caribny posted:

And of course DG is too terrified to discuss why blacks despise the PPP.

Your absolute choice to wallow with your topics/comments of no value.

On GNI, any one can post to the forum.

Others can read, comment, discuss, etc., IF They So Choose.

Bottom Line -- No one is bound nor obligated to discuss/respond to you.

Demerara_Guy posted:
caribny posted:

And of course DG is too terrified to discuss why blacks despise the PPP.

Your absolute choice to wallow with your topics/comments of no value.

On GNI, any one can post to the forum.

Others can read, comment, discuss, etc., IF They So Choose.

Bottom Line -- No one is bound nor obligated to discuss/respond to you.

Again DG is too terrified to discuss why blacks despise the PPP.

Its OK though.  I understand your problems!

Underground Railroad

Black Canadians, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Canadians

There is a sizable community of Black Canadians in Nova Scotia[32] and Southern Ontario who trace their ancestry to African-American slaves who used the Underground Railroad to flee from the United States, seeking refuge and freedom in Canada. From the late 1820s, through the time that the United Kingdom itself forbade slavery in 1833, until the American Civil War began in 1861, the Underground Railroad brought tens of thousands of fugitive slaves to Canada. In 1819, Sir John Robinson, the Attorney-General of Upper Canada, ruled: "Since freedom of the person is the most important civil right protected by the law of England...the negroes are entitled to personal freedom through residence in Upper Canada and any attempt to infringe their rights will be resisted in the courts".[48] After Robinson's ruling in 1819, judges in Upper Canada refused American requests to extradite run-away slaves who reached Upper Canada under the grounds "every man is free who reaches British ground".[49] One song popular with African Americans called the Song of the Free had the lyrics: "I'm on my way to Canada, That cold and distant land, The dire effects of slavery, I can no longer stand, Farewell, old master, Don't come after me, I'm on my way to Canada, Where colored men are free!".[50]

In 1850, the United States Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Act, which gave bounty hunters the right to recapture run-away slaves anywhere in the United States and ordered all federal, state and municipal law enforcement to co-operate with the bounty hunters in seizing run-away slaves.[51] Since the Fugitive Slave Act stripped accused fugitive slaves of any legal rights such as the right to testify in court that they were not run-away slaves, cases of freemen and freewomen being kidnapped off the streets to be sold into slavery become common.[51] The U.S justice system in the 1850s was hostile to black people, and little inclined to champion their rights. In 1857, in the Dred Scott v. Sandford decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that black Americans were not and never could be U.S. citizens under any conditions, a ruling that appeared to suggest that laws prohibiting slavery in the northern states were unconstitutional. As a result of the Fugitive Slave Act and legal rulings to expand slavery in the United States, many free blacks living in the United States chose to seek sanctuary in Canada with one newspaper in 1850 mentioning that a group of blacks working for a Pittsburgh hotel had armed themselves with handguns before heading for Canada saying they were "... determined to die rather be captured".[51] The Toronto Colonist newspaper on 17 June 1852 noted that almost every ship or boat coming into Toronto harbor from the American side of Lake Ontario seemed to be carrying a run-away slave.[51] One of the more active "conductors" on the Underground Railroad was Harriet Tubman, the "Black Moses" who made 11 trips to bring about 300 run-away slaves to Canada, most of whom settled in St. Catherines.[52] Tubman guided her "passengers" on nocturnal journeys (travelling via day was too risky) through the forests and swamps, using as her compass the north-star and on cloudy nights seeing what side the moss was growing on trees, to find the best way to Canada.[53] Such trips on the Underground Railroad involved much privation and suffering as Tubman and her "passengers" had to avoid both the bounty-hunters and law enforcement and could go for days without food as they travelled through the wilderness, always following the north-star.[53] Tubman usually went to Rochester, New York, where Frederick Douglass would shelter the run-aways and crossed over to Canada at Niagara Falls.[54] Unlike the U.S. customs, which under the Fugitive Slave Act had to co-operate with the bounty hunters, the customs authorities on the Canadian side of the border were far more helpful and "looked the other way" when Tubman entered Canada with her "passengers".[55]

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1d/Samuel_Ward.jpg

Rev. Samuel Ringgold Ward, c.1855. Ward had been forced to flee to Canada West in 1851 to escape charges of violating the Fugitive Slave Act by helping a run-away slave escape to Canada.

During the course of one week in June 1854, 23 run-away slaves evaded the U.S border patrols to cross the Detroit river to freedom in Windsor while 43 free people also crossed over to Windsor out of the fear of the bounty hunters.[51] The American-born Canadian sociologist Daniel G. Hill wrote this week in June 1854 appeared to be typical of the black exodus to Canada.[51] Public opinion tended to be on the side of run-away slaves and against the slavers. On 26 February 1851, the Toronto chapter of the Anti-Slavery Society was founded with what was described by the Globe newspaper as "the largest and most enthusiastic meeting we have ever seen in Toronto" that issued the resolution: "slavery is an outrage on the laws of humanity and its continued practice demands the best exertions for its extinction".[56] The same meeting committed its members to help the many "houseless and homeless victims of slavery flying to our soil".[56] The Congregationalist minister, the Reverend Samuel Ringgold Ward of New York, who had been born into slavery in Maryland, wrote about Canada West (modern Ontario) that: "Toronto is somewhat peculiar in many ways, anti-slavery is more popular there than in any city I know save Syracuse...I had good audiences in the towns of Vaughan, Markham, Pickering and in the village of Newmarket. Anti-slavery feeling is spreading and increasing in all these places. The public mind literally thirsts for the truth, and honest listeners and anxious inquirers will travel many miles, crowd our country chapels, and remain for hours eagerly and patiently seeking the light".[56] Ward himself had been forced to flee to Canada West in 1851 for his role in the Jerry Rescue, leading to his indictment for violating the Fugitive Slave Act. Despite the support to run-away slaves, blacks in Canada West, which become Ontario in 1867, were confided to segregated schools.[21]

American bounty-hunters who crossed into Canada to kidnap black people to sell into slavery were prosecuted for kidnapping if apprehended by the authorities.[57] In 1857, an attempt by two American bounty hunters, T.G. James and John Wells, to kidnap Joseph Alexander, a 20-year old run-away slave from New Orleans living in Chatham, was foiled when a large crowd of black people surrounded the bounty hunters as they were leaving the Royal Exchange Hotel in Chatham with Alexander who had gone there to confront them.[58] Found on one of the bounty hunters was a letter from Alexander's former master describing him as a slave of "saucy" disposition who had smashed the master's carriage and freed a span of his horses before running away, adding that he was keen to get Alexander back so he could castrate him.[58] Castration was the normal punishment for a male run-away slave. Alexander gave a speech to the assembled by-standers watching the confrontation denouncing life in the "slave pens" of New Orleans as extremely dehumanizing and stated he would rather die than return to living as a slave.[58] Alexander described life in the "slave pens" as a regime of daily whippings, beatings and rapes designed to cow the slaves into a state of utter submission. The confrontation ended with Alexander being freed and the crowd marching Wells and James to the railroad station, warning them to never return to Chatham.[58]

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/William_Hall_VC.jpg

William Hall of Horton, Nova Scotia was the first black man to win the Victoria Cross

The refugee slaves who settled in Canada did so primarily in South Western Ontario, with significant concentrations being found in Amherstburg, Colchester, Chatham, Windsor, and Sandwich. Run-away slaves tended to concentrate, partly to provide mutual support, party because of prejudices, and partly out of the fear of American bounty hunters crossing the border.[21] The run-away slaves usually arrived destitute and without any assets, had to work as laborers for others until they could save up enough money to buy their own farms.[21] These settlements acted as centres of abolitionist thought, with Chatham being the location of abolitionist John Brown's constitutional convention which preceded the later raid on Harper's Ferry.[59] While the first newspaper published by a black woman was founded in North Buxton by the free Black Mary Ann Shadd which pressed for Black emigration to Canada as the best option for fleeing African Americans.[59] The settlement of Elgin was formed in 1849 with the royal assent of Governor-General of the time James Bruce as a settlement for Black Canadians and escaped slaves based upon social welfare and the prevention of moral decay among the Black community there. Led by the Elgin Association and preacher William King, the settlement flourished as a model of a successful predominantly African settlement which held close to 200 families by 1859.[60]

