BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:         PAGE 2

 

FRIDAY MOSQUE OF HERAT: AFGHANISTAN

 

THE JAMA MASJID OF HERAT AFGHANISTAN

 

The Jama Masjid of Herat, also known as the Masjid-i Jami' of Herat, and the Great Mosque of Herat is a mosque in the city of Herat, in the HERAT PROVINCE of north-western AFGHANISTAN. It was built by Ghurids, the famous Sultan Ghayas-ud-Din Ghori, who laid its foundation in 1200 AD, and later extended by several rulers as Herat changed rulers down the centuries from the TIMURIDS, to the SAFAVIDS, to the MUGHALS and the UZBEKS, all of whom supported the mosque. Though many of the glazed tiles have been replaced during subsequent periods, the Great Mosque in Herat was given its present form during the closing years of the fifteenth century.

Apart from numerous small neighborhood mosques for daily prayer, most communities in the Islamic world have a larger mosque, a Congregational Mosque for Friday services with a sermon. The Jama Masjid was not always the largest mosque in Herat; a much larger complex the Mosque and Madressa of Gawharshad, also built by the Timurids, was located in the northern part of the city. However, those architectural monuments were dynamited by officers of the British Indian Army in 1885, to prevent its use as a fortress if a Russian army tried to invade India.

 

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:         

 

FRIDAY MOSQUE OF HERAT: AFGHANISTAN

 

THE JAMA MASJID OF HERAT AFGHANISTAN

 

History

The Masjid-i Jami of Herat, the city's first congregational mosque, was built on the site of two smaller Zorastrian fire temples that were destroyed by earthquake and fire. A mosque was begun by the Ghurid ruler Ghiyas ad Din Ghori in 1200 (597 AH), and, after his death, the building was continued by his brother and successor Muhammad of Ghor. This is confirmed both by an inscription on the eastern Ghurid portal uncovered in 1964 during a restoration, and by the sixteenth century Timurid historian Khwandamir in his Khulasat al-Akhbar.

 

In 1221, Genghis Khan conquered the province, and along with much of Herat, the small building fell into ruin. It wasn't until after 1245, under Shams al-Din Kart that any rebuilding programs were undertaken, and construction on the mosque was not started until 1306. However a devastating earthquake in 1364 left the building almost completely destroyed, although some attempt was made to rebuild it. After 1397, the Timurid rulers redirected Herat's growth towards the northern part of the city. This suburbanization and the building of a new congregational mosque in Gawhar Shad's Musalla marked the end of the Masjid-i Jami's patronage by a monarchy. Replacement of the small ruined mosque was done by construction of an entirely new building with surrounding gardens, which was completed by Jalal al-Din Firuzshah, one of the most prominent emirs under Shah Rukh (1405–1444). The decorations alone took over five years to complete, as the emir brought in workers from all over the empire. The mosque was later given a final renovation under the Mughal Empire, when Prince Khurram (Shah Jahan) was fighting for control of the region against the Uzbek tribes

 

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:  

 

KING FAISAL MOSQUE OF PAKISTAN

 

KING FAISAL MOSQUE OF PAKISTAN

 

The Faisal Mosque is the largest Mosque in Pakistan, located in the national capital city of Islamabad. Completed in 1986, it was designed by Turkish Architect Vedat Dalokay to be shaped like a desert Bedouin's tent.

It is situated at the north end of Faisal Avenue, putting it at the northernmost end of the city and at the foot of Margalla Hills, the westernmost foothills of the Himalayas. It is located on an elevated area of land against a picturesque backdrop of the Margalla Hills. This enviable location represents the mosque's great importance and allows it to be seen from miles around day and night.

The Faisal Mosque is conceived as the National Mosque of Pakistan and named after the late King Faisal bin Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia, who supported and financed the project.

The largest mosque in South Asia, the Faisal Mosque was the largest mosque in the world from 1986 until 1993, when it was overtaken in size by the newly completed Hassan II Mosque in Casablanca Morocco. Subsequent expansions of the Masjid al Haram (Grand Mosque) of Mecca and the Al Masjid al Nabawi (Prophet's Mosque) in Medina, Saudi Arabia, during the 1990s relegated Faisal Mosque to fourth place in terms of size.

