Number 11 Village-Corentyne,Berbice.

Source

Number 11 Village, Corentyne, Berbice is a small village with a population of just over 300 people. However, the village is popular for its large-scale fishing. While most residents earn their living from fishing and cattle rearing, others are attached to the sugar estates in the region or operate small businesses, like groceries and beer gardens.

This village is predominantly Indian and has no place of worship, no school, no community centre, police station, health centre or playfield.

If you travel from New Amsterdam, you get to the village directly after you pass the ancient now demolished toll gate.

Residents said the village, which consists of two short cross streets has always been peaceful and quiet. They also noted that most persons have migrated to foreign countries over the years.

Varone Paul, 58, who has resided in the village all of her life, said she enjoys living there. However, she noted that the bridge over the trench which leads to her house lot needs immediate repairs. Paul said it has been years now that residents have been complaining about the bridge but nothing has been done as yet. She explained that residents have been coming together and repairing parts of the bridge by replacing “old boards”, however, she noted that they alone cannot afford to fix the entire bridge.

She stressed that she along with the other residents would be grateful if the regional officials would step in and offer some assistance by fixing the bridge.

Number 11 Village, Corentyne, Berbice is a small village with a population of just over 300 people. However, the village is popular for its large-scale fishing. While most residents earn their living from fishing and cattle rearing, others are attached to the sugar estates in the region or operate small businesses, like groceries and beer gardens.

This village is predominantly Indian and has no place of worship, no school, no community centre, police station, health centre or playfield.

If you travel from New Amsterdam, you get to the village directly after you pass the ancient now demolished toll gate.

Residents said the village, which consists of two short cross streets has always been peaceful and quiet. They also noted that most persons have migrated to foreign countries over the years.

Varone Paul, 58, who has resided in the village all of her life, said she enjoys living there. However, she noted that the bridge over the trench which leads to her house lot needs immediate repairs. Paul said it has been years now that residents have been complaining about the bridge but nothing has been done as yet. She explained that residents have been coming together and repairing parts of the bridge by replacing “old boards”, however, she noted that they alone cannot afford to fix the entire bridge.

She stressed that she along with the other residents would be grateful if the regional officials would step in and offer some assistance by fixing the bridge.

Paul’s daughter, Chandrawattie Paul, also known as ‘Priya’, 20, said she recently gave birth to her first child and it is unsafe for her to use the bridge. She worries that one day she could be crossing the bridge with her son and it could collapse. She said it is dangerous and should be fixed as soon as possible before something happens and persons get hurt.

The Pauls noted that the villagers are co-operative but there is only so much they can afford to do.

Meanwhile, World Beyond Georgetown caught up with, Kennard (only name given), a father of two, who was on his way to catch fish. He said that while he has a permanent job, selling the fish he catches helps him to meet his financial obligations. “This trench right here in the village we does catch fish,” he said, “Mostly tilapa we does catch.”

One of the oldest villagers, Pram, said that before “old age” he used to catch fish and sell at the now defunct Sheet Anchor Market. He now stays active by planting his garden.

Kishan, who is a construction worker, was also fishing in the Number 11 trench, known as, “Salt Trench.” He stressed that while he fishes to earn an extra dollar, it is something he quite enjoys. He pointed out that since the trench is in the village it makes it a lot easier to fish.

Another villager, Esther Peters, also spoke of the bridge that needs fixing. She said, “Me and my mother sickly, if we take in night time we can’t get one car to come in and take us hospital.” The villager told World Beyond Georgetown that there are many school children in the village, however, it was highlighted that one family has several children, who are not attending school because “dem poor, de man can’t afford to send dem.”

The villagers also highlighted that since it is 2017, and their village has been in existence for over 50 years, it should have land line telephones. “Dem promise us to put in phone and so, we na get it yet. You a feel fa leff this village cause like dem forget bout abie,” Peters said.

Meanwhile, one of the two shopkeepers in the village, Sharmila Bronne, 48, said she has operated her grocery and beer garden for over ten years. She complained about business declining gradually over the years. She also voiced her frustration at the new taxes that have been implemented, opining that it has now become more difficult to run a successful small business in Guyana. “With all dem taxes what you go sell fa get lil money?” she questioned.

