Skip to main content

Reply to "Why Italy is going all out to win the Bocuse d'Or culinary contest"

Taste of pride

ench chef Thibaut Ruggeri celebrates as he wins the final of the international culinary competition of the Bocuse d'Or in 2013

France has won the contest seven times, most recently with chef Thibaut Ruggeri in 2013.
JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images
Even without the pasta, Italy is out to tell the world it can win the Bocuse d'Or.
"We want our cuisine to taste of national pride", says Crippa.
Ruggieri is preparing to flex his muscles. He'll be trained according to high standards, including cleanliness levels and the environmental impact of his dishes, how tidy he leaves the kitchen after the cooking and how much food is wasted in the preparation.
It's like when Italy's football squad sets out to win the world cup -- exercising seven days per week is crucial -- in a setting that recreates the original battle field.
"We've never had any serious training in this for the Bocuse d'Or, no real money invested, no sacrifices.
"Somehow we never took it seriously. But now, thanks to this new academy, our champion will get all the support he needs", says Baronetto, who is an expert of technical rules.

×
×
×
×
×