Following the abolition of slavery in the British empire in 1834, any black man born a British subject or who become a British subject was allowed to vote and run for office, provided that they owned taxable property.[61] The property requirement on voting in Canada was not ended until 1920.[61] Black Canadian women like all other Canadian women were not granted the right to vote until partially in 1917 ( when wives, daughters, sisters and mothers of servicemen were granted the right to vote) and fully in 1918 (when all women were granted the right to vote).[61] In 1850, Canadian black women together with all other women were granted the right to vote for school trustees, which was the limit of female voting rights in Canada West.[61] In 1848, in Colchester county in Canada West, white men prevented black men from voting in the municipal elections, but following complaints in the courts, a judge ruled that black voters could not be prevented from voting.[61] Ward, writing about the Colchester case in The Voice of the Fugitive newspaper, declared that the right to vote was the "most sacred" of all rights, and that even if white men took away everything from the black farmers in Colchester county, that would still be a lesser crime compared with losing the "right of a British vote".[61] In 1859, Abraham Shadd become the first black elected to any office in what became Canada when he was elected to the town council in Raleigh in Kent county in Canada West.[61] In 1851, James Douglas became the governor of Vancouver Island, but that was not an elective one. Unlike in the United States, in Canada after the abolition of slavery in 1834, black Canadians were never stripped of their right to vote and hold office.[61]

Though often ignored, from time to time, black Canadians did receive notice. In 1857, William Hall of Horton, Nova Scotia, serving as a sailor in the Royal Navy, became the first black man to win the Victoria Cross, the highest decoration for valor in the British empire, for his actions at the siege of Lucknow.[62] Following the end of the American Civil War and subsequent emancipation of enslaved African Americans, a significant population remained, concentrated both within settlements established in the decades preceding the Civil War, and existing urban environments like Toronto.[63][64][65]

The Anti-Slavery Society of Canada estimated in its first report in 1852 that the "coloured population of Upper Canada" was about 30,000, of whom almost all adults were "fugitive slaves" from the United States.[66] St. Catharines, Ontario had a population of 6,000 at that time; 800 of its residents were "of African descent".[67] Many slaves sought refuge in Toronto which was known as a tolerant city. Black Canadians integrated in many areas of society, but the influence of slavery in the south still impacted these citizens. James Mink, an African Canadian who married his daughter to a white man, had his daughter sold into slavery during their honeymoon in the Southern States. She was freed after a large sum of money was paid and this behaviour was characterized as "a villainy that we are pleased to say characterizes few white [Toronto] men".[68]

Reference --

Black Canadians, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Canadians

Black Canadians

Black Canadians, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Canadians

Statistics

  • About 30 per cent of Black Canadians have Jamaican heritage.[157]
    • An additional 32 per cent have heritage elsewhere in the Caribbean or Bermuda.[14]
  • 60 per cent of Black Canadians are under the age of 35.[14]
  • 57 per cent of Black Canadians live in the province of Ontario.[158]
  • 97 per cent of Black Canadians live in urban areas.[14]
  • Black women in Canada outnumber black men by 32,000.[10]

Below is a list of provinces and territories, with the number of Black Canadians in each and their percentage of the population.[159]

Black population by province or territory
Province / territory2001 Census% 20012011 Census% 20112016 Census% 2016
Ontario411,0903.6%539,2054.3%627,7154.7%
Quebec152,1952.1%243,6253.2%319,2304.0%
Alberta31,3951.1%74,4352.1%129,3903.3%
British Columbia25,4650.7%33,2600.8%43,5001.0%
Manitoba12,8201.2%19,6101.7%30,3352.4%
Nova Scotia19,2302.1%20,7902.3%21,9152.4%
Saskatchewan4,1650.4%7,2550.7%14,9251.4%
New Brunswick3,8500.5%4,8700.7%7,0001.0%
Newfoundland and Labrador8400.2%1,4550.3%2,3550.5%
Prince Edward Island3700.3%3900.3%8250.6%
Northwest Territories1750.5%5551.4%7601.8%
Nunavut650.3%1200.4%3300.9%
Yukon1200.4%1000.3%2700.8%
Canada662,2152.2%945,6652.9%1,198,5403.5%

List of census subdivisions with Black populations higher than the national average

Source: Canada 2016 Census[1]
National average: 3.5% (1,198,540)

Alberta

Manitoba

New Brunswick

Nova Scotia

Ontario

Quebec

Reference --

Black Canadians, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Canadians

caribny posted:
 

If you knew Guyanese history, which I know you do not, 

@caribny, It is good that you know Guyana's history more than I do because I have a question for you. A few days ago, we were looking at the bauxite and sugar levies. They began prior to those two industries being nationalized and the sugar levy was rescinded sometime when Jagdeo was president. We couldn't find anything on when the bauxite levy was rescinded if it was ever rescinded. What do you know about that?

caribny posted:
ksazma posted:
 

It must have taken a lot of desperation for you to go digging up 1953, a time when both Burnham and Jagan were part of the PPP. I pointed to the AFC of 2006 and 2011. Why have you avoided addressing that so many times the past year? I am not obsessed with racial issues as you are. I never needed to use race as a crutch or excuse.

The vast majority of Indians NEVER supported the AFC.  And in the year that some of them did it was for Nagamootoo NOT Trotman.

So I repeat when have the majority of Indians ever voted for a party not led by an Indian?

At least in 1953 the majority of blacks passed by a black led party, voting for one led by an Indian.

I say this to say that your attempt to paint blacks as racist in their voting and Indians as not also racist is ridiculous, disingenuous, and shows what a foolish person you are!

Brother, you made the statement that 95% of blacks hate the PPP so I pursued their voting pattern to show that they vote for race and therefore wouldn't like the PPP. I went on to demonstrate through the AFC that they flocked to the polls to vote for it when Trotman was the presidential candidate but did not do so when Ramjattan was the candidate. How did Indian voting habits get into the discussion when no one made a similar statement that 95% of the Indians hate the PNC? Yuh guh end p with eye turn with all yuh helter skeltering. 

caribny posted:
Drugb posted:
 

Show some respect for DG and Jaggy. You posted nothing meaningful to celebrate black history month.

Druggie, lover of black vegetables stuffed into your two orifices on what basis do you have to suggest that we dont know our history.

Now I know that you are illiterate and dont read but there are many books on the assorted histories of blacks.  You should start with a book written by Walter Rodney on "How Europe Undeveloped Africa".  There is another titled " Themes in African Guyanese History" written by several, David Granger being among them.

If you see my home I have scores of books on assorted aspects of the history of blacks.  Now I put them on Kindle.

And here is DG posting articles on black individuals and I bet not even reading them.  What DG ought to be doing and just confirmed that he is afraid to do is to discuss Afro Guyanese attitudes to the PPP and why these exist.

I find the entire black history month thing is condescending in itself. Which other group celebrate a month to highlight their achievements?  What is is with your folks that you need to be reminded of your own value?  Or is it the other way around, where the rest of the world needs to be reminded that Blacks also achieved?

ksazma posted:
 

Brother, you made the statement that 95% of blacks hate the PPP so I pursued their voting pattern to show that they vote for race and therefore wouldn't like the PPP. I went on to demonstrate through the AFC that they flocked to the polls to vote for it when Trotman was the presidential candidate but did not do so when Ramjattan was the candidate. How did Indian voting habits get into the discussion when no one made a similar statement that 95% of the Indians hate the PNC? Yuh guh end p with eye turn with all yuh helter skeltering. 

You were asked about Indian voting patterns.  And you refuse to answer because at NO point in Guyanese history have the majority of Indians ever voted for a party not led by an Indian.  At least I can point to 1953 when blacks supported a party led by an Indian instead of another party led by blacks.

I dont deny black race based voting patterns.  I want you to admit that Indians have the SAME voting patterns for the SAME reasons. 

You see Indians as being justified in avoiding the PNC, and you dont see this as race based.  When blacks similarly avoid the PPP you call them racist.  Two groups manifesting the same behavior yet only one called racist for doing so.

caribny posted:
Drugb posted:
 

. Which other group celebrate a month to highlight their achievements?  

Asian History month in May and Hispanic History month from mid Sept to mid October.

Both obscure events that no one knows about or celebrate. On the other hand, black history month is blasted over the media nonstop.

