PPP/C vows to ensure land titles, extension coverage for all Amerindian villages

PPP/C vows to ensure land titles, extension coverage for all Amerindian villages - at meeting in Paramakatoi

Written by
Thursday, 10 November 2011 02:16
Source - Guyana Chronicle

President Bharrat Jagdeo, Presidential Candidate, Donald Ramotar and Presidential Adviser on Governance, Gail Teixeira greeting Paramakatoi residents on their way to a village meeting

THE ruling People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) has vowed to work diligently to ensure all Amerindian villages are titled and extensions are granted, though acknowledging that the venture is costly. This was the assurance given when the ruling party, led by President Bharrat Jagdeo and Presidential Candidate, Donald Ramotar visited Paramakatoi, Region 8 for a public meeting with residents.

Among those present were Presidential Adviser on Governance Gail Teixeira and Harripersaud Nokta.

“This is a commitment that the PPP has made,” President Jagdeo said, debunking rumours of a plot to confiscate lands from Amerindians.

“We have been in office for more than 15 years now, and you ask a single community in Guyana if we have ever taken away land from them… the answer will be no,” President Jagdeo said.

Speaking to residents in the Paramakatoi primary school, the Head of State implored residents to ignore rumours that are maliciously spread in this regard, pointing a finger at the Amerindian People’s Association (APA).

Presidential Candidate, Donald Ramotar speaking to Paramakatoi residents during a village meeting

“They receive a lot of money from abroad… they sit in Georgetown and they come to these communities and spread rumours that the Toshaos want to sell out their land and that the government will take away their land,” President Jagdeo said.

The few that have refused the land demarcation exercise are those which President Jagdeo said have followed the advice of the APA, and are at present stalled, while other villages that have heeded have advanced developmentally.

He made reference to an injunction filed by some communities in the Upper Mazaruni, Region 7, that has prohibited any action by the government to fast track the land demarcation exercise for those villages.

“Most of the Toshaos in Region 9, Region 1, Region 10 and the other areas… those villages have their titles, their extension, because they have rejected the APA,” President Jagdeo said.

Amerindians were also cautioned about buying into rumours which he believes quickly become fact in hinterland communities, and said that the effort pursued by Government in the area of land demarcation is unprecedented.

“Under the PNC, there was no land tenure. Although the areas were identified, there was no land demarcation of the territories so people couldn’t have a title where they could defend their lands, and that’s why coastlanders and miners and forestry people encroached on Amerindian lands,” President Jagdeo said.

The Amerindian Act of 2006 has enshrined the right of indigenous people to their land and obligates government to respond to any request for land demarcation within a stipulated time period.

Amerindians also have veto power to any request for mining; and if a request is granted, a royalty of seven percent must be paid. Additionally, villages have been given the power and autonomy to craft their own rules.

Ramotar, in his remarks, reflected on the living standards in Amerindian communities under the PNC, and the limitations.

“In the Amerindian communities, they (PNC) never built a secondary school and the primary schools themselves were in awful condition.

Many times they did not even have chalk to give to teachers. Many of the teachers were coming from the coastland,” Ramotar.

Ramotar said that it was under the PPP/C administration that this “unfortunate” situation was redressed, with the construction of secondary schools in Amerindian communities, the provision of hot meals, distribution of uniforms, text books, scholarships to tertiary and technical education and overseas.

The investment, according to Ramotar, is paying off, pointing to the students from Waramadong who are passing with flying colours and topping the country at the Caribbean Secondary Examination Council (CSEC) level.

Access to primary education for hinterland students is today 100 percent, and secondary education is increasing with schools in Santa Rosa, Waramadong, Three Mile, Aishalton, Annai, Kwakwani, St. Cuthbert’s Mission, Port Kaituma, North West and the Sand Creek secondary schools.

The scholarship programme over the years has improved under the current administration, and has led to 450 students acquiring scholarships.

They have been complemented by others who access technical and tertiary education at the Guyana School of Agriculture, The Government Technical Institute, and the Carnegie School of Home Economics.(GINA)
Original Post
quote:

“Under the PNC, there was no land tenure. Although the areas were identified, there was no land demarcation of the territories so people couldn’t have a title where they could defend their lands, and that’s why coastlanders and miners and forestry people encroached on Amerindian lands,” President Jagdeo said.

The Amerindian Act of 2006 has enshrined the right of indigenous people to their land and obligates government to respond to any request for land demarcation within a stipulated time period.

