GNI BOOK CLUB [2]

Gilbakka posted:
IGH posted:


Never read a book by Jan Carew. I notice Peepal & his Bio refers to Agricola/Rome as being in the County of Berbice. As far as i know Agricola/Rome is on the East Bank of Demerara.

Arriving between 1/30 -  2/14

Black Midas_

 

 

Carew spent part of his childhood in Agricola EBD. He attended the primary school. His mother taught there and his grandfather was the headteacher. 

 

Thanks, Bookie - I like this nick better, since you do a lot of reading.

Even his bio refers to the county of Berbice.  Now that's FAKE NEWS. LOL

Agricola was not far from where my family lived. My dad owned a property there; which he eventually sold to the tenants.

Finished reading THE DOGS OF WAR by Frederick Forsyth. This novel, first published in 1974, has antiheroes --- tried, tested, fearless and ruthless mercenaries.
Sir James Manson is a British mining tycoon. He got filthy rich by bribing African leaders for mining concessions. Tests on rock samples reveal that the Crystal Mountain in Zangaro, a tiny West African republic, contain $$$billions' worth of platinum, a rare precious metal. Three major players control the world platinum market --- USA, communist Russia and South Africa. Manson wants exclusive right to exploit Crystal Mountain but Zangora's president is a Russian puppet. So Manson hires a band of mercenaries to topple the government and install his own puppet. Will he accomplish his goals?

GTAngler posted:
Anjali posted:
GTAngler posted:
Anjali posted:

I still like harlequin and ever so often will read an Enid Blyton 😀.

I bought a few of the series I read as a child with the hope my son will have my love of reading. He'll be 5 this month.

Early birthday wishes to your son, hopefully in a few more years he will be reading those Blyton's. I have almost all of her books, bought a lot online from England and Australia. I love her books as I grew up reading them. I am going to start reading The Whistler by Grisham. I would add Michael Anthony to the West Indian authors, (Cricket in the Road) etc.

Thank you very much. The way I see it, if he isn't interested in any of the things I have collected, he can always sell and apply towards College Tuition. At least he'll be exposed to them.

You are welcome.  I finished reading "The Whistler" and loved it. It is in the Grisham style and very good...totally enjoyed if.

Gilbakka posted:

Finished reading THE DOGS OF WAR by Frederick Forsyth. This novel, first published in 1974, has antiheroes --- tried, tested, fearless and ruthless mercenaries.
Sir James Manson is a British mining tycoon. He got filthy rich by bribing African leaders for mining concessions. Tests on rock samples reveal that the Crystal Mountain in Zangaro, a tiny West African republic, contain $$$billions' worth of platinum, a rare precious metal. Three major players control the world platinum market --- USA, communist Russia and South Africa. Manson wants exclusive right to exploit Crystal Mountain but Zangora's president is a Russian puppet. So Manson hires a band of mercenaries to topple the government and install his own puppet. Will he accomplish his goals?

Love Dogs Of War. Read Day Of The Jackal in my teens and started reading him exclusively. Can't put his books down despite their bulk.

antabanta posted:

Love Dogs Of War. Read Day Of The Jackal in my teens and started reading him exclusively. Can't put his books down despite their bulk.

"Dogs of War" is the third Forsyth novel I've read, after "Day of the Jackal" and "The Afghan". I like Forsyth better than John le Carré. Both are good though.

Gilbakka posted:

Finished reading THE DOGS OF WAR by Frederick Forsyth. This novel, first published in 1974, has antiheroes --- tried, tested, fearless and ruthless mercenaries.
Sir James Manson is a British mining tycoon. He got filthy rich by bribing African leaders for mining concessions. Tests on rock samples reveal that the Crystal Mountain in Zangaro, a tiny West African republic, contain $$$billions' worth of platinum, a rare precious metal. Three major players control the world platinum market --- USA, communist Russia and South Africa. Manson wants exclusive right to exploit Crystal Mountain but Zangora's president is a Russian puppet. So Manson hires a band of mercenaries to topple the government and install his own puppet. Will he accomplish his goals?

Saw the movie with Christopher Walken. Good movie but in my opinion, "The Wild Geese" is better. 