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
Drugb posted:
 

. Which other group celebrate a month to highlight their achievements?  

Asian History month in May and Hispanic History month from mid Sept to mid October.

Both obscure events that no one knows about or celebrate. On the other hand, black history month is blasted over the media nonstop.

The fact that YOU dont know anything about it doesnt mean that others dont, nor does it invalidate the fact that these heritage months are celebrated.

In a few days its Women's month.

Cribby, yuh running mad now. 😀. I didn’t say that Indians vote for the PPP because it is predominantly led by Indians. I said that they do because they think it is the better party as a government. I pointed out that blacks vote based on the race of the presidential candidate and pointed to how they supported the AFC for 2006 and 2011. You still haven’t disputed that is the reason for how blacks vote so why are you still arguing? 😀

Trevor Phillips

Source - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trevor_Phillips

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ab/Flickr_-_boellstiftung_-_Trevor_Phillips.jpg/200px-Flickr_-_boellstiftung_-_Trevor_Phillips.jpg

 
 
 
 
 
Trevor Phillips
 

Mark Trevor Phillips OBE ARCS FIC (born 31 December 1953) is a British writer, broadcaster and former politician. In March 2015, Phillips was appointed as the President of the Partnership Council of the John Lewis Partnership for a three-year term. His is the first external appointment since 1928.[1]

Phillips is Deputy Chairman of the Board of the National Equality Standard, and other business appointments include chairman of Green Park Diversity Analytics, director of WebberPhillips, a data analytics provider; and director of Pepper Productions, an independent television production company. He is a member of the board of the Barbican Arts Centre and the Council of Aldeburgh Music; and a trustee of the Social Mobility Foundation, among other charities.

Phillips is a former chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) and a former television presenter and executive.

Phillips became head of the Commission for Racial Equality in 2003, and on its abolition in 2006 was appointed full-time chairman of its successor, the EHRC (initially called the Commission for Equality and Human Rights), which had a broader remit of combating discrimination and promoting equality across other grounds (age, disability, gender, race, religion and belief, sexual orientation and gender reassignment).[2] The EHRC also had the role of promoting and defending human rights, and secured recognition as the national human rights institution for England and Wales (alongside separate commissions in Northern Ireland and Scotland). Phillips' tenure as EHRC chairman (which at his request became a part-time position in 2009) has at times been controversial.

Early life

Mark Trevor Phillips was born in Islington, London, the youngest of ten children.[3] His parents emigrated from then British Guiana in 1950. He spent his childhood partly in British Guiana, and partly in Wood Green, north London; he attended Wood Green County Grammar School (became Wood Green Comprehensive in 1967) on White Hart Lane, but took his A-levels at Queen's College in Georgetown, Guyana. He returned to London to study for a BSc in Chemistry at Imperial College London.

Political activity

As a student at Imperial he became president of its students' union. In 1978 he was elected president of the National Union of Students as a candidate for the Broad Left.

Phillips was active in the voluntary sector, serving as chairman of the Runnymede Trust, a think-tank promoting ethnic equality, from 1993 to 1998, and as a commissioner for a number of other charities. He also served as chairman of the London Arts Board. His long-standing friendship with Peter Mandelson (who worked with Phillips at LWT and was best man at his first wedding) brought him close to the New Labour project and he became friendly with Tony Blair. Phillips joined the Labour Party in London in 1996. He was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the 1999 New Year Honours list for services to broadcast journalism.[4] Later in 1999, Phillips ran to be Labour's candidate for Mayor of London.

Phillips was initially reported to be Tony Blair's preferred choice for the role, and when Blair called for the party to swiftly unite behind one candidate, Ken Livingstone, a left-winger and favourite to win the nomination, offered to form a joint ticket with Phillips as his running mate. Phillips described Livingstone's offer as "patronising" in a response that was seen as an accusation of racism, though Phillips later denied this.[5] Following this and other controversies, including his decision to send his children to a private school, Phillips withdrew from the race a few months later and was not on the final shortlist of candidates. Instead, he accepted an offer to be running mate to Frank Dobson.

Although Dobson won the nomination, his candidature was harmed by the perception that the contest was "fixed" by the use of an electoral college.[6] Livingstone ran as an independent and won. The Labour Party designated Phillips as a member of the London Assembly on 4 May 2000 as one of its 'top-up' candidates. Phillips served as chairman of the Assembly until February 2003, before resigning his seat to take up his appointment at the Commission for Racial Equality.

Multiculturalism: disagreements with Ken Livingstone

Phillips and Livingstone had a frosty relationship throughout Phillips' time on the London Assembly, and Phillips' opposition to multiculturalism saw them clash time and again during his tenure at the CRE. In a Times interview in April 2004, Phillips called for the government to reject its support for multiculturalism, claiming it was out of date, and legitimised "separateness" between communities and instead should "assert a core of Britishness".[7]

In 2006, Livingstone accused Phillips of "pandering to the right" so much that he "would soon join the BNP".[8] Phillips himself replied that his views had been "well documented" and "well supported". Phillips has made speeches stating that "it was right to ask hard questions about multicultural Britain". Although he apologised for his presentation of research by the Australian academic Michael Poulsen of statistics on levels of segregation, which had led to some controversy, he welcomed the focus on integration of different communities after the launch of A Commission for Integration and Cohesion.[9] Phillips has subsequently cited recent work by, amongst others, Professor Eric Kaufman of Birkbeck College, London showing that white and non-white segregation in London and Birmingham has increased during the census period to 2011.[10]

After the 2005 riots in France, Phillips warned that "inequality, race and powerlessness" can be "incendiary". He was invited to advise the French government and in September 2007 was awarded the Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur.[11]

Chairman of the EHRC

Phillips' tenure as EHRC chairman was dogged by controversies and internal dissent. Under his leadership it was reported that six of the body's commissioners departed after expressing concerns about his leadership and probity and others were reported to be considering their position.[12][13]

In 2010 Phillips was investigated regarding alleged attempts to influence a committee (the Joint Committee on Human Rights) writing a report on him. He would have been the first non-politician in over half a century to be convicted of this offence, but the Lords Committee found that the allegations were "subjective, and that no firm factual evidence is presented in their support; nor are they borne out by the submissions by individual members of the JCHR."[14] He was cleared of contempt of Parliament and the House of Lords recommended that new and clearer guidance about the conduct of witnesses to Select Committees be issued.[15] However, he was told his behaviour was "inappropriate and ill-advised".[16]

Phillips completed his second term of office in September 2012, which, together with his term at the CRE made him the longest serving leader of any UK equality commission.

In 2006 Phillips has warned that Britain's current approach to multiculturalism could cause Britain to "sleepwalk towards segregation".[17] He expanded on these views in 2016 a publication by Civitas entitled Race and Faith: the Deafening Silence, in which he said that "squeamishness about addressing diversity and its discontents risks allowing our country to sleepwalk to a catastrophe that will set community against community, endorse sexist aggression, suppress freedom of expression, reverse hard-won civil liberties, and undermine the liberal democracy that has served this country so well for so long."[18]

Views on Islam and free speech

Trevor Phillips has spoken on the need for free speech to "allow people to offend each other."[19] These comments came after the protests against the Danish cartoons satirising the Islamic prophet, Muhammad which sparked protests in the Muslim world. He stated in an ITV interview: "One point of Britishness is that people can say what they like about the way we should live, however absurd, however unpopular it is." While supporting free speech, Phillips has spoken out against providing the far right with a platform. Discussing the Oxford Union's invitation to BNP leader Nick Griffin and Holocaust denier David Irving, he told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show: "As a former president of the National Union of Students, I'm ashamed that this has happened. This is not a question of freedom of speech, this is a juvenile provocation. What I would say to students at Oxford is: You're supposed to be brilliant. Put your brains back in your head. People fought and died for freedom of expression and freedom of speech. They didn't fight and die for it so it could be used as a sort of silly parlour game. This is just a piece of silly pranksterism and the issues are too serious to be left to that." Griffin has since hit back at Phillips by declaring him a "black racist" in an interview given to Channel 4.[20]

Opposition to 42-day detention

In early June 2008 Phillips as EHRC head voiced that he "remain[ed] unpersuaded that the government has yet provided compelling evidence for what our legal advice shows would be an effective suspension of some human rights"[21] Phillips was responding to the growing uproar surrounding proposals to amend counter-terrorism legislation to permit 42 days' detention without charge. He raised the possibility of the EHRC legally testing the legislation by judicial review. In the event, the Brown government maintained the limit on detention without charge at 28 days (although in practice a 14-day limit was observed). Following the installation of a Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government the limit was in January 2011 allowed to revert to 14 days.

