A UNIQUE political event is scheduled to take place in Guyana on Friday night at the Providence National Stadium—a venue best known regionally and internationally for cricket.
It is being promoted as a “night of appreciation” for the country’s Head of State and Government, President Bharrat Jagdeo.


[President Bharrat Jagdeo]

President Bharrat Jagdeo
And the uniqueness of the occasion resides in the fact that in the political history of Guyana, this will be the first time a celebratory event has been organised to bid farewell to a Head of Government prior to his departure from office.
Home of the CARICOM Secretariat and a founding member of the Community, Guyana’s constitutional governance system is quite different in some critical areas from those of its partners. For a start, it is a republic with an Executive President endowed with enormous powers. There is also the difference in its electoral system of proportional representation (PR), in comparison to the first-past-the-post, or “winner-takes—all” model.
So far as the President is concerned, he/she is restricted to only two consecutive five-year terms in office. And this, basically, explains why non-government organizations, private sector enterprises and the governing People’s Progressive Party (PPP) are involved--(at no cost to the state, I have been told)-with Friday’s “night of appreciation” . Tributes will be paid to the “outstanding achievements” of President Jagdeo who would actually have served a dozen years when he demits that office, possibly in November, when new parliamentary and presidential elections are scheduled.
The extra two years, beyond the constitutional two consecutive five-year terms, requires a bit of explanation. He was first sworn in as President, in August 1999, then just 35 years, following the resignation of President Janet Jagan, widow of the late President Dr Cheddi Jagan, who died in office in March 1997.
Cheddi Jagan, who returned to government at the October 1992 general elections, was the second Executive President to die in office, the first being Forbes Burnham, architect of the republican constitution.
For Jagdeo, a development economist and former Finance Minister, his first and second five-year terms were achieved by decisive electoral victories for the PPP. He was to lead a steady path to social and economic development with the international financial institutions and the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB), pointing to consistent growth rates over recent years, the latest being a unique five percent for the region in the first half of 2011.
His domestic political opponents are, understandably, anxious to see his back and have precious little, if any positive things, to say about him. But even Jagdeo’s most strident critics would find it difficult to ignore his crusading zeal and commitment to Guyana’s social and economic transformation that has been taking place—with a mix of political blunders and natural disasters—over his 12-year tenure as President. Current dispassionate assessments of Guyana’s social and economic progress by the international financial institutions may perhaps better be appreciated when contrasted with 24 years of controversial rule by the now main opposition People’s National Congress (PNC).
That the “appreciation night” for President Jagdeo will take place amid near completion of arrangements for the coming parliamentary and presidential elections will not be ignored by his opponents. It has to take place before the official elections campaign is announced. What would, however, be relevant for those involved in organising Friday’s “appreciation” event is how far Guyana has progressed in socio-economic and cultural advancement, with Jagdeo, first as Finance Minister, and then for 12 years as President. In relation to visionary economic projects, Jagdeo may have effectively stamped his leadership on Guyana’s high-profile initiatives to preserve the country’s forest resources within the framework of the current challenging international issue of climate change. He is regarded as the primary architect of the country’s Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS).
An official blurb on his presidency reminds that “from being one of the most indebted countries per capita in the world, Guyana has, under President Jagdeo’s prudent and visionary leadership, been restored to the path of debt sustainability and international creditworthiness…..”
However, perhaps his more outstanding legacy could be his sustained efforts to heal the bewildering ethnic/social divisions that have, for too long, plagued Guyana, and, consequently blunting somewhat the full impact of achievements across the coastland and hinterland regions over the 19 years of governments by the PPP


Excerpts from the Guyana Chronicle
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by Rahmah bin Jabr:

Albert

Wonder if semi-illiterate Dalits will turnout in their thousands to show their appreciation for this Buggaman?


They will be there. Hits and Jam!!!! Gtwn people cant turn down a free fete.

Now if it wa sjust a speech by Jagdeo they will NOT be there....too boring.

Notice how it will be a big fete funded by taxpayers and folks caming to dance and have fun will be considered PPP supporters. AfroGuyanese and their hedonism will be exploited as it usually is.