IGH posted:


Never read a book by Jan Carew. I notice Peepal & his Bio refers to Agricola/Rome as being in the County of Berbice. As far as i know Agricola/Rome is on the East Bank of Demerara.

Arriving between 1/30 -  2/14

Black Midas_

Bookie, just arrived from London, England: 50609795_146353579581960_5186315366611025920_n

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IGH posted:
IGH posted:


Never read a book by Jan Carew. I notice Peepal & his Bio refers to Agricola/Rome as being in the County of Berbice. As far as i know Agricola/Rome is on the East Bank of Demerara.

Arriving between 1/30 -  2/14

Black Midas_

Bookie, just arrived from London, England: 50609795_146353579581960_5186315366611025920_n

Thanks for telling. Enjoy.

Killing Che, Chuck Pfarrer - a fact-based fictional account of the capture and execution of Che Guevara in the Ñancahuazú jungle of Bolivia. A decent novel and good account of life in the poor South American country with an underlying display of the USA's contempt for smaller and less-developed nations.

IGH posted:
IGH posted:


Never read a book by Jan Carew. I notice Peepal & his Bio refers to Agricola/Rome as being in the County of Berbice. As far as i know Agricola/Rome is on the East Bank of Demerara.

Arriving between 1/30 -  2/14

Black Midas_

Bookie, just arrived from London, England: 50609795_146353579581960_5186315366611025920_n

That's the same copy I have. For some reason when I re-read it, there were more details in this book than there were in the one I read as a child back in Guyana. Maybe that was an abridged version for younger readers? It's a very good book. If you like this one, try "The Wild Coast" also by Carew.

GTAngler posted:

That's the same copy I have. For some reason when I re-read it, there were more details in this book than there were in the one I read as a child back in Guyana. Maybe that was an abridged version for younger readers? It's a very good book. If you like this one, try "The Wild Coast" also by Carew.

Black Midas is expensive - $20 on Amazon for a paperback. My wife got me a copy for Christmas and looks like a first edition that came from a library. I'm researching polypropylene bags for some of my collectibles.

GTAngler posted:
IGH posted:

Bookie, just arrived from London, England: 50609795_146353579581960_5186315366611025920_n

That's the same copy I have. For some reason when I re-read it, there were more details in this book than there were in the one I read as a child back in Guyana. Maybe that was an abridged version for younger readers? It's a very good book. If you like this one, try "The Wild Coast" also by Carew.

Thanks GTAngler. Based on your recommendation I will order - The Wild Coast - Jan Carew.


 

Finished reading "BOOK: My Autobiography" by John Agard. This is an informative children's book published in 2014. It has attractive illustrations by Neil Packer who had also illustrated "One Hundred Years of Solitude" by Gabriel García Márquez.

I decided to read this children's book partly because John Agard was my coworker and friend in Guyana in the early 1970s. Since 1977 he has resided in Britain. He is a prolific poet and playwright. In 2012 he won the Queen's Gold Medal in Poetry.

In "BOOK: My Autobiography" the narrator is, naturally, a book. It follows the evolution of books from their earliest clay tablet form through papyrus scroll, handheld codex with wood binding, paper book down to eBook format. It discusses such themes as hardcover books with cardboard and leather covers, softcover books including pocket size ones, Gutenberg press, steam-powered press, rotary press, Braille books, libraries etc.
I think parents and grandparents would find John Agard's book a worthy gift item.

https://www.amazon.com/Book-My...tKsvL&ref=plSrch

Finished reading THE RED AND THE BLACK by Stendhal. It is set in France around 1830. Born in a peasant family, Julien Sorel can uncommonly write and recite the whole New Testament in Latin. His talent and good looks enable him to become a social climber in a feudal society in transition after Napoleon's exile and the restoration of the monarchy. Julien engages in an affair with a provincial mayor's wife and, afterwards, with an aristocrat's daughter who bears him a son. It all ends in tragedy before Julien's 24th birthday.
Today I am beginning a celebrated African American memoir, BLACK BOY by Richard Wright. In honour of Black History Month.