Comparisons between Britain and the United States

In an article published in 2003,[22] Phillips stated "from Rome, through Constantinople to Venice and London, our (European) nations have a history of peacefully absorbing huge, diverse movements of people, driven by war, famine and persecution; and there is no history of long-term ethnic segregation of the kind one can see in any US city".

In a March 2008 article for Prospect magazine, Phillips was cool on Barack Obama as a potential Presidential candidate, and speculated that if he did become President it might "postpone the arrival of a post-racial America".[23]

Following Obama's election, in an interview for the London Times on 8 November 2008,[24] Trevor Phillips said that he believed it would be impossible for a black candidate in the United Kingdom to rise to the top in politics because of institutional racism within the Labour Party. He said;

If Barack Obama had lived here I would be very surprised if even somebody as brilliant as him would have been able to break through the institutional stranglehold that there is on power within the Labour party.[25]

The comments gained support and criticism from members of ethnic communities in the UK.[26] An article on Phillips in The Independent pointed out the demographic differences between the United Kingdom and the United States, making a comparison untenable. In the United States, non-whites constitute about one third of the population, whereas in the United Kingdom people of non-European ancestry made up less than 10% of the population in 2008.[27]

Broadcasting and writing

Phillips worked initially as a researcher for London Weekend Television (LWT), before being promoted to head of current affairs in 1992, remaining in the post until 1994. He produced and presented The London Programme for LWT and has worked on projects for the BBC and Channel 4. With his brother, the crime writer Mike Phillips, he wrote Windrush: The Irresistible Rise of Multi-racial Britain (1998, HarperCollins, ISBN 0-00-255909-9). He has won three Royal Television Society Awards, including Documentary Series of the Year for Windrush in 1999. He is a Vice President of the RTS.

In March 2015, Channel 4 aired Things We Won't Say About Race (That Are True), a feature-length documentary written and presented by Phillips and co-produced by Pepper Productions and Outline Productions.[28][29] Philips was invited to analyse and interpret the survey for the documentary What British Muslims Really Think aired April 2016, which followed similar themes to Things We Won't Say About Race (That Are True) relating to exploring racial truths through statistics.[30]

Personal life

Phillips married Asha Bhownagary, a Parsi child psychotherapist, in 1981[31] and they have two daughters. They separated in 2008. He married TV producer Helen Veale in September 2013.

Letitia Wright

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, Source --  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letitia_Wright

Letitia Michelle Wright (born 31 October 1993)[1] is a Guyanese-born British actress. Beginning her professional career in 2011, she has played roles in several British TV series, including Top Boy, Coming Up, Chasing Shadows, Humans, the Doctor Who episode "Face the Raven" and the Black Mirror episode "Black Museum"; for the latter she received a Primetime Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie.

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts named Wright among the 2015 group of BAFTA Breakthrough Brits for her role in the award-winning film Urban Hymn.[2] In 2018, she achieved global recognition with her portrayal of Shuri in the Marvel Cinematic Universe films Black Panther and Avengers: Infinity War, both of which stand amongst the highest-grossing films of all time. In 2019 she received the BAFTA Rising Star Award.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/37/Letitia_Wright_by_Gage_Skidmore.jpg/220px-Letitia_Wright_by_Gage_Skidmore.jpg

Wright at the 2017 San Diego Comic-Con
Born
Letitia Michelle Wright

31 October 1993 (age 25)
NationalityBritish
OccupationActress
Years active2011–present

Early life

right was born in Georgetown, Guyana. Her family moved to London when she was seven years old, and she attended school there.[1] Having been brought up in Tottenham, and attending Duke's Aldridge Academy, she has stated, "I'll always be a north London girl."[3]

Career

Wright's interest in acting was inspired when she saw the 2006 drama film Akeelah and the Bee and found the lead, Akeelah Anderson (Keke Palmer), to be a positive role model. Determined to act, she sent emails to different agents about her acting experience until she was picked for small parts. She starred in My Brother the Devil, where she was recognized by Screen International as one of its 2012 Stars of Tomorrow. Michael Caton-Jones cast her in Urban Hymn (2015), which brought her to the attention of Hollywood.[1][4] She has played in numerous episodes of British TV series (see table below).

Wright co-starred in Black Panther, playing the role of Shuri, King T’Challa’s sister and princess of Wakanda.[5] The film was released worldwide in February 2018, and starred Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong'o, Danai Gurira, and Chadwick Boseman.[6][7] She reprised the role in the next Marvel Cinematic Universe film, Avengers: Infinity War, which was released in April 2018.[8] Also in 2018, Wright appeared as Reb in Steven Spielberg's film adaptation of the 2011 science-fiction novel Ready Player One.[9] Wright features as one of the cameos in Drake's music video for "Nice for What".[10]

Personal life

Wright has been vocal about her struggles with depression. In 2018 she told Vanity Fair, "I was in the dark going through so many bad things, when the world didn’t know about Shuri and Letitia and whatever is happening now."[11] Wright took a break from acting until 2015 after she encountered Christianity at a London actors' Bible study.[11] On the UK talk show This Morning, she explained, "I needed to take a break from acting, because I really idolized it. So I came off from it and I went on a journey to discover my relationship with God, and I became a Christian."[12]

Filmography

Film

YearTitleRoleNotes
2011VictimNyla 
2012My Brother the DevilAisha 
2015Urban HymnJamie Harrison 
2018The CommuterJules Skateboarder 
Black PantherShuri 
Ready Player OneReb 
Avengers: Infinity WarShuri 
2019Avengers: EndgamePost-production
TBAGuava Island Post-production

Television

YearTitleRoleNotes
2011Holby CityEllie MaynardEpisodes: "Tunnel Vision" and "Crossing the Line"
RandomGirl 3TV movie
Top BoyChantelle4 episodes
2013Coming UpHannahEpisode: "Big Girl"
2014Glasgow GirlsAmalTV movie
Chasing ShadowsTaylor DavisEpisode: "Only Connect"
2014–2017City 17 StreetVanessa PadeRecurring role
2015BananaVivienne Scott3 episodes
Cucumber4 episodes
Doctor WhoAnahsonEpisode: "Face the Raven"
2016HumansRenie7 episodes
2017Black MirrorNishEpisode: "Black Museum"

Awards and nominations

YearAwardCategoryWorkResultRef.
2018Primetime Emmy AwardsOutstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or MovieBlack MirrorNominated 
2018Saturn AwardsBest Performance by a Younger ActorBlack PantherNominated 
2018MTV Movie & TV AwardsBest On-Screen TeamNominated 
Scene StealerNominated 
2018Teen Choice AwardsChoice Sci-Fi Movie ActressWon 
Choice Breakout Movie StarNominated 
2019British Academy Film AwardsRising Star AwardWon 
2019Screen Actors Guild AwardsOutstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion PictureWon

 

Michelle did an excellent Job in the Black Panther. My daughter came home told me “Dad your fellow Guyanese did a superb job in the Black Panther”

I enjoyed watching the Black Panther. Makes me proud to be Guyanese.

ksazma posted:

Cribby, yuh running mad now. 😀. I didn’t say that Indians vote for the PPP because it is predominantly led by Indians. I said that they do because they think it is the better party as a government. I pointed out that blacks vote based on the race of the presidential candidate and pointed to how they supported the AFC for 2006 and 2011. You still haven’t disputed that is the reason for how blacks vote so why are you still arguing? 😀

And blacks also think that the APNU is better than the PPP.  In reality BOTH vote for the parties of their choice because BOTH fear dominance by the other side.

You merely show your racist nature when you scream that Indo perspectives are more valid than blacks.

Ralph Ramkarran says that BOTH Indians and Africans vote race for the SAME reasons.  Both fear marginalization if the other side wins, and based on their experiences BOTH have fears which are valid.

Ramkarran is an honest man when it comes to this issue.  He doesn't peddle the Indo perspective just because he is an Indian.  He listens to BOTH sides and see that BOTH validate their voting the SAME way.