“Business was better years ago because we na had all them taxes here. You cannot say you making profit because what profit really you making with all them taxes? Den estate closing; what gun happen to dem people? And who gun buy from me?”

The other shopkeeper, Baby Hemchand, 27, who operates Suraj Grocery and Liquor opposite Bronne, said business has “slowed up” tremendously over the past few years. She noted that since it is a slow area and not heavily populated there is not much room for her business to flourish.

Touching on crime, the woman said that her business has been robbed three times since being in operation. The most serious and recent robbery was in 2011, where approximately five perpetrators invaded her home armed with guns and cutlasses and her robbed her of money and jewelry.

She recalled the horrid night on which the bandits attacked her husband. She said they beat him mercilessly and chopped him about four times, the most severe chop wound being on his head.

“That time me had me son alone and me husband was sick. We didn’t had grill, we had board and dem knock off the board and come in and he [her husband] pull one cutlass but he couldn’t do nothing. As soon as dem enter de house dem start chop,” she recalled.

After that incident they closed their business in fear that the perpetrators might return. However, she said, the ordeal left her husband not being able to do heavy work owing to his head injury. As such about one year later they decided to return home and reopen their business in the hope that they would never be victims again. The wife said, “If me hear anything knock and so me a tell he is na nothing. Even if me frighten me a tell he na worry because de doctor say he can get an instant heart attack. So me a make me mind strong for protect me family and let he na worry.”

Hemchand also joked about her birth name being “Baby.” She said she was teased constantly as a child because of her name and persons still find it funny that her correct name is Baby.

The mother of two young children also stated that she would love for a community centre and playground to be erected in the village.

Most villagers said their favourite thing to do was to go and hang out with their neighbours in the afternoon and catch up on the latest village gossip.

ABANDONED HOUSE

BABY HEMCHAND WITH HER HUSBAND AND THE YOUNGER OF HER TWO CHILDREN

THE BRIDGE THAT NEEDS REPAIRED

SHARMILA BRONNE'S SHOP

A VILLAGER FISHING IN THE SALT TRENCH

KISHAN FISHING IN THE SALT TRENCH

THE RESIDENT PROPERTY HAS A BRIDGE AND GATE NO FENCE

AN OLD FASHIONED IN THE VILLAGE

KENNARD

CHANDRAWATTIE PAUL AND HER NEW BORN

PRAM

VERONE PAUL

Original Post

Storm, that short distance has so many names. Seawell-Turn  is known for its many accidents.  The same with Bolum turn, at the other end of the long straight road. I believe this  is caused by cows crossing the road  with muddy feet and cars not slowing down, when it rains.

Once, just before I could caution a driver to slow down at muddy Bolum turn, he almost flipped the car, but safely landed in the nearby trench and a tractor had to be used to pull the car. Some Guyana drivers don't seem to notice dangers on the road, until after an accident.

I was told that an airplane  crashed behind the Fraser's house at #19 village during WWII [the  large lone house on the back-dam  side of the highway] and they built a wooden runway  for it to take off.  

In the 1960's my late sister was married to a man from #19 village whose daughter  was a teacher at the primary school. But that area  is changed so much with large houses, that  I am not able to find exactly where they lived.

My  teacher's wife from Albion was the headmistress for a number of years at that school : Bohemia ?

Chief is a proud past resident [PPR] of Coriverton and he might have to ask his way around metropolitan Albion, my sugar estate.  Dem country bai always get lost in populated areas like Albion, but me hear he was able to overcome NY.    

Tola posted:

Storm, that short distance has so many names. Seawell-Turn  is known for its many accidents.  The same with Bolum turn, at the other end of the long straight road. I believe this  is caused by cows crossing the road  with muddy feet and cars not slowing down, when it rains.

Once, just before I could caution a driver to slow down at muddy Bolum turn, he almost flipped the car, but safely landed in the nearby trench and a tractor had to be used to pull the car. Some Guyana drivers don't seem to notice dangers on the road, until after an accident.

I was told that an airplane  crashed behind the Fraser's house at #19 village during WWII [the  large lone house on the back-dam  side of the highway] and they built a wooden runway  for it to take off.  

In the 1960's my late sister was married to a man from #19 village whose daughter  was a teacher at the primary school. But that area  is changed so much with large houses, that  I am not able to find exactly where they lived.

