Guyanese homemade eggnog

antabanta posted:

Thanks. Looks like it's Coag. I just found this https://www.stabroeknews.com/2...-scene/09/15/203860/

 

Anta, COMPLAN was another drink served in maternity wards at New Amsterdam/GT hospitals in the 1960s.

I have known de spelling  as COAG. It became eggnog overseas.

Vish, now me know wha de white stuff was in Coag, da got kids high.

Its no wonder Cain is so skinny.  Whereas, we had our own cow fa milk and chicken fa fresh eggs. But it was rass pulling de cow udder with a straight aim into de bucket, an not to de face.

Cain, you eva drink warm milk straight from de cow and not hitting you eye ?

Another question. A while ago I realized the word "lease" in lease water is spelled differently but I forgot what it is. Does anyone know the correct spelling (and maybe pronunciation) for the nasty black water in canals next to cane fields?

antabanta posted:

Another question. A while ago I realized the word "lease" in lease water is spelled differently but I forgot what it is. Does anyone know the correct spelling (and maybe pronunciation) for the nasty black water in canals next to cane fields?

In 1945,  the Sugar Workers Welfare Fund retained an Italian doctor who was also instrumental in dealing with malaria in Guyana, to do a report regarding the living conditions of Indian Indenture  Labourers on the sugar estates. This report resulted in the logies being dismantled and new housing schemes being built at all the sugar estates, with better sanitation facilities.

I was sent a copy of this report by a student at the University of Guelph.  It has photographs of many sugar estates in 1945, including an aerial photo of Albion estate, where I lived. 

I made a poster size picture of this photograph and caption the different places, including the LEASE water trench.

Like you Anta, I was not sure whether it was called LEASE water trench, so I contacted an Albion historian friend  older than me. She explained that since the waste water for the factory was less than good water, it was called LEAST water, 'less than good  water'.

At Albion, we would often play on the LEAST water trench near the factory  that was spongy, but if we stand long enough at spot we would  sink. Later years, the least water was placed in regular drainage trenches, that became black and the fishes would surface and die.

I don't understand your entire question. ' Spelled differently, but I forgot what it is'.  

antabanta posted:

Another question. A while ago I realized the word "lease" in lease water is spelled differently but I forgot what it is. Does anyone know the correct spelling (and maybe pronunciation) for the nasty black water in canals next to cane fields?

My Dad said it's called Lease Water. I'm guessing that it's water that has no RELEASE, stagnant water. The canals don't lead to the ocean, so the water is stagnant, dirty and stinky. Like the canals in Venice, I rode in the Gondolas but squeezed my nose.

Wha rass Cain know bout LEASE wata, he ah one GT bhai who only seems to know whea  me Danish fren Inga put she finga ah Strand.

Anta, who knows who might have the right name. Names were butchered so much in Guyana, that its hard to know which one  is right. 

But what  Leonora described makes sense, because the LEASE water trench I knew at Albion  was stagnant water. It was a storage  trench, with  no exit to other trenches. But later the lease water was release into other trenches, that blacken the water and killed the fishes. The fishes would surface and seems to suffocate. 

Release black water in drainage trenches to the ocean, was not only bad for fishes, but also not good  for  animals and crops.  

Regarding butchered names. I was in GY and trying to find a guy name Harold, no one knew him, until I describe de man without any head hair and everyone know Balhead rum shop. Same with cane field, after its flooded for  a while and drained.  We called it BANDIN and I later discovered it was ABANDON. Then  someone gave me an English word meaning the same thing.  

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