BTW they dont care if the Dalits come or not because they know the Daklits will vote PPP or not vote. They want to show large numbers of black youths.
WHEN President Bharrat Jagdeo pointed to the positive fiscal results of the local economy, during the first half of 2011, it revealed that what those who oppose and the negative critics were and are still saying are mere far-fetched figments of their imagination. So instantly, one can deduce that Guyana’s economy is being built by hard and astute work from the leaders. Also, the hope is that this kind of news will not be made light of. The populace must be informed. During the past six or seven years, Guyana has been on a significantly elevated growth curve, and this news is pleasant, but not surprising. But why this is so? This is so because over the last five years, the climb has been slow but sure and steady. So this 5.9 percent growth is symptomatic of faith in wise investments and long-term strategies. The local exports actually jumped by 30 percent. So this is something to really shout about. After all, in many parts of the world, economies are struggling, and inflation is difficult to combat. I do think some details are in order here:

The non-sugar sector is projected to grow at 3.4 percent, revised upward from the original projection of 4.6 percent and 2.8 percent at the time of the budget of 2011. Export earnings expanded by 34.6 percent to US$533.1 million. In fact, Export earnings from sugar increased by 32.4 percent to US$50.1 million, reflecting a 30.4 percent increase in quantity shipped to 99,738 tonnes.

Rice continued its trend of successful first crops, with the 2011 first crop being 207,514 tonnes, 23 percent higher than at the corresponding period in 2010, and the highest first crop in the industry’s history. So rice export earnings expanded by 35.1 percent to US$92.6 million, mainly attributed to a 26.4 percent increase in average export price to US$551.4 per tonne, coupled with a 6.8 percent increase in export volume to 167,945 tonnes. So the leap is most salutary and very welcomed. But a word of commendation must go to the ‘behind the scene’ people.

Guyana’s improved performance is due mainly to investments and innovations in drainage and irrigation, the development of new and more tolerant rice strains, higher yields and higher acreage of paddy planted. These facts must not be taken for granted. To reach this far and reap these kinds of results, one must remember the hard work of the leaders. This is where people can now be hopeful that Guyana’s future is beginning to look very secure. In other words, people do not have to panic and leave in droves. Right here in Guyana, a solid living can be made.
quote:
WHEN President Bharrat Jagdeo pointed to the positive fiscal results of the local economy, during the first half of 2011, it revealed that what those who oppose and the negative critics were and are still saying are mere far-fetched figments of their imagination. So instantly, one can deduce that Guyana’s economy is being built by hard and astute work from the leaders. Also, the hope is that this kind of news will not be made light of. The populace must be informed. During the past six or seven years, Guyana has been on a significantly elevated growth curve, and this news is pleasant, but not surprising. But why this is so? This is so because over the last five years, the climb has been slow but sure and steady. So this 5.9 percent growth is symptomatic of faith in wise investments and long-term strategies. The local exports actually jumped by 30 percent. So this is something to really shout about. After all, in many parts of the world, economies are struggling, and inflation is difficult to combat. I do think some details are in order here:

The non-sugar sector is projected to grow at 3.4 percent, revised upward from the original projection of 4.6 percent and 2.8 percent at the time of the budget of 2011. Export earnings expanded by 34.6 percent to US$533.1 million. In fact, Export earnings from sugar increased by 32.4 percent to US$50.1 million, reflecting a 30.4 percent increase in quantity shipped to 99,738 tonnes.

Rice continued its trend of successful first crops, with the 2011 first crop being 207,514 tonnes, 23 percent higher than at the corresponding period in 2010, and the highest first crop in the industry’s history. So rice export earnings expanded by 35.1 percent to US$92.6 million, mainly attributed to a 26.4 percent increase in average export price to US$551.4 per tonne, coupled with a 6.8 percent increase in export volume to 167,945 tonnes. So the leap is most salutary and very welcomed. But a word of commendation must go to the ‘behind the scene’ people.

Guyana’s improved performance is due mainly to investments and innovations in drainage and irrigation, the development of new and more tolerant rice strains, higher yields and higher acreage of paddy planted. These facts must not be taken for granted. To reach this far and reap these kinds of results, one must remember the hard work of the leaders. This is where people can now be hopeful that Guyana’s future is beginning to look very secure. In other words, people do not have to panic and leave in droves. Right here in Guyana, a solid living can be made.