Now when the AFC was led by Trotman did it get rural Indian votes?  NO!  It is when a man with rural Indian background led the AFC that is when a small % of Indos came over!

Trotman had virtually NO support from rural Indians!  So you CANNOT say that Indians don't vote based on race anymore than you contend that blacks do!

yuji22 posted:

Michelle did an excellent Job in the Black Panther. My daughter came home told me “Dad your fellow Guyanese did a superb job in the Black Panther”

I enjoyed watching the Black Panther. Makes me proud to be Guyanese.

And if a female relative wanted to marry her brother you would call this woman and her brother "dutty, stink and lazy black people", and banish anyone in your family who wished to marry them.

And you would say the same for Trevor Phillips even though he has more impact and prestige than any relative of your would ever have.

Demerara_Guy posted:

Trevor Phillips

Source - From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trevor_Phillips

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ab/Flickr_-_boellstiftung_-_Trevor_Phillips.jpg/200px-Flickr_-_boellstiftung_-_Trevor_Phillips.jpg

 
 
 
 
 
Trevor Phillips
 

Mark Trevor Phillips OBE ARCS FIC (born 31 December 1953) is a British writer, broadcaster and former politician. In March 2015, Phillips was appointed as the President of the Partnership Council of the John Lewis Partnership for a three-year term. His is the first external appointment since 1928.[1]

Phillips is Deputy Chairman of the Board of the National Equality Standard, and other business appointments include chairman of Green Park Diversity Analytics, director of WebberPhillips, a data analytics provider; and director of Pepper Productions, an independent television production company. He is a member of the board of the Barbican Arts Centre and the Council of Aldeburgh Music; and a trustee of the Social Mobility Foundation, among other charities.

Phillips is a former chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) and a former television presenter and executive.

Phillips became head of the Commission for Racial Equality in 2003, and on its abolition in 2006 was appointed full-time chairman of its successor, the EHRC (initially called the Commission for Equality and Human Rights), which had a broader remit of combating discrimination and promoting equality across other grounds (age, disability, gender, race, religion and belief, sexual orientation and gender reassignment).[2] The EHRC also had the role of promoting and defending human rights, and secured recognition as the national human rights institution for England and Wales (alongside separate commissions in Northern Ireland and Scotland). Phillips' tenure as EHRC chairman (which at his request became a part-time position in 2009) has at times been controversial.

Early life

Mark Trevor Phillips was born in Islington, London, the youngest of ten children.[3] His parents emigrated from then British Guiana in 1950. He spent his childhood partly in British Guiana, and partly in Wood Green, north London; he attended Wood Green County Grammar School (became Wood Green Comprehensive in 1967) on White Hart Lane, but took his A-levels at Queen's College in Georgetown, Guyana. He returned to London to study for a BSc in Chemistry at Imperial College London.

Political activity

As a student at Imperial he became president of its students' union. In 1978 he was elected president of the National Union of Students as a candidate for the Broad Left.

Phillips was active in the voluntary sector, serving as chairman of the Runnymede Trust, a think-tank promoting ethnic equality, from 1993 to 1998, and as a commissioner for a number of other charities. He also served as chairman of the London Arts Board. His long-standing friendship with Peter Mandelson (who worked with Phillips at LWT and was best man at his first wedding) brought him close to the New Labour project and he became friendly with Tony Blair. Phillips joined the Labour Party in London in 1996. He was made an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in the 1999 New Year Honours list for services to broadcast journalism.[4] Later in 1999, Phillips ran to be Labour's candidate for Mayor of London.

Phillips was initially reported to be Tony Blair's preferred choice for the role, and when Blair called for the party to swiftly unite behind one candidate, Ken Livingstone, a left-winger and favourite to win the nomination, offered to form a joint ticket with Phillips as his running mate. Phillips described Livingstone's offer as "patronising" in a response that was seen as an accusation of racism, though Phillips later denied this.[5] Following this and other controversies, including his decision to send his children to a private school, Phillips withdrew from the race a few months later and was not on the final shortlist of candidates. Instead, he accepted an offer to be running mate to Frank Dobson.

Although Dobson won the nomination, his candidature was harmed by the perception that the contest was "fixed" by the use of an electoral college.[6] Livingstone ran as an independent and won. The Labour Party designated Phillips as a member of the London Assembly on 4 May 2000 as one of its 'top-up' candidates. Phillips served as chairman of the Assembly until February 2003, before resigning his seat to take up his appointment at the Commission for Racial Equality.

Multiculturalism: disagreements with Ken Livingstone

Phillips and Livingstone had a frosty relationship throughout Phillips' time on the London Assembly, and Phillips' opposition to multiculturalism saw them clash time and again during his tenure at the CRE. In a Times interview in April 2004, Phillips called for the government to reject its support for multiculturalism, claiming it was out of date, and legitimised "separateness" between communities and instead should "assert a core of Britishness".[7]

In 2006, Livingstone accused Phillips of "pandering to the right" so much that he "would soon join the BNP".[8] Phillips himself replied that his views had been "well documented" and "well supported". Phillips has made speeches stating that "it was right to ask hard questions about multicultural Britain". Although he apologised for his presentation of research by the Australian academic Michael Poulsen of statistics on levels of segregation, which had led to some controversy, he welcomed the focus on integration of different communities after the launch of A Commission for Integration and Cohesion.[9] Phillips has subsequently cited recent work by, amongst others, Professor Eric Kaufman of Birkbeck College, London showing that white and non-white segregation in London and Birmingham has increased during the census period to 2011.[10]

After the 2005 riots in France, Phillips warned that "inequality, race and powerlessness" can be "incendiary". He was invited to advise the French government and in September 2007 was awarded the Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur.[11]

Chairman of the EHRC

Phillips' tenure as EHRC chairman was dogged by controversies and internal dissent. Under his leadership it was reported that six of the body's commissioners departed after expressing concerns about his leadership and probity and others were reported to be considering their position.[12][13]

In 2010 Phillips was investigated regarding alleged attempts to influence a committee (the Joint Committee on Human Rights) writing a report on him. He would have been the first non-politician in over half a century to be convicted of this offence, but the Lords Committee found that the allegations were "subjective, and that no firm factual evidence is presented in their support; nor are they borne out by the submissions by individual members of the JCHR."[14] He was cleared of contempt of Parliament and the House of Lords recommended that new and clearer guidance about the conduct of witnesses to Select Committees be issued.[15] However, he was told his behaviour was "inappropriate and ill-advised".[16]

Phillips completed his second term of office in September 2012, which, together with his term at the CRE made him the longest serving leader of any UK equality commission.

In 2006 Phillips has warned that Britain's current approach to multiculturalism could cause Britain to "sleepwalk towards segregation".[17] He expanded on these views in 2016 a publication by Civitas entitled Race and Faith: the Deafening Silence, in which he said that "squeamishness about addressing diversity and its discontents risks allowing our country to sleepwalk to a catastrophe that will set community against community, endorse sexist aggression, suppress freedom of expression, reverse hard-won civil liberties, and undermine the liberal democracy that has served this country so well for so long."[18]

Views on Islam and free speech

Trevor Phillips has spoken on the need for free speech to "allow people to offend each other."[19] These comments came after the protests against the Danish cartoons satirising the Islamic prophet, Muhammad which sparked protests in the Muslim world. He stated in an ITV interview: "One point of Britishness is that people can say what they like about the way we should live, however absurd, however unpopular it is." While supporting free speech, Phillips has spoken out against providing the far right with a platform. Discussing the Oxford Union's invitation to BNP leader Nick Griffin and Holocaust denier David Irving, he told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show: "As a former president of the National Union of Students, I'm ashamed that this has happened. This is not a question of freedom of speech, this is a juvenile provocation. What I would say to students at Oxford is: You're supposed to be brilliant. Put your brains back in your head. People fought and died for freedom of expression and freedom of speech. They didn't fight and die for it so it could be used as a sort of silly parlour game. This is just a piece of silly pranksterism and the issues are too serious to be left to that." Griffin has since hit back at Phillips by declaring him a "black racist" in an interview given to Channel 4.[20]

Opposition to 42-day detention

In early June 2008 Phillips as EHRC head voiced that he "remain[ed] unpersuaded that the government has yet provided compelling evidence for what our legal advice shows would be an effective suspension of some human rights"[21] Phillips was responding to the growing uproar surrounding proposals to amend counter-terrorism legislation to permit 42 days' detention without charge. He raised the possibility of the EHRC legally testing the legislation by judicial review. In the event, the Brown government maintained the limit on detention without charge at 28 days (although in practice a 14-day limit was observed). Following the installation of a Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government the limit was in January 2011 allowed to revert to 14 days.