My  teacher's wife from Albion was the headmistress for a number of years at that school : Bohemia ?

Chief is a proud past resident [PPR] of Coriverton and he might have to ask his way around metropolitan Albion, my sugar estate.  Dem country bai always get lost in populated areas like Albion, but me hear he was able to overcome NY.    

Tola bhai, Skeldon(Corriverton) was always a bright spot. Home is always where the heart is. Not sure about Skeldon these days..all the cinemas gone, more rum shops, drunks all over, pollution is an eye sore. The place stinks by the market. 

Django posted:

Source

Number 11 Village, Corentyne, Berbice is a small village with a population of just over 300 people. However, the village is popular for its large-scale fishing. While most residents earn their living from fishing and cattle rearing, others are attached to the sugar estates in the region or operate small businesses, like groceries and beer gardens.

This village is predominantly Indian and has no place of worship, no school, no community centre, police station, health centre or playfield.

An "assumed" PPP constituency!!  What does it matter to them whether the PPP or PNC rule?  I'm sure, in their eyes, the PNC cannot be less neglectful than "their" own PPP!  At least then they/us can cry "Afro-racism"!

Like some of the little settlements of people we discovered on the ECD in 2006/2007.  Priya and her social welfare office claimed no one existed there, phantom bodies and souls!  Babies born and never registered, youths never seen a school door!  Ok, my PNC hat today, breaking my stride!!

Jagan must be turning in his grave!!

Nehru posted:

Base, I agree with you BUT, those people need to get off their asses and raise their voices and DEMAND the necessary services. If not provided, refuse to pay any Taxes and create a self governed Village!!

I doubt the pay any direct taxes apart from VAT, so no leverage there.  I agree people should agitate from rights.  The sugar workers did this during the PPP era but they were organized.  I doubt they are organized and besides, who will push them [coolies] against the PPP.  And why do people have to protest to get basic schooling for their kids?

Banna, I don't care who get mad when i post, but the PPP has been an utter failure on some fronts, total disgrace when compared to the values and principles of the Jagans.  Over the years the PPP morphed into a small clique of self-centered high-and-mighty overlords consumed with wealth, power, their wardrobe and living large in general.

Guyana is a case study in Animal Farm mentality, both with the PPP and PNC!

Again, I agree. The PPP had 22 years to hep these people and others like them but they did not!!  Thy were caught up in the glitter and grand appetites.

But you will agree with me that the Nakmakaram Crabdaag and the PNC make the PPP loks like Mother Theresa.

Nehru posted:

Base, I agree with you BUT, those people need to get off their asses and raise their voices and DEMAND the necessary services. If not provided, refuse to pay any Taxes and create a self governed Village!!

Dude, those people except for two families do not own a pot to piss in except the tiny house lot they live on. Were it not for VAT these people would not know what is a tax. Most are fishermen and they hike some three miles to the sea reserve to fish. That salt trench fishing is also not the kind of fish anyone want to eat. It is a drainage canal and it absorbs the outflows of outhouses and runoffs from washing dishes and taking showers etc so no one usually fish there if they have good sense.

Tola posted:

Storm, that short distance has so many names. Seawell-Turn  is known for its many accidents.  The same with Bolum turn, at the other end of the long straight road. I believe this  is caused by cows crossing the road  with muddy feet and cars not slowing down, when it rains.

Once, just before I could caution a driver to slow down at muddy Bolum turn, he almost flipped the car, but safely landed in the nearby trench and a tractor had to be used to pull the car. Some Guyana drivers don't seem to notice dangers on the road, until after an accident.

I was told that an airplane  crashed behind the Fraser's house at #19 village during WWII [the  large lone house on the back-dam  side of the highway] and they built a wooden runway  for it to take off.  

In the 1960's my late sister was married to a man from #19 village whose daughter  was a teacher at the primary school. But that area  is changed so much with large houses, that  I am not able to find exactly where they lived.

My  teacher's wife from Albion was the headmistress for a number of years at that school : Bohemia ?

Chief is a proud past resident [PPR] of Coriverton and he might have to ask his way around metropolitan Albion, my sugar estate.  Dem country bai always get lost in populated areas like Albion, but me hear he was able to overcome NY.    