 

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:

 

THE GRAND MOSQUE OF BAHRAIN

 

THE AL FATEH MOSQUE, AKA THE AL FATEH GRAND MOSQUE OR THE AL FATEH CENTRE OF BAHRAIN

 

The Al-Fateh Mosque (also known as Al-Fateh Islamic Center & Al Fateh Grand MosqueMasjid al-Fatih is one of the largest mosques in the world, encompassing 6,500 square meters and having the capacity to accommodate over 7,000 worshippers at a time. The mosque was built by the late Sheikh Isa ibn Salman Al Khalifa in 1987 and was named after Ahmed Al Fateh, the conqueror of Bahrain. In 2006, Al-Fateh became the site of the National Library of Bahrain.

 

The mosque is the largest place of worship in Bahrain. It is located next to the King Faisal Highway in Juffair, which is a town located in the capital city of Manama. The huge dome built on top of the Al-Fatih Mosque is constructed entirely of fibreglass. Weighing over (60,000 kg), the dome is currently the world's largest fiberglass dome. The marble used in the floors is Italian and the chandelier is from Austria. The doors are made of teak wood from India. Throughout the mosque are calligraphy writings in a very old type of style called Kufic.

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:

 

THE MOSQUE OF DEARBORN MICHIGAN USA

 

THE MOSQUE OF DEARBORN MICHIGAN USA

 

The Islamic Center of America is a Shia mosque located in Dearborn Michigan. Although the institution dates back to 1964, the new mosque opened in 2005. It is the largest mosque in North America and the oldest Shia mosque in the United States. With its large Shia Arab population (consisting mostly of Lebanese), Dearborn is often called the "heart of Shiism" in the United States.

 

The Islamic Center of America is located at 19500 Ford Road in Dearborn. The institution was founded in 1963 by Muhammad Jawad Chitri, who remained its director until his death in 1994. The current Imam is Iraqi-born Sayed Hassan Al Qazwini.

 

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:

 

THE MOSQUE OF BOCA RATON FLORIDA USA

 

File:Mosque in Boca Raton, FL.jpg

Last Updated: 2013-10-19
Address:
Assalam Center 1499 n.w 4th ave Boca Raton FL 33433, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA 
Phone:561-391-8233
Email:assalamcenter@aol.com
URL:www.assalamcenter.org
Directions:hwy 95 to glades rd east on glades rd to n.w 4th ave north on 4th ave you will see the center
General Information:Assalam Center is an Islamic educational and cultural center that caters to the Muslim community of Boca Raton and neighboring cities. It is open to all Muslims regardless of their schools of thought, ethnic background, or nationalities.
The primary purpose of the center is to protect and preserve the Muslim identity and culture of the children and youth, and assisting their families in that endeavor, hence, preparing them to be model citizens.
The Center is open for all 5 daily prayers as well as Friday Prayer.
Sunday Islamic School runs from 10:30 AM to 2:30 PM.
Halal lunch is served at noon on Sunday and after Friday Prayer.
Regular family dinners are organized on most Saturday evenings.
Youth from 15 to 25 years old meet most Thursdays after Maghrib prayers to exchange thoughts on Islamic issues.
 

BEAUTIFUL MOSQUES OF THE WORLD:

 

ISLAMIC CULTURAL CENTER OF NEW YORK

 

File:Islamic Cultural Center E96 jeh.JPG

Looking north at the Islamic Cultural Center on East en:96th Street (Manhattan) on a sunny midday June 25, 2008  Category:Upper East Side


The Islamic Cultural Center of New York is a Mosque and Islamic Cultural Center in the Borough of Manhattan in New York City USA. It is located at 1711 Third Avenue, between East 96th and 97th Streets. The Islamic Cultural Center was the first mosque built in New York City. The mosque's older dwelling in a townhouse at 1 Riverside Drive, is still in continual prayer use as a satellite location.

 

Plans for a large Islamic center in New York were originally drawn up in the late 1960s as the first cultural center occupied a location at 1 Riverside Drive by 72nd street. The first Islamic Center started functioning on a small scale from a modest townhouse at that address. However, the board of trustees later aspired to build a new larger center in a way suiting its prestigious position in the community, and to be one of the landmarks of New York City. Later, an overall project comprising a mosque, a school, a library, a museum, and a lecture hall, were planned out. After years of delays which included raising funds from Muslim countries, a prolonged process of relocating tenants, and the eventual demolition of the buildings on the site; construction of the Islamic Cultural Center began in October 1984. Construction of the associated mosque began on May 28, 1987, the day which corresponded to the end of Ramadan. The cornerstone of the minaret was laid on September 26, 1988.

Construction was delayed during the Iraqi Invasion of Kuwait and the First Gulf War. The mosque opened on April 15, 1991, for the feast of Eid ul Fitr. In the end, more than 46 Muslim Countries made contributions toward the $17 million construction cost of the mosque.

 

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