Great to hear this wonderful news. Amerindians do not forget how much they were abandoned under the PNC, and they know that PPP/C has been making every effort to look out for their needs.

I am very pleased to know how far they have come and how far yet to go:

"The Amerindian Act of 2006 has enshrined the right of indigenous people to their land and obligates government to respond to any request for land demarcation within a stipulated time period....

....Ramotar, in his remarks, reflected on the living standards in Amerindian communities under the PNC, and the limitations.

In the Amerindian communities, they (PNC) never built a secondary school and the primary schools themselves were in awful condition...."
The Amerind act of 206 is a hack job. It is no document to liberate us but to put us at the boot of the PPP. It has been 2 decades and we do not have our lands. Yet and Indian furniture maker got 4% of Guyana's land mass!
If this is true, this is not right. But let us look at the difference between residential land and land for business development. Any info. would be helpful.

There is no question, more needs to be done for the first nations people of Guyana.
quote:
Originally posted by Catherine:
If this is true, this is not right. But let us look at the difference between residential land and land for business development. Any info. would be helpful.

There is no question, more needs to be done for the first nations people of Guyana.
so what were they doing for 20 yrs.why they did not do it already.oh they just know that the amerindians is guyanese citzens
quote:
Originally posted by Catherine:
If this is true, this is not right. But let us look at the difference between residential land and land for business development. Any info. would be helpful.

There is no question, more needs to be done for the first nations people of Guyana.
As a Guyanese and an advocate for the PPP and one making declarative statements ie "Amerindians do not forget how much they were abandoned under the PNC, and they know that PPP/C has been making every effort to look out for their needs", you shoud not then take refuge in conditional statements ie "If this is true.."
You should know to what you refer and have come to an independent conclusion as the the status of the issue at hand. The PNC and the PPP pursued a program of aggressive wardship, indirect rule and assimilation of amerind peoples. They reduced the conditions for the founding of the state of Guyana with respect to Amerinds to conditions to be met by Amerindians with respect to the state. The act of 1951, and all that superseded it has been reduced to a obfuscating tome that has native peoples at the boot of the administration. And soulless amerinds like Pearson and my cousins in government need to go back to the bush and do penance.
It appears to me that if the PPP/C had not taken a serious look at Amerindian affairs, they would not be making the progress they are (as compared with the abandonment they experienced under the PNC).

As far as I know, the Ministry of Amerindian affairs have been doing a great job making inroads in this area (see below).

I was curious what you mean about "we do not have our lands" - What would you say about 'land' on the whole for Amerindians and for Guyana? How is land distributed? What have you seen done in the past years?

As for your cousins, they know what's best for them - to join the PPP/C in its efforts to make Guyana a better place for all Guyanese (Amerindian included) and I am sure they are advocating for a good thing - equity.


Excerpt: Ministry of Amerindian Affairs:

http://www.amerindian.gov.gy/
"Gov’t fulfills promise to Region 9 - third phase of support rolls out

The PPP/C administration, as promised, delivered on its pledge of making available monetary support for residents in Region Nine who were affected by flooding in July. A sum of $20,000 was presented to each affected farmer and household, particularly those who were severely affected.

During the start of the recovery, emphasis was placed on food availability and food production. As such several communities were presented with farming supplies including chemicals to treat acoushi ants, spray cans, a variety of seeds, mineral blocks, storage containers, cassava mills and small water pumps.

The communities that benefited from today’s exercise include Karasabai, Wichabai, Tiger Pond, Taushida, Yurong Paru, and Pai Pang.Read More

Amerindian Heritage Day of Sports a success

Several prizes and awards were handed over during the closing ceremonies of the two-day Sports and Family Fun day organized by the Ministry of Amerindian Affairs in observance of Amerindian Heritage Month 2011 on September 18, 2011 at the Carifesta Sports Complex, Carifesta Avenue, Georgetown. Read More



Miss Region Three crowned Miss Amerindian Heritage Queen 2011

Miss Naomie Samuels, of Santa Mission Village, Region Three captured the coveted crown of Miss Amerindian Heritage Queen 2011 after a neck-and-neck competition with Miss Treasure James of the Mabaruma Sub-district, Region One as the curtains to the much anticipated Miss Amerindian Heritage Pageant 2011 came down Saturday evening, September 17, 2011 at the National Cultural Centre. Read More



Option of computers in every Amerindian home to be tested

The establishment of a bank of computers in each Amerindian village is still on the cards but the option of distributing devices to individual households in the hinterland will be tested, according to President Bharrat Jagdeo. Read More



Region 9 residents trained in installation, maintenance of solar home systems

Region 9 residents on Friday last, completed a five-day training session by technicians from the Hinterland Electrification Unit of the Office of the Prime Minister dealing with installation and maintenance of the 65-Watt solar systems which will be distributed as soon as training for all stakeholders concludes. Read More
Actually, I have not been to this site for a long time and I very happy to see the work they are doing. More to do I of course.