When I was nine or ten I used to ride to the community center, the old one not the new stadium and listen to V and the crocodiles practice. We had no one to teach guitar so one learned from copying by watching the hand movements or by ear. I used to do the same thing in GT. I used to watch the night people and sammy backh practice and when I became older actually went to their gigs.

Nehru posted:

Again, I agree. The PPP had 22 years to hep these people and others like them but they did not!!  Thy were caught up in the glitter and grand appetites.

But you will agree with me that the Nakmakaram Crabdaag and the PNC make the PPP loks like Mother Theresa.

PNC will [again] destroy the economy, so they will be unable to do what the PPP never [willingly] did.

And the saga of Guyana continues, regardless which [political] hat one chooses to wear!  Sheer "P"unishment for "N"egroes and "C"oolies!!

skeldon_man posted:
Tola posted:

Chief is a proud past resident [PPR] of Coriverton and he might have to ask his way around metropolitan Albion, my sugar estate.  Dem country bai always get lost in populated areas like Albion, but me hear he was able to overcome NY.    

Tola bhai, Skeldon(Corriverton) was always a bright spot. Home is always where the heart is. Not sure about Skeldon these days..all the cinemas gone, more rum shops, drunks all over, pollution is an eye sore. The place stinks by the market. 

Skelly, your description of Skeldon is no different from Albion.

Behind our house at Belvedere  was a water pump, that was blown up in the 1960s. It was repaired, but the trench is so full of garbage and grass that no path exist for the water when it rains.

Unfortunately, the people don't see the relationship between their crops and poultry dying, with the garbage they throw in the trenches.

The personal value system in Guyana has gone haywire and the new generation learn all the bad habits from the adults. How it will end, is anyone guess. And this government don't have any interest in Berbice.

One of the young women in our youth groups in GY is married with a daughter.  During a recent visit, I was horrified to see the girl with all rotten teeth. I lost a few teeth from eating sugar cane by not brushing before bed, so our children  was gong-ho in taking care of their teeth. But this girl seems to lack parental guidance.

We did  a lot of work with youth programs at UG Berbice. Some of these educated guys would leave for lunch at 1:00 pm most days and at midnight they are still drinking. It was difficult to see how they stay focused on their work.

There don't seem to be any  program to help people with social issues and the family or business suffer the consequences.

Tola,

To me that entire stretch is known as No 19 and we used to say or it is the longest straigh road in the Carribean.

SKELDON_MAN do not loose faith ,  Skeldon is on the rebound. Under the Ppp the entire country was under tubbish, not only our beloped birthplace. Things are improving under this new Gov't in regards to cleanliness.

Chief posted:

Tola,

To me that entire stretch is known as No 19 and we used to say or it is the longest straigh road in the Carribean.

SKELDON_MAN do not loose faith ,  Skeldon is on the rebound. Under the Ppp the entire country was under tubbish, not only our beloped birthplace. Things are improving under this new Gov't in regards to cleanliness.

Skeldon is on the rebound??? Be serious Chief. The worst thing for Skeldon is the closing of the sugar factory. Skeldon will be a ghost town if this happens. The sideline between the market and Anglican School is a cesspit. I am not sure how the vendors(the responsible parties) can sit there and inhale that stench. I looked around and see garbage(maggots crawling on the surface) at each street corner. PNC ain't got no time for region 6. It's PPP stronghold.

Chief posted:

Tola,

To me that entire stretch is known as No 19 and we used to say or it is the longest straigh road in the Carribean.

SKELDON_MAN do not loose faith ,  Skeldon is on the rebound. Under the Ppp the entire country was under tubbish, not only our beloped birthplace. Things are improving under this new Gov't in regards to cleanliness.

Chief, one of my favourite scenes in the area close to Bolum is the single house on the sea side, surrounded by the fish pond water. Its also a good place to watch sunsets.

Before the big house was built, they had a small shack, that made for a nice photo  surrounded by water.

I also knew the entire area as #19 village, but discovered  other names after the toll booth and police outpost were installed, near the school.

The toll booth were definitely a racist thing.  Only in Indian areas. I believe another was at Upper Corentyne.  

Tola posted:
Chief posted:

Tola,

To me that entire stretch is known as No 19 and