Skip to main content

Above the law: How Chinese logging firm Bai Shan Lin operates in Guyana, with the support of Bharrat Jagdeo

http://www.redd-monitor.org/20...deo/#comment-1008204

 

 

In November 2012, Chu Wenze, the chairman of Chinese logging company Bai Shan Lin, gave a presentation outlining his company’s plans for Guyana at the 2nd World Congress on Timber & Wood Products Trade in Taicang, China. The company’s plans expose Guyana’s proposals to reduce deforestation and forest degradation as a bunch of lies.

Bai Shan Lin is part of a group of 11 companies operating in Guyana. They are all part of the China Forest Industry Group (Hong Kong). These companies have seven logging concessions in Guyana, covering a total area of 960,000 hectares (about 4.5% of the area of the country).

In November 2012, Whu Wenze and David Dabydeen, Guyana’s Ambassador to China, took part in a signing ceremony for a loan from the Chinese Development Bank for Bai Shan Lin’s forestry projects in Guyana.

According to Chu Wenze’s presentation, the company hopes to make a profit of US$1,800 per hectare from its logging concession in Guyana, giving a total profit of US$1.7 billion. The presentation is available here (pdf file, 2.4 MB).

 

 

The company’s concessions are illustrated in one of the slides in Chu Wenze’s presentation:

 

According to the website Global Timber, these concessions were taken over from other concession holders, a process known as “landlording” which is illegal in Guyana (unless officially authorised by the President). Under Guyanese law, forest concessions cannot be traded, but must be re-advertised by the Forestry Commission in an open auction.

Last week, Bai Shan Lin ignored a cease order issued by the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission at a sand excavation pit in Moblissa. The company has received no permission for excavation work in the area and this is the third time that the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission has issued a cease order. Bai Shan Lin has also started construction of a road, without any permission.

Despite the company’s record, among its supporters is Guyana’s ex-President Bharrat Jagdeo. His photograph is included in Chu Wenze’s presentation, as part of the Guyanese Project Promotion Team for an Economic and Trading Cooperation Park that Bai Shan Lin is developing in Guyana.

 

Other members of the Project Promotion Team include Guyana’s President, Donald Ramotar, and Prime Minister, Sam Hinds.

Bharrat Jagdeo is currently the roving ambassador for the Three Basins Initiative, part of which seems to include begging the international community for more money to stop deforestation. Meanwhile, back in Guyana, he’s promoting a Chinese logging company, which seems to be operating above the law.


 

 

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Originally Posted by Nehru:

lIKE uNCLE bHARAT STII GAT KICK IN HIM.. mITS, lEAVE THE MAN ALONE TODAY LEH HE ENJOY THE cRICKET mATCH NAH.

Bhaiji, I give him full credits for the Norway Initiative. However, look at how Guyana is divided up as shown by the 7 arrows and over 1,000,000 hectares, worth billions of US dollars, handed over to the Chinese for peanuts.

The company’s concessions are illustrated in one of the slides in Chu Wenze’s presentation:

 

According to the website Global Timber, these concessions were taken over from other concession holders, a process known as “landlording” which is illegal in Guyana (unless officially authorised by the President). Under Guyanese law, forest concessions cannot be traded, but must be re-advertised by the Forestry Commission in an open auction.

Last week, Bai Shan Lin ignored a cease order issued by the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission at a sand excavation pit in Moblissa. The company has received no permission for excavation work in the area and this is the third time that the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission has issued a cease order. Bai Shan Lin has also started construction of a road, without any permission.

Despite the company’s record, among its supporters is Guyana’s ex-President Bharrat Jagdeo.

Exotic, pricey wood species being shipped out of Guyana

August 17, 2014 | By | Filed Under News 

As the controversy surrounding Bai Shan Lin’s operations in Guyana continues, the main question is why the company is exporting large quantities of exotic woods such as “Locust and Wamara”. Conservationists have been arguing that countries where these “exotic” woods are found should not export large quantities since they are considered an “invasive species”. Invasive species, also called invasive exotics or simply exotics, is a nomenclature term and categorization phrase used for flora and fauna, and for specific restoration-preservation processes in native habitats, with several definitions. Sometimes called Guyana Rosewood for its lustrous, dense, and colour, Wamara technically isn’t true rosewood (Dalbergia genus), but is in what could arguably be viewed as one of the most under-appreciated genera of tropical hardwoods: Swartzia. This genus is filled with a variety of colorful and striped woods, most of which remain obscure. It is considered an “exotic wood” in many parts of the world. The Locust tree is native to the southeastern United States, but has been widely planted and naturalized elsewhere in temperate North America, Europe, Southern Africa and Asia and is considered an invasive species in some areas. Pricing for the species… Bai Shan Lin on July 2009, last, exported 558 pieces of Locust Sawn Timber from Guyana. In October 2009, the company also exported Wamara Sawn Timber. A total of 5303 pieces were sent out in two PAGE 15containers. World Market demand for these two species of wood could fetch a heavy price.  The “Wamara” which is being sold by the cubic meter can fetch a price of between US$200 and US$600. Kaieteur News was told that the “Wamara” logs can be sold from between US$260 and US$290. Depending on the demand, the prices can triple, making it one of the best selling timber products being exported. It is believed that Bai Shan Lin and other logging companies have not been declaring “Wamara and Locust” when exporting. Rather they have been passing this off as mixed hard woods. Several sources within the Ministry of Natural Resources have said that the Wamara business is among the most lucrative business ventures that Bai Shan Lin is currently involved in. This newspaper was also told that low level ministry workers along with forestry officials who are tasked with monitoring the export of timber are not able to complete their task. It is being reported that since Bai Shan Lin along with several others entered into joint ventures, it has been “almost impossible” to keep a tab on how much timber is being exported from Guyana. Bai Shan Lin, a Chinese logging company, has big plans for Guyana: forest concessions covering 960,000 hectares; a 20-kilometre river gold mining concession; a 500-hectare Guyana-China Timber Industry Economic and Trading Cooperation Park and a 160-hectare real estate development. Despite the scale of the planned operations, Bai Shan Lin’s agreements with the government of PAGE 16 AND 57Guyana are not public and there has been no discussion in the National Assembly about the company’s plans. In Guyana, it is illegal for a logging company to take over another logging company’s operation, unless officially authorised by the President. Yet Bai Shan Lin has managed to enter into large scale joint ventures with a number of locals.

Add Reply

Post

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×