BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:          PAGE 4

 

AL SALEH MOSQUE: SANAA YEMEN

 

The Saleh Mosque or Al Saleh Mosque is the largest and most modern mosque in Sana'a, Yeman. It lies in the southern outskirts of the city, south of the Al Sabeen Maternal Hospital. Inaugurated in November 2008 by Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, it is named in his honor. The mosque is 27,300 square metres (294,000 sq ft) in size, has a central hall which is 13,596 square metres (146,350 sq ft) with an occupancy capacity of 44,000. The building cost nearly US$60 million to construct. Open to non-Muslims, the mosque is frequented by tourists, and promotes moderate Islam. Security measures include police and bomb-sniffing dogs.

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:         

 

AL SALEH MOSQUE: SANAA YEMEN

 

The President of Yemen was criticized in 2008 for undertaking such a grand project when the country was suffering with socio-economic problems. Several accidents occurred during its construction. The minarets collapsed multiple times, resulting in some deaths. After these occurrences, the site was used to build the Islamic college and the garden next to the mosque. It is also mentioned that Hayel Said, a local businessman, was threatened with reprisals and annulment of his business licenses if he did not pay for the building of the mosque. It is also reported that because of the fluid political situation in Yemen where the Zaidi tribal elites are influential, the Saleh's palace mosque was bombed in June 2011 with the president badly injured; the bombing took place at the instigation of tribal elites who supported the youth movement which sought a national leadership change.

The Saleh Mosque appears on Yemeni currency. It is depicted on the face of the 2007 issue 250 rial note.

 

 

 

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:        

 

AL SALEH MOSQUE: SANAA YEMEN

 

The entrance section of the Al Saleh Mosque

 

The mosque was constructed using different types of stone, including black basalt stones as well as limestone in red, white and black. The building is compared in its beauty and architectural elegance with the Masjid al Haram, in Mecca. It was built in a fusion of "Yemeni architecture and Islamic styles", with many Quranic  verses inscribed on the walls. The layout is referred to as "Himyarite architecture". The building has wooden roofs and seven ornate domes. There are five domes in the main roof, the main dome measuring 27.4 metres (90 ft) in diameter with a height of 39.6 metres (130 ft) above the mosque's roof. The other four domes measure 15.6 metres (51 ft) with height of 20.35 metres (66.8 ft) above the roof level of the mosque. Windows fitted with stained glass are locally referred to as qamariyah. Of the fifteen wooden doors, ten of them are situated on the eastern and western sides, and five open south towards the Islamic college and ablution areas. The doors are 22.86 metres (75.0 ft) in height and include engraved copper patterns. Four of the six manarets are 160 metres (520 ft) in height.

 

The interior space is 24 metres (79 ft) from floor to ceiling. While the plush carpeting contains intricate patterns, huge chandeliers have colorful and flower-like patterns. The three-storied building which includes the Quran College, also contains libraries and over two dozen classrooms, enough space to accommodate 600 students. Three large rooms are specifically for women; a small hall can accommodate 2,000 women.

 

The mosque has a modern central air conditioning and sound systems, as well as full security arrangements, including bomb-sniffing dogs. The building stays lit through the night. Thorn Lighting International, through its distributor Al Zaghir, was the lighting contractor. Diah International served as the subcontractor for civil and mechanical engineering; Sodaco Engineering & Contracting also provided services in the building's construction.

 

 

Nice work asj bhai. Keep it up. Don't tek on Sagga bai. All his inanimate lamentations is nonsense given that he carries a crucifix around his neck which, along with the fake image of Jesus on it, are all inanimate objects. But prejudice is so blind that people don't even recognize that they are prejudice. Perhaps he should start a petition to rid the world of all those inanimate buildings built in Jesus' name since they are so bothersome to him.

Originally Posted by skeldon_man:
Originally Posted by yuji22:

Beautiful Mosques.

 

Please post the Mosque at No.70 Village. Berbice.

Yuji bhai,

There are 2 other mosques built in Corriverton. One is near to the Skeldon post office and the other one is by Kingston road. I have 2 friends who attend the Kingston road one.

you should follow their example you old thief

Originally Posted by warrior:
Originally Posted by skeldon_man:
Originally Posted by yuji22:

Beautiful Mosques.

