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Reply to "Guyanese join in NY celebrations for 70th anniversary of Indian independence."

seignet posted:

In 1947, as Pandit Nehru was making his famous Independence Speech at the Red Fort, some thousands of miles away in British Guiana, it was noon time the following day. Gathered were Hindu Indians (probably born in India) on the Albion Bridge. They celebrated with the regular Indian sweets, flags and clip-on buttons of the Indian Tri-color flag. Bicycles wheels decorated with multi-color crepe paper, box carts drawn by people and bicycles, multi-color spinning wheels in a cluster-a scene typical of a 1947 Hindi movie.

Every one dressed in the typical Indian white attire, trousers, kurta and Nehru Style topi. Women in long skirts, sleeved jackets, urniee, and as usual, jewelled.

I remembered the sun being hot that day. Peering through my Patti's and Tatta's Wallaba Picket Fench to see all the people on the bridge, drumming and singing. 

I caught the glimpse of a young girl in her celebrations, she raced accross the rickety bridge over the trench to the wooden garrison style house in the fenched yard. The span of the plank created a harmonic response as she quickly strode on it.

She threw open the gate bearing gifts. As with all children, I hasten to her with outstretched hands. In April, I had turned 2 years old.

Landoo, gulabjamoo, jilabee, bandamlach, satwah, ball of parched rice, gulgulah, manborg, barra, poulowrie and much more. Too much for me to hold on to, my Patti came to the rescue.

Smiling, the young girl patiently pinned the button of the Tri-Color Indian Flag on my shirt.

And in parting, she gave me a Spinning Wheel.

Fascinated with the colors of the flag, I kept it for years, well into teen age years.

The Spinning Wheel was more of the excitment, I ran with it and realized it spun faster. Perhaps, my first inclination of an Engineering pre-occupation.

I watched the procession from the landing as they faded from view heading to the logies of Plantation Albion, in celebartions.

Perhaps, some wealthy Indian in Albion had a radio set, and they may have heard the voice of Prime Minister Pandit Nehru and his famous words. 

 

Very nice. Brings back lots of memories. I remember the Spinning Wheel and the flying of kites at #63 beach.

Btw, the sweet is not "landoo" it's laddoo..

The peeps from Albion/Port Mourant would say "Patti" and " Taataa"; in Canje, the say "Aajee" and "Aaja" for paternal grand mother and grand father respectively.

In my village, I remember the exchange of sweets by various homes. There was also "Mitai". Image result for indian flag emoji

Last edited by Mitwah

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