On the whole, first nations people around the globe - US, Canada, Australia, Surinam - suffer and for this reason, Govt. must take action to correct the past and pave way for the future.

I do not agree that 'assimilation' is being pushed, but rather a conscious value of cultural identity.
quote:
Originally posted by Catherine:
It appears to me that if the PPP/C had not taken a serious look at Amerindian affairs, they would not be making the progress they are (as compared with the abandonment they experienced under the PNC).

As far as I know, the Ministry of Amerindian affairs have been doing a great job making inroads in this area (see below).

I was curious what you mean about "we do not have our lands" - What would you say about 'land' on the whole for Amerindians and for Guyana? How is land distributed? What have you seen done in the past years?

As for your cousins, they know what's best for them - to join the PPP/C in its efforts to make Guyana a better place for all Guyanese (Amerindian included) and I am sure they are advocating for a good thing - equity.


Excerpt: Ministry of Amerindian Affairs:

http://www.amerindian.gov.gy/
"Gov’t fulfills promise to Region 9 - third phase of support rolls out

The PPP/C administration, as promised, delivered on its pledge of making available monetary support for residents in Region Nine who were affected by flooding in July. A sum of $20,000 was presented to each affected farmer and household, particularly those who were severely affected.

During the start of the recovery, emphasis was placed on food availability and food production. As such several communities were presented with farming supplies including chemicals to treat acoushi ants, spray cans, a variety of seeds, mineral blocks, storage containers, cassava mills and small water pumps.

The communities that benefited from today’s exercise include Karasabai, Wichabai, Tiger Pond, Taushida, Yurong Paru, and Pai Pang.Read More

Amerindian Heritage Day of Sports a success

Several prizes and awards were handed over during the closing ceremonies of the two-day Sports and Family Fun day organized by the Ministry of Amerindian Affairs in observance of Amerindian Heritage Month 2011 on September 18, 2011 at the Carifesta Sports Complex, Carifesta Avenue, Georgetown. Read More



Miss Region Three crowned Miss Amerindian Heritage Queen 2011

Miss Naomie Samuels, of Santa Mission Village, Region Three captured the coveted crown of Miss Amerindian Heritage Queen 2011 after a neck-and-neck competition with Miss Treasure James of the Mabaruma Sub-district, Region One as the curtains to the much anticipated Miss Amerindian Heritage Pageant 2011 came down Saturday evening, September 17, 2011 at the National Cultural Centre. Read More



Option of computers in every Amerindian home to be tested

The establishment of a bank of computers in each Amerindian village is still on the cards but the option of distributing devices to individual households in the hinterland will be tested, according to President Bharrat Jagdeo. Read More



Region 9 residents trained in installation, maintenance of solar home systems

Region 9 residents on Friday last, completed a five-day training session by technicians from the Hinterland Electrification Unit of the Office of the Prime Minister dealing with installation and maintenance of the 65-Watt solar systems which will be distributed as soon as training for all stakeholders concludes. Read More
The minister of Amerind affairs is a creature of the PPP. She does not represent our rights. We want that crappy document redefined. As Guyana reflects on its legacy of colonial documents to delimit its borders we want the same. Tell the PPP to shove it if they will decide what are the defining criteria. All other issues are just bead trading. Either we are on our way to being recognized cultural peoples with a right to our ancestral spaces or the PPP can go suck an egg.
quote:
Originally posted by Catherine:
It appears to me that if the PPP/C had not taken a serious look at Amerindian affairs, they would not be making the progress they are (as compared with the abandonment they experienced under the PNC).

As far as I know, the Ministry of Amerindian affairs have been doing a great job making inroads in this area (see below).

I was curious what you mean about "we do not have our lands" - What would you say about 'land' on the whole for Amerindians and for Guyana? How is land distributed? What have you seen done in the past years?

As for your cousins, they know what's best for them - to join the PPP/C in its efforts to make Guyana a better place for all Guyanese (Amerindian included) and I am sure they are advocating for a good thing - equity.