 

Please post the Mosque at No.70 Village. Berbice.

Yuji bhai,

There are 2 other mosques built in Corriverton. One is near to the Skeldon post office and the other one is by Kingston road. I have 2 friends who attend the Kingston road one.

you should follow their example you old thief

Thanks for your advice brother. However, I am not a muslim.

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD

Updating the Mosque for the 21st Century
By Carla Power Thursday, Apr. 02, 2009

The whole world is a mosque, the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) once said. With pious intent, a faithful Muslim can conjure a mosque almost anywhere, transforming a desert sand dune, airport departure lounge or city pavement into a sacred space simply by stopping to pray. The first mosque was Muhammad's mud-brick house in Medina, where a portico of palm-tree branches provided shade for prayer and theological discussion. As the young religion spread, Arabs β€” and later Asians and Africans β€” developed their own ideas of what made a building a mosque. But that innovative spirit has slowed in recent decades, leaving most Islamic skylines dominated by the dome-and-minaret design that first appeared centuries ago.

That's now changing. A new generation of Muslim builders and designers, as well as non-Muslims designing for Muslim groups, often in Europe or North America, are updating the mosque for the 21st century, sparking not just a hugely creative period in Islamic design, but one riven by controversy. The disputes over modern mosques echo larger debates taking place in the Islamic world today about gender, power and, particularly in immigrant communities, Islam's place in Western societies. Even the simplest design decision can reflect questions that are crucial to Islam and its adherents: Should women be allowed in a mosque's main hall or confined to separate quarters? Are minarets necessary in the West, where laws on noise levels mean they are rarely used for the call to prayer? What should a mosque attended by Muslims from different parts of the world look like? The boldest of the new mosques try to answer such questions but are also powerful statements of intent. "Islam wants to proclaim itself," says Hasan-Uddin Khan, an architecture professor at Roger Williams University in Rhode Island. "These new mosques are saying, 'We are here, and we want it to be known that we are here.' "

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD: 

 

THE BAITUN NUR MOSQUE: CALGARY ALBERTA CANADA

 

 

THE BAITUN NUR MOSQUE: CALGARY ALBERTA CANADA

 

Baitun Nur (also spelled Baitunnur or Baitun Noor) (Arabic for "House of Light") is a mosque of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in the Castleridge community of Calgary, Alberta. It is known for being the largest mosque in Canada. It is estimated that there are about 3,000 members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in Calgary.

 

The cornerstone of the mosque was laid in 2005. Construction was completed in 2008 for an estimated cost of C$ 15 million, with roughly C$ 8 million of that coming from local Calgarians.

 

Baitun Nur had its grand opening to the public on July 5, 2008, with 5000 people in attendance, including dignitaries such as Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Opposition Leader StΓ©phane Dion, and Calgary Mayor Dave Bronconnier. The Roman Catholic Bishop of Calgary, Fred Henry, attended as well.[8] Mirza Masroor Ahmad, the supreme head of the worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, oversaw the opening.

While members of various faiths were invited, according to Kaufman of the Edmonton Sun, the Sunni Muslim group Islamic Supreme Council of Canada, led by Syed Soharwardy, was not invited, due to its belief that Ahmadiyya Muslims are not "real" Muslims, and did not consider Baitun Nur a β€œmosque.”

Praise for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community came from attendees, including Harper, who said "Calgarians, Albertans and Canadians will see the moderate, benevolent face of Islam in this mosque and the people who worship here."  According to Embassy magazine, regarding Harper's remarks, a governing party insider said "It's an important signal the prime minister is sending, not just to militant Islamists abroad, but to their sympathizers here at home, that he's perfectly prepared to ignore them and side with persecuted minorities within the faith.

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:

 

SALAHEDDIN ISLAMIC CENTRE: SCARBOROUGH CANADA

 

ProvinceOntario, Canada
MunicipalityScarborough
LeadershipAli Hindy
Capacity2,500

 

This mosque had its bout of problems viz:

 

Located in Scarborough, Ontario Salaheddin Islamic Centre is a Canadian mosque noted for its outspoken Imam Aly Hindy

One of its key founders was Hassan Farhat, although he was made persona non grata by the mosque's administrators and forbidden from continuing to hold any position in the facility; although he was allowed to return for worship. A number of its worshippers have been accused of ties to terrorism, including Ahmed Khadr who ran a charity named Health and Education Project International with ties to the mosque and allegedly funneled money to Afghan training camps.