Comparisons between Britain and the United States

In an article published in 2003,[22] Phillips stated "from Rome, through Constantinople to Venice and London, our (European) nations have a history of peacefully absorbing huge, diverse movements of people, driven by war, famine and persecution; and there is no history of long-term ethnic segregation of the kind one can see in any US city".

In a March 2008 article for Prospect magazine, Phillips was cool on Barack Obama as a potential Presidential candidate, and speculated that if he did become President it might "postpone the arrival of a post-racial America".[23]

Following Obama's election, in an interview for the London Times on 8 November 2008,[24] Trevor Phillips said that he believed it would be impossible for a black candidate in the United Kingdom to rise to the top in politics because of institutional racism within the Labour Party. He said;

If Barack Obama had lived here I would be very surprised if even somebody as brilliant as him would have been able to break through the institutional stranglehold that there is on power within the Labour party.[25]

The comments gained support and criticism from members of ethnic communities in the UK.[26] An article on Phillips in The Independent pointed out the demographic differences between the United Kingdom and the United States, making a comparison untenable. In the United States, non-whites constitute about one third of the population, whereas in the United Kingdom people of non-European ancestry made up less than 10% of the population in 2008.[27]

Broadcasting and writing

Phillips worked initially as a researcher for London Weekend Television (LWT), before being promoted to head of current affairs in 1992, remaining in the post until 1994. He produced and presented The London Programme for LWT and has worked on projects for the BBC and Channel 4. With his brother, the crime writer Mike Phillips, he wrote Windrush: The Irresistible Rise of Multi-racial Britain (1998, HarperCollins, ISBN 0-00-255909-9). He has won three Royal Television Society Awards, including Documentary Series of the Year for Windrush in 1999. He is a Vice President of the RTS.

In March 2015, Channel 4 aired Things We Won't Say About Race (That Are True), a feature-length documentary written and presented by Phillips and co-produced by Pepper Productions and Outline Productions.[28][29] Philips was invited to analyse and interpret the survey for the documentary What British Muslims Really Think aired April 2016, which followed similar themes to Things We Won't Say About Race (That Are True) relating to exploring racial truths through statistics.[30]

Personal life

Phillips married Asha Bhownagary, a Parsi child psychotherapist, in 1981[31] and they have two daughters. They separated in 2008. He married TV producer Helen Veale in September 2013.

That Trevor Phillips got a white woman now. Equal opportunity.

caribny posted:
The fact that YOU dont know anything about it doesnt mean that others dont, nor does it invalidate the fact that these heritage months are celebrated. In a few days its Women's month.

Leave it to you to know all these obscure events that is not mainstream.

Meanwhile DG schooling yuh rass. Look how you didn't know that this gal from black panther was of Guyanese lineage.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/37/Letitia_Wright_by_Gage_Skidmore.jpg/220px-Letitia_Wright_by_Gage_Skidmore.jpg

Zelda Wynn Valdes

Source -- https://www.nytimes.com/intera...ldes-overlooked.html

https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/02/03/obituaries/00overlooked-blh-zeldawynnvaldes1/00overlooked-blh-zeldawynnvaldes1-master675.jpgThe fashion designer Zelda Wynn Valdes, who could fit a dress to a body of any size. Dance Theater of Harlem

More than a half century before a “curvy” model made the cover of the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, and before hashtags like #allbodiesaregoodbodies, there was a designer who knew that it was the job of clothes to fit the woman, not vice versa.

Zelda Wynn Valdes was a designer to the stars who could fit a dress to a body of any size — even if she had to do so just by looking at the client. “I only fit her once in 12 years,” Valdes told The New York Times in 1994 of her long-time client Ella Fitzgerald, “I had to do everything by imagination for her.” Valdes would simply look at Fitzgerald in the latest paper, noting any changes in her full-figured body, and would design the elaborate gowns — with beads and appliques — that she knew Fitzgerald loved.

Valdes began her career in the peak years of Jim Crow segregation, when black seamstresses were largely low-wage earning service industry workers. The title “designer” or “couturier” was typically reserved for esteemed white men.

Seamstresses were deemed problem solvers, while couturiers were lauded as genius innovators. It wouldn’t be easy for Valdes to break the racial barrier into the world of haute couture custom design.

Valdes’s earliest impulses to design clothing likely came not from wanting to dismantle Jim Crow but from a desire to create. She was born on June 18, 1905, into a working-class family in Chambersburg, Pa. Her fondness for sewing and pattern-making developed alongside her training as a classical pianist with the Catholic Conservatory of Music. By the time she was 13, she was a skilled musician who was wowing her family members with the dresses she made for them.

After graduating from high school in the early 1920s, she moved to White Plains, where she got a job at a posh boutique. The position was as a stockroom worker, but Valdes had a plan: She would accept the job in the back, tucked away from white clients, but would eventually shine in the front of the store as a seamstress. And she did. In recalling the job for The New York Times in 1994, she said: “It wasn’t a pleasant time. But the idea was to see what I could do.”

She quickly gained a reputation as a seamstress with a keen, artistic eye and technical precision and opened her own boutique. It was there that she defined her signature style: a mix of the effortless glamour of her grandmother, whose dresses had all been handmade, and the luxury of the boutique’s jetsetter clientele.

Valdes worked with only the finest textiles, and her garments were unabashedly feminine. She turned silk organza, crepe, hammered satin and Italian knit jersey into slinky, curve-hugging evening gowns, with intricate hand beading and sequins. She also made elegant bridal gowns and dresses that could shift from work days to cocktail hours. These garments were the highlights of fashion shows Valdes organized for various black social clubs and fund-raisers in the region.

https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/02/03/obituaries/00overlooked-blh-zeldawynnvaldes3/00overlooked-blh-slide-W27N-master675.jpgNat and Marie Cole at their 1948 wedding in Harlem. The bride’s dress was designed by Valdes. Her clients were at one point paying nearly $1,000 to have a Zelda Wynn Valdes couture gown. Lisa Larsen/The LIFE Images Collection, via Getty Images

The fashion shows helped Valdes find a loyal clientele of black women in New York City, where she opened her boutique, Zelda Wynn, on Broadway and West 158th Street, in 1948. It became a haven for black women who had felt the sting of racism while shopping at white-owned stores. She mostly designed for socialites and the wives of famous black men, such as Edna Mae Robinson, the wife of the boxer Sugar Ray Robinson. She even designed and made all of the bridal attire for the crooner couple Nat King Cole and Maria Ellington.

After the Cole wedding, the glittery stars of screen and stage began seeking her out. She designed clothing for Marian Anderson, Dorothy Dandridge, Josephine Baker, Eartha Kitt, Ruby Dee, Diahann Carroll, Mae West and Marlene Dietrich. Years later, Valdes would tell The Times: “I have a God-given talent for making people beautiful.”

Valdes was also instrumental in forming the National Association of Fashion and Accessories Designers in 1949 to elevate other black female designers while helping them build networks, address discrimination in the workplace and promote racial diversity in the fashion industry.

In the late 1950s, she moved her operation to Midtown, where she opened Chez Zelda. She helmed a staff of nine dressmakers at the new shop, which was adjacent to Carnegie Hall. The location created even more exclusivity around her brand: Valdes was now a queen of the custom market. Her clients were paying nearly $1,000 to have a Zelda Wynn couture gown.

In the early 1960s Valdes forged a relationship with Hugh Hefner and his chain of nightclubs and resorts known as the Playboy Club. Hefner was looking for an outfit for the waitresses, and some have said that he approached Valdes. But there has since been some debate over who came up with the costume’s design.

Journalists writing immediately after Valdes’s death overstated her involvement, even going so far as to say she “invented” the iconic outfit. In recent years, some cultural critics have built upon those stories, further miscrediting Valdes as being the sole creator of the garment.