IGH posted:
GTAngler posted:

I must confess that I have really bad reading habits. if a book doesn't grab my interest in the first few pages, it gets relegated to the "finish later" list unless I have read at least one good in my opinion book, by the same author. This is why whenever I lend or recommend books by an author who has written more than one, I select one of the better ones.

I usually leave stop reading & try to re-read when I am bored.

Started this a few years ... got very confusing ... book mark is @pages 242/243.

My friend who read it in Spanish told me I should start reading back from the beginning.


49439039_565595237246794_7511520157114564608_n

It is a great book, part of the genre called magical realism we see from post colonial writers like Rushdie, Toni Morrison, Arundhati Roy, and Kafka. They are meant to be confusing because they are actually cues for self analysis and questioning of reality, common beliefs and in short every experience. 

D2 posted:
IGH posted:
GTAngler posted:

I must confess that I have really bad reading habits. if a book doesn't grab my interest in the first few pages, it gets relegated to the "finish later" list unless I have read at least one good in my opinion book, by the same author. This is why whenever I lend or recommend books by an author who has written more than one, I select one of the better ones.

I usually leave stop reading & try to re-read when I am bored.

Started this a few years ... got very confusing ... book mark is @pages 242/243.

My friend who read it in Spanish told me I should start reading back from the beginning.


49439039_565595237246794_7511520157114564608_n

It is a great book, part of the genre called magical realism we see from post colonial writers like Rushdie, Toni Morrison, Arundhati Roy, and Kafka. They are meant to be confusing because they are actually cues for self analysis and questioning of reality, common beliefs and in short every experience. 

Thanks D2. I have few more books to read, before I go back "one hundred years of solitude."

 

Finished reading Richard Wright's memoir BLACK BOY. Wright (1908-1960) was born in Mississippi during the Jim Crow days, a period of racial segregation, discrimination and extreme brutality against African Americans. He spent his youth in the South and then moved northward to Chicago searching for betterment. With only a few years of formal schooling, Wright read extensively and studied independently and became a writer with a social conscience. During the mid-1930s he joined the US Communist Party but quitted in disgust over the party's never ending infighting and internal witch hunting. In 1945 Wright wrote his memoir. The next year he migrated to France and lived there for the rest of his life.
For me BLACK BOY is a riveting read with its firsthand portrayal of grinding poverty and oppression in the American South during the first quarter of the 20th century.

Gilbaka, I took your advice ... I am reading - Walk wit ... all ova Guyana _ Helena Martin. I am at p 262.

Coincidentally she lived on Stephen's Street in GT ... Hubby was born & lived there also. His family then moved to James Street as Helena. They never crossed path.

The places she named in the book so far, he remembers...

She refers to The Cathedral of Immaculate Conception as St. Mary's Cathedral. It was called St. Mary's Chapel ... I googled because hubby & I were not familiar with the name St. Mary's ... Hubby was  baptized in the present Cathedral.

I detested she kept referring to East Indians as Coolie. She never explained to the readers ...
She made her point at the beginning of the book by explaining certain slang or phrases.

Never heard  that only the EI  were beggars in Guyana.

Will give more of my opinion when I finish reading the book.


 



 

IGH posted:

Gilbaka, I took your advice ... I am reading - Walk wit ... all ova Guyana _ Helena Martin. I am at p 262.

Coincidentally she lived on Stephen's Street in GT ... Hubby was born & lived there also. His family then moved to James Street as Helena. They never crossed path.

The places she named in the book so far, he remembers...

She refers to The Cathedral of Immaculate Conception as St. Mary's Cathedral. It was called St. Mary's Chapel ... I googled because hubby & I were not familiar with the name St. Mary's ... Hubby was  baptized in the present Cathedral.

I detested she kept referring to East Indians as Coolie. She never explained to the readers ...
She made her point at the beginning of the book by explaining certain slang or phrases.

Never heard  that only the EI  were beggars in Guyana.

Will give more of my opinion when I finish reading the book.


 



 

Thanks for sharing your impression. It's her memoir and, naturally, it's highly subjective. Not wholly objective. I understand that and have overlooked some inaccuracies. There is a scarcity of memoirs by Portuguese-Guyanese. Helena Martin's book has shown me how some Portuguese of a certain class lived in Guyana. For which I am thankful.

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