirt and top all the time. 

Bibi Haniffa posted:
Baseman posted:
Mitwah posted:
Bibi Haniffa posted:

At least the monument doesn’t look like a Dicktater.

What does a Dicktater look like?

We go from horny to dick, all on the same thread.  People sound obsessed!

Fool the Hindi word for that garment is Odhani.  

So why did you write Horny? 

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