What’s more plausible is that Valdes and her team were among those commissioned to manufacture some of the garments. Many people were said to have had a hand in the design, and Nancy Deihl wrote in “The Hidden History of American Fashion” (2018) that Valdes and her dressmakers “fabricated at least thirty-five costumes.”

https://static01.nyt.com/images/2019/02/03/obituaries/00overlooked-blh-zeldawynnvaldes2/00overlooked-blh-slide-ZP0E-master675.jpgThe singer Jackie Wilson autographs the cuff of a Playboy Bunny at a dinner for the Motion Picture Pioneers Association at the Playboy Club in 1962 in New York, New York. PoPsie Randolph/Michael Ochs Archives, via Getty Images
What we do know is that by the time Hefner met Valdes, she was just as much of a boss as he was, with the black press touting her as “internationally famous.” Valdes parlayed her relationship with the mogul into an opportunity to expand her brand, hosting dazzling fashion shows before the Playboy Club’s integrated crowd, billed as “Zelda at the Playboy.”

Valdes went on to have a storied career. She later taught fashion design classes to Harlem youth and co-founded the Harlem Youth Orchestra with Lester Wilson in the mid-1960s.

In 1970, she began designing costumes and touring with the Dance Theater of Harlem, a position she would hold for more than two decades. One of Valdes’s innovations was dyeing each dancer’s tights to match their skin tone. Until then, black dancers had spent their careers wearing pink tights that were supposed to mimic the flesh of white dancers, underscoring the racial uniformity of classical ballet.

 

And now — thanks in part to Valdes’s pioneering efforts — dancers of color can buy point shoes in their own skin tone.

By the time Valdes died on Sept. 26, 2001, at 96, she had done it.

She was a couturier.

Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
The fact that YOU dont know anything about it doesnt mean that others dont, nor does it invalidate the fact that these heritage months are celebrated. In a few days its Women's month.

Leave it to you to know all these obscure events that is not mainstream.

Meanwhile DG schooling yuh rass. Look how you didn't know that this gal from black panther was of Guyanese lineage.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/37/Letitia_Wright_by_Gage_Skidmore.jpg/220px-Letitia_Wright_by_Gage_Skidmore.jpg

Leave it to you to not know anything.  You do not watch PBS and HBO Demand because if you did it is well promoted.

caribny posted:
Drugb posted:
caribny posted:
The fact that YOU dont know anything about it doesnt mean that others dont, nor does it invalidate the fact that these heritage months are celebrated. In a few days its Women's month.

Leave it to you to know all these obscure events that is not mainstream.

Meanwhile DG schooling yuh rass. Look how you didn't know that this gal from black panther was of Guyanese lineage.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/37/Letitia_Wright_by_Gage_Skidmore.jpg/220px-Letitia_Wright_by_Gage_Skidmore.jpg

Leave it to you to not know anything.  You do not watch PBS and HBO Demand because if you did it is well promoted.

Oh rass yuh showing off, how you can afford HBO? 

Prashad posted:

Carib instead of thinking about the PPP you should be thinking about all those white women who are ready to open up their legs for your king Kong. Every day is Black History Month for you and them.

 

Poor man, lacking a king kong you envy me.  Your endless obsession with your failure to get white, or white Arab women to like you has been noted.

Drugb posted:
 

Oh rass yuh showing off, how you can afford HBO? 

Cannot help it if you cannot. And yes this woman was revealed to be of Guyanese descent since the film came out and she isnt the only young Guyanese actress to gain success in recent years either.

GNI is NOT a reputable source of information on blacks and for DG to be pretending that he is interested in blacks is amusing.  He doesnt even want to engage the issue of blacks and the PPP.  I know he is afraid to do so given the PPPs sordid record.

Mary Prince
Mary Prince

One of the first black writers to publish a book in England c.1831

Source -- http://100greatblackbritons.com/bios/mary_prince.html

Mary Prince, the daughter of slaves, was born at Brackish Pond, Bermuda, in about 1788. Her father was a sawyer and her mother a house-servant. Mary and her parents were the property of Charles Myners.

When Myners died Mary and her mother were sold to Captain Williams. Mary now became the personal slave of his daughter, Betsey Williams. When she was twelve years old Mary was hired out to another plantation five miles away. Soon afterwards Williams sold her to another family.

Mary Prince worked as a domestic slave and in the fields and during this period she was constantly flogged by her mistress. She later wrote: "To strip me naked - to hang me up by the wrists and lay my flesh open with the cow-skin, was an ordinary punishment for even a slight offence."

Her master later sold her to another man and in 1806 Mary Prince was sent to work on the salt pans of Turk Island. "I was immediately sent to work in the salt water with the rest of the slaves. This work was perfectly new to me. I was given a half barrel and a shovel, and had to stand up to my knees in the water, from four o'clock in the morning till nine, when we were given some Indian corn boiled in water, which we were obliged to swallow as fast as we could for fear the rain should come on and melt the salt."

In 1818 Mary Prince was then sold to John Wood, a plantation owner who lived in Antigua, for $300. She later wrote: My work there was to attend the chambers and nurse the child, and to go down to the pond and wash clothes. But I soon fell ill of the rheumatism, and grew so very lame that I was forced to walk with a stick."

Mary Prince began attending meetings held at the Moravian Church. She later wrote: "The Moravian ladies (Mrs. Richter, Mrs. Olufsen, and Mrs. Sauter) taught me to read in the class; and I got on very fast. In this class there were all sorts of people, old and young, grey headed folks and children; but most of them were free people. After we had done spelling, we tried to read in the Bible. After the reading was over, the missionary gave out a hymn for us to sing."

While in Antigua she met the widower, Daniel Jones, a former black slave who had managed to purchase his freedom. Jones now worked as a carpenter and cooper and asked Mary to marry him. This she agreed to do and got married in the Moravian Chapel in December 1826. John Wood was furious when he found out and once again she had to endure a severe beating with a horsewhip.

John Wood and his wife took her as their servant to London. Soon after arriving in England in 1828 she ran away and went to live at the Moravian Mission House in Hatton Gardens. A few weeks later she went to work for Thomas Pringle, a member of the Anti-Slavery Society. In 1831 Pringle arranged for her to publish her book, The History of Mary Prince, A West Indian Slave. The History of Mary Prince (1831) was the first life of a black woman to be published in Britain. This extraordinary testament of ill-treatment and survival was a protest and a rallying-cry for emancipation that provoked two libel actions and ran into three editions in the year of its publication.

After the publication of the book John Wood sued the publishers of The History of Mary Prince, A West Indian Slave claiming that Mary Prince work had "endeavoured to injure the character of my family by the most vile and infamous falsehoods". Wood lost his case.

Two prominent supporters of slavery in Britain, James MacQueen and James Curtin, took up Wood's case and in an article in Blackwood's Magazine, claimed that Prince's book contained a large number of lies. Prince and her publisher sued MacQueen and Curtin for libel and won their case.

It is thought that Prince remained in England after 1833, perhaps continuing to work as a servant. Her History is an important contribution to early black writing, and it offers a glimpse into the lives of enslaved men and women whose life stories cannot be traced.

Prince posted:
caribny posted:

So after tonight DG will no longer have to pretend to like black people. 

DG has been doing this religiously for many years as I have been on this forum. You are an enemy of yourself.  

I must really "hate" myself for wanting to discuss black history with a bunch of Indo Nazis whose sole purpose in life is to denigrate blacks.

If DG is concerned about blacks he needs to discuss why they hate the PPP and what can they PPP do to change their minds.  Short of that he is wasting his time because many of the frequent posters here can only rant negative things about blacks.  And they can do so freely peddling every white supremacist stereotype.  Only a few condemn them for this.

DG also needs to tell us why, when Yuji spends his days screaming that blacks are stink and too low down to be his in-laws he says nothing.  Even as Yuji is a PPP loyalist.  And Yuji isn't the only one.  We had another one who made David Duke and Donald Trump proud when he used a monkey pic to show what he thought of the black posters here.

caribny posted:
Prince posted:
caribny posted:

So after tonight DG will no longer have to pretend to like black people. 

DG has been doing this religiously for many years as I have been on this forum. You are an enemy of yourself.  

I must really "hate" myself for wanting to discuss black history with a bunch of Indo Nazis whose sole purpose in life is to denigrate blacks.