 

Brothers Saeed and Masoud Rasoul, whose father was a prayer leader at the mosque, later went missing in Iraq, believed to have fought for Ansar al-Islam, possibly at the urging of Farhat.

 

Following the 2006 Toronto terrorism arrests, it emerged that Fahim Ahmad and a number of other suspects were members of the mosque.

During the bail Hearing of Abdullah Khadr in August 2008, the Crown attacked the credibility of the mosque β€” although judge Trotter dismissed the suggestion, referring to testimony from RCMP officer Tarek Mokdad who agreed it was not reasonable to suggest the mosque supported terrorism.

 

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:

 

MOHAMED ALI PASHA MOSQUE: CAIRO EGYPT

 

MOHAMED ALI PASHA MOSQUE: CAIRO EGYPT

 

The great Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha or Alabaster Mosque is a mosque situated in the Citadel of Cairo in Egypt and commissioned by Muhammad Ali Pasha between 1830 and 1848.

 

Situated on the summit of the citadel, this Ottoman mosque, the largest to be built in the first half of the 19th century, is, with its animated silhouette and twin minarets, the most visible mosque in Cairo. The mosque was built in memory of Tasun Pasha, Muhammad Ali's oldest son, who died in 1816.

 

This great mosque, along with the citadel, is one of the landmarks and tourist attractions of Cairo and is one of the first features to be seen when approaching the city from no matter which side.

 

The mosque was built on the site of old Mamluk buildings in Cairo's Citadel between 1830 and 1848, although not completed until the reign of Said Pasha in 1857. The architect was Yusuf Bushnak from Istanbul and its model was the Yeni Mosque in that city. The ground on which the mosque was erected was built with debris from the earlier buildings of the Citadel.

Before completion of the mosque, the alabastered panels from the upper walls were taken away and used for the palaces of Abbas 1. The stripped walls were clad with wood painted to look like marble. In 1899 the mosque showed signs of cracking and some inadequate repairs were undertaken. But the condition of the mosque became so dangerous that a complete scheme of restoration was ordered by King Faud in 1931 and was finally completed under King Farouk in 1939.

Muhammed Ali Pasha was buried in a tomb carved from Carrara marble, in the courtyard of the mosque. His body was transferred here from Hawsh al-Basha in 1857.

 

Last edited by Former Member
 

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:

 

MOHAMED ALI PASHA MOSQUE: CAIRO EGYPT

 

MOHAMED ALI PASHA MOSQUE: CAIRO EGYPT

 

The great Mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha or Alabaster Mosque is a mosque situated in the Citadel of Cairo in Egypt and commissioned by Muhammad Ali Pasha between 1830 and 1848.

 

Situated on the summit of the citadel, this Ottoman mosque, the largest to be built in the first half of the 19th century, is, with its animated silhouette and twin minarets, the most visible mosque in Cairo. The mosque was built in memory of Tasun Pasha, Muhammad Ali's oldest son, who died in 1816.

 

This great mosque, along with the citadel, is one of the landmarks and tourist attractions of Cairo and is one of the first features to be seen when approaching the city from no matter which side.

 

The mosque was built on the site of old Mamluk buildings in Cairo's Citadel between 1830 and 1848, although not completed until the reign of Said Pasha in 1857. The architect was Yusuf Bushnak from Istanbul and its model was the Yeni Mosque in that city. The ground on which the mosque was erected was built with debris from the earlier buildings of the Citadel.

Before completion of the mosque, the alabastered panels from the upper walls were taken away and used for the palaces of Abbas 1. The stripped walls were clad with wood painted to look like marble. In 1899 the mosque showed signs of cracking and some inadequate repairs were undertaken. But the condition of the mosque became so dangerous that a complete scheme of restoration was ordered by King Faud in 1931 and was finally completed under King Farouk in 1939.

Muhammed Ali Pasha was buried in a tomb carved from Carrara marble, in the courtyard of the mosque. His body was transferred here from Hawsh al-Basha in 1857.

 

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