Excerpt: Ministry of Amerindian Affairs:

http://www.amerindian.gov.gy/
"Gov’t fulfills promise to Region 9 - third phase of support rolls out

The PPP/C administration, as promised, delivered on its pledge of making available monetary support for residents in Region Nine who were affected by flooding in July. A sum of $20,000 was presented to each affected farmer and household, particularly those who were severely affected.

During the start of the recovery, emphasis was placed on food availability and food production. As such several communities were presented with farming supplies including chemicals to treat acoushi ants, spray cans, a variety of seeds, mineral blocks, storage containers, cassava mills and small water pumps.

The communities that benefited from today’s exercise include Karasabai, Wichabai, Tiger Pond, Taushida, Yurong Paru, and Pai Pang.Read More

Amerindian Heritage Day of Sports a success

Several prizes and awards were handed over during the closing ceremonies of the two-day Sports and Family Fun day organized by the Ministry of Amerindian Affairs in observance of Amerindian Heritage Month 2011 on September 18, 2011 at the Carifesta Sports Complex, Carifesta Avenue, Georgetown. Read More



Miss Region Three crowned Miss Amerindian Heritage Queen 2011

Miss Naomie Samuels, of Santa Mission Village, Region Three captured the coveted crown of Miss Amerindian Heritage Queen 2011 after a neck-and-neck competition with Miss Treasure James of the Mabaruma Sub-district, Region One as the curtains to the much anticipated Miss Amerindian Heritage Pageant 2011 came down Saturday evening, September 17, 2011 at the National Cultural Centre. Read More



Option of computers in every Amerindian home to be tested

The establishment of a bank of computers in each Amerindian village is still on the cards but the option of distributing devices to individual households in the hinterland will be tested, according to President Bharrat Jagdeo. Read More



Region 9 residents trained in installation, maintenance of solar home systems

Region 9 residents on Friday last, completed a five-day training session by technicians from the Hinterland Electrification Unit of the Office of the Prime Minister dealing with installation and maintenance of the 65-Watt solar systems which will be distributed as soon as training for all stakeholders concludes. Read More
catherine i dont know which part of guyana you living,but almost every Amerindian i know ,is working is a chineses restaurant and bar or doing gaurd work.and when you go to their house is about 20 of them living in one house.and i can tell you some time they eat one meal a day.so dont tell me what the government is doing for these people
quote:
Originally posted by D2:
The minister of Amerind affairs is a creature of the PPP. She does not represent our rights. We want that crappy document redefined. As Guyana reflects on its legacy of colonial documents to delimit its borders we want the same. Tell the PPP to shove it if they will decide what are the defining criteria. All other issues are just bead trading. Either we are on our way to being recognized cultural peoples with a right to our ancestral spaces or the PPP can go suck an egg.[/QUOTE]

It is understandable. Many hinderances frustrate more progress. Patience, patience...

Amerindians are recognized as a cultural people of the Guyanese landscape. Ancestral spaces are being preserved. More to come...

Will that be duck egg or chicken egg? Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by Catherine:
God will save the PPP/C for more progress to come.
This has nothing to do with god. The PPP are godless men anyways. It has to do with the tyranny of men and the inevitable of resistance to it. Native peoples in the entire South America are in arms against usurpation of their patrimony. Why do you think their anger will not come like a cold wind of realism to the oppressors in the PPP?
quote:
Originally posted by Billy Ram Balgobin:
D2 is an agnostic. GNI is his shrine.
First, I am an atheist as Bhuddist are. I live by a creed that the inanimate stone can be god if you feel inclined to worship it.

However, it would be wise to respect it and understand you are not superior to it or anything in the 'verse. All are one. And there is no need for a shrine to such a conception of godliness.
Minister Sukhai visits Kaikan

- urges residents to build partnerships

Georgetown, GINA, October 17, 2011

The Amerindian Affairs Ministry has held another community outreach, this time to Kaikan, Region Seven where Minister Pauline Sukhai and National Toshao Council (NTC) Chairperson Yvonne Pearson and other officials from the Ministry met with the community to discuss issues of concerns related to land demarcation, water and health among others.

Minister Sukhai engaged residents in discussions about their decision not to accept land demarcation since that community has been pushing for ownership of what they refer to as their traditional lands.

NTC Chairperson Yvonne Pearson (standing) speaking to residents. At left are Minister of Amerindian Affairs Pauline Sukhai and Toshao Claude Anselmo. At far right is Principal Regional Development Officer of the Ministry Anil Roberts.

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