If DG is concerned about blacks he needs to discuss why they hate the PPP and what can they PPP do to change their minds.  Short of that he is wasting his time because many of the frequent posters here can only rant negative things about blacks.  And they can do so freely peddling every white supremacist stereotype.  Only a few condemn them for this.

DG also needs to tell us why, when Yuji spends his days screaming that blacks are stink and too low down to be his in-laws he says nothing.  Even as Yuji is a PPP loyalist.  And Yuji isn't the only one.  We had another one who made David Duke and Donald Trump proud when he used a monkey pic to show what he thought of the black posters here.

I am proud to say that you and Yuji are two racists in your own rights. I can do without both of you. 

caribny posted:

I must really "hate" myself for wanting to discuss black history with a bunch of Indo Nazis whose sole purpose in life is to denigrate blacks.

If DG is concerned about blacks he needs to discuss why they hate the PPP and what can they PPP do to change their minds.  Short of that he is wasting his time because many of the frequent posters here can only rant negative things about blacks.  And they can do so freely peddling every white supremacist stereotype.  Only a few condemn them for this.

DG also needs to tell us why, when Yuji spends his days screaming that blacks are stink and too low down to be his in-laws he says nothing.  Even as Yuji is a PPP loyalist.  And Yuji isn't the only one.  We had another one who made David Duke and Donald Trump proud when he used a monkey pic to show what he thought of the black posters here.

Don't lie.  DG school yuh rass, nuff ah dem people who achieved excellence you didn't know about Now you can swell your chest even more. 

Meanwhile, every Indo who complain about PNC bullying or complain about their questionable behavior in Guyana, you immediately label as Indo Nazi. 

You want us to capitulate your opinion, but this will not happen, we have our own strong opinions and will speak out against atrocities perpetrated by your beloved PNC goons. 

 

We've never had a Black History Month like this before

Panelist scorches Meadows for 'laughable' display 02:12

Peniel Joseph is the Barbara Jordan Chair in Ethics and Political Values and the founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also a professor of history. He is the author of several books, most recently "Stokely: A Life." The views expressed here are his. View more opinion articles on CNN.

(CNN)The end of February also marked the end of an utterly bizarre Black History Month. It brought us what for many was a long-awaited conversation addressing the ways in which America's discussion of racial injustice has regressed by decades. In a country where Barack Obama was President, public discourse is still dominated by enduring, pernicious tropes such as blackface, cotton, and "some of my best friends are black." Notably, the blackface and cotton episodes occurred in the same state, and featured the same couple: a month that began with Virginia governor Ralph Northam facing calls for his resignation after he admitted to dressing up in blackface ended with his wife Pam under fire for handing cotton to a group of black and white children on a tour of the governor's mansion and, according to the mother of a black child in the group, asking them to imagine being slaves in the fields.

Peniel Joseph
 
Black History 2019 contained plot twists that wove together politics, culture, law enforcement and more into a dizzying national reckoning: politicians in blackface, a white actor who confessed to murderous racist impulses, a black actor who seemingly faked his own hate crime, films about race touching off a firestorm at the Oscars and white fragility about confronting racism unfolding in real-time in the House of Representatives during the Michael Cohen hearing. All of this, implausibly but inexorably, managed to overwhelm the staggering fact that this year represents 400 years since Jamestown, Virginia introduced slavery to colonial North America.
It also managed to overshadow the settlement between Colin Kaepernick and the NFL, a monumental victory for the former quarterback who set the world ablaze by simply taking a knee during the national anthem in protest against police violence against black Americans.
Liam Neeson's awkward confession about his failed efforts to hunt, capture, and kill a random black man after his white friend's sexual assault set the stage for an at-times candid discussion about the roots of anti-black racism. Neeson's openness, while pilloried in some quarters, represents a refreshing departure from the clichéd responses by most whites in the public eye that they are absolutely "not racist!" While Neeson defensively proclaimed the same under intense scrutiny, we are left with hints about the merits of courageous conversations about race, ones where people can admit to racial prejudice -- past or present -- in hopes of bridging political and cultural divides.
 
Virginia first lady criticized for racial insensitivity
 
 
 
 
Virginia first lady criticized for racial insensitivity 03:03
Jussie Smollett's apparent faking of a hate crime in Chicago dominated black Twitter and national news for large chunks of Black History Month. If Smollett -- brilliant, openly gay and charismatic -- began the month standing in a long line of black heroes who faced physical violence just for breathing in their own skin -- by the end he became a cautionary tale, accused of irrevocably damaging future real victims of racial and homophobic violence and hate.
Prince posted:
caribny posted:
 

I am proud to say that you and Yuji are two racists in your own rights. I can do without both of you. 

 I guess I have the audacity to suggest that if DG loves blacks so much he ought to discuss why the relationship between the PPP and blacks is so bad.

What a racist suggestion!   We can hear all day about how bad the PNC is and how Indians suffer but of course discussions from the other perspective are racist.  Interesting.

Drugb posted:
 

Don't lie.  DG school yuh rass, nuff ah dem people who achieved excellence you didn't know about Now you can swell your chest even more. 

Meanwhile, every Indo who complain about PNC bullying or complain about their questionable behavior in Guyana, you immediately label as Indo Nazi. 

You want us to capitulate your opinion, but this will not happen, we have our own strong opinions and will speak out against atrocities perpetrated by your beloved PNC goons. 

Listen go settle yourself with a big black vegetable and stop chatting nonsense.   Your idiocy reaches to manic levels when that craven rises.

DG schooled me on NOTHING.  Given that you anoint yourself as an expert in black history explain what the Reconstruction is and the true story of Rosa Parks.  Also explain the main sources of enslaved peoples into the USA and where each group predominated!   Explain why only 500k slaves were brought to the USA, LESS than that which was brought to Barbados and how the USA has the largest fully black population outside of Africa.

You scream that I know nothing, so answer those questions.  You can get DG to help you.

caribny posted:
Drugb posted:
 

Don't lie.  DG school yuh rass, nuff ah dem people who achieved excellence you didn't know about Now you can swell your chest even more. 

Meanwhile, every Indo who complain about PNC bullying or complain about their questionable behavior in Guyana, you immediately label as Indo Nazi. 

You want us to capitulate your opinion, but this will not happen, we have our own strong opinions and will speak out against atrocities perpetrated by your beloved PNC goons. 

Listen go settle yourself with a big black vegetable and stop chatting nonsense.   Your idiocy reaches to manic levels when that craven rises.

DG schooled me on NOTHING.  Given that you anoint yourself as an expert in black history explain what the Reconstruction is and the true story of Rosa Parks.  Also explain the main sources of enslaved peoples into the USA and where each group predominated!   Explain why only 500k slaves were brought to the USA, LESS than that which was brought to Barbados and how the USA has the largest fully black population outside of Africa.

You scream that I know nothing, so answer those questions.  You can get DG to help you.

Give it a rest, BHM is over. Accept the schooling that DG conferred on to you with humility. Try to get over slavery, we are 2019 now, we had a black president for 2 terms. Old excuses for failure will no longer wash with the people, time to move on. 

Drugb posted:
 

 

Give it a rest, BHM is over. Accept the schooling that DG conferred on to you with humility. Try to get over slavery, we are 2019 now, we had a black president for 2 terms. Old excuses for failure will no longer wash with the people, time to move on. 

There you go.  There is more to black history other than slavery and in fact the ex slaves showed great resiliency as they attempted to dig themselves out of its bad impacts.  If you knew black history you would know this.

PS black history is NEVER over.  This is why you know nothing about black history.

Do you know what Black Wall Street was?  Bet you not.  DG would have to go run and dig up some article, but not know the larger context.

caribny posted:
There you go.  There is more to black history other than slavery and in fact the ex slaves showed great resiliency as they attempted to dig themselves out of its bad impacts.  If you knew black history you would know this.PS black history is NEVER over.  This is why you know nothing about black history.Do you know what Black Wall Street was?  Bet you not.  DG would have to go run and dig up some article, but not know the larger context.

Slavery ended more than 100 years ago but yet you continue to use it as a crutch to justify decay in the Afro community. Do you see the Indos crying about indenture ship? No we have moved on, now it is your turn to do the same and stop playing the slavery card. Look how you always try to find someone else to blame for your problems. 

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