Britain, France, Germany join Canada in saying Saudi version of Khashoggi’s death not ‘credible’

Saudi Arabia needs to provide facts to back up its explanation of what happened to journalist Jamal Khashoggi for it to be considered credible, Britain, France and Germany said in a joint statement on Sunday.

That echoes a theme espoused by Canada one day earlier but is far stronger than anything the U.S. government under Donald Trump has been willing to say so far.

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said in a statement Saturday night that the Saudis’ “explanations” of the killing of Jamal Khashoggi “lack consistency and credibility.”

She also reiterated the federal government’s call for a thorough investigation in collaboration with Turkish officials.

After denying any involvement in the disappearance of Khashoggi, for two weeks, Saudi Arabia on Saturday said the journalist died in a fistfight at the consulate. An hour later, another Saudi official attributed the death to a chokehold.

Britain, France and Germany said Sunday in their joint statement: “Nothing can justify this killing and we condemn it in the strongest possible terms.”

“There remains an urgent need for clarification of exactly what happened ... beyond the hypotheses that have been raised so far in the Saudi investigation, which need to be backed by facts to be considered credible.”

The countries stressed that more effort was needed and expected to establish the truth and ensure proper accountability for any crimes committed.

In her statement on Saturday, Freeland expressed sincere condolences to Khashoggi’s family and loved ones.

“The pain they are enduring as a result of this tragedy is heartbreaking,” she said, adding “Those responsible for the killing must be held to account and must face justice.”

Trump has not been willing to go that far yet but he’s beginning to face growing pressure from within his Republican party.

Trump’s comments about the Khashoggi incident in recent days have ranged from threatening Saudi Arabia with “very severe” consequences and warning of economic sanctions, to more conciliatory remarks in which he has played up the country’s role as a U.S. ally against Iran and Islamist militants, as well as a major purchaser of U.S. arms.

“I am not satisfied until we find the answer. But it was a big first step, it was a good first step. But I want to get to the answer,” Trump told reporters this weekend, when asked about the Saudi investigation and the subsequent firing of Saudi officials over the incident.

In an interview with the Washington Post, Trump said that “obviously there’s been deception, and there’s been lies.”

GOP Sen. Bob Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, went farther on Saturday, saying that Saudi Arabia’s crown prince “crossed a line” in the killing of Khashoggi and must pay a price.

Corker said on CNN’s State of the Union that he believed Mohammed bin Salman, the Saudi royal known as MBS, was behind the killing of Khashoggi, who vanished after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. Pro-government media in Turkey have reported that a hit squad travelled from Saudi Arabia to kill the Saudi critic.

"There has to be a punishment and a price paid for that,” Corker said on CNN. He also urged Turkey to turn over purported recordings of Khashoggi’s killing inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. The existence of such evidence has been reported in Turkish media in a series of leaks, though Turkish officials have yet to confirm they have recordings.

Sen. Ben Sasse, also a Republican, told CNN: “The Saudis have got a lot of explaining to do. I think everything should be on the table.”

With files from The Associated Press

Original Post

Freeland: Saudis' 'explanations' of Khashoggi's death lack credibility

The Canadian Press, Published Saturday, October 20, 2018 11:21PM EDT
Last Updated Sunday, October 21, 2018 7:10AM EDT, CTV News, https://www.ctvnews.ca/politic...redibility-1.4143032

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland speaks at a news conference during a meeting of Women Foreign Ministers in Montreal, Saturday, September 22, 2018. (THE CANADIAN PRESS / Graham Hughes)

OTTAWA -- Canada has condemned the killing of a Washington Post journalist in Saudi Arabia's consulate in Turkey.

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said in a statement Saturday night that the Saudis' "explanations" of the killing of Jamal Khashoggi "lack consistency and credibility."

She also reiterated the federal government's call for a thorough investigation in collaboration with Turkish officials.

Khashoggi vanished on Oct. 2 after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to get paperwork he needed to marry his Turkish fiancee. Five days later Turkish officials alleged that he had been tortured, killed and dismembered at the diplomatic outpost.

The Saudi government initially denied any involvement in Khashoggi's disappearance, but finally admitted early Saturday that he had died at the consulate, claiming he was killed in a "fistfight."

The kingdom also said that five top Saudi intelligence officials had been fired and 18 others arrested as a result of its investigation into the matter.

Khashoggi, once a Saudi royal family insider, grew critical of the kingdom's rulers following their crackdown on opposition, their war on neighbouring Yemen and the severing of ties with the small Gulf state of Qatar.

In her statement, Freeland expressed sincere condolences to Khashoggi's family and loved ones.

"The pain they are enduring as a result of this tragedy is heartbreaking," she said, adding "Those responsible for the killing must be held to account and must face justice."

Government officials in several other countries, including the United States, Germany and Britain, have issued similar statements expressing skepticism of the Saudi account of Khashoggi's death, while also demanding a full and transparent investigation.

The human rights group Amnesty International said Saudi Arabia should "immediately produce" Khashoggi's body so that independent forensic experts can conduct an autopsy in line with international standards.

cain posted:

Heard something about a Saudi dr who boasts he can make a body disappear in a short time, he was seen in the clip, entering the building. Anyone heard of this?

I believe that was the “bone saw” doctor who claims he could carve up a human body in six minutes.  Dem bannas wutliss no ass. 

Baseman posted:
cain posted:

Heard something about a Saudi dr who boasts he can make a body disappear in a short time, he was seen in the clip, entering the building. Anyone heard of this?

I believe that was the “bone saw” doctor who claims he could carve up a human body in six minutes.  Dem bannas wutliss no ass. 

How long did it take these butchers to freeze the guy to saw him in pieces or did they do a half ass job?

Skelly, this shows how ruthless the Saudis are. We are taking about an “expert” who can saw up in six mins. These Saudis are ruthless murderers.

We better keep our eyes on Keffer, he is headed out here for more training courses. 

yuji22 posted:

Skelly, this shows how ruthless the Saudis are. We are taking about an “expert” who can saw up in six mins. These Saudis are ruthless murderers.

We better keep our eyes on Keffer, he is headed out here for more training courses. 

Wait until Keffer reads this.

Prince posted:

Zam-zam water comes from Saudi Arabia. That water purifies you and tech any jumble from people. Ask Chief.

So what happened with them guys who killed Khashoggi, their zam zam water lil contaminated?

Add Reply

Likes (0)

×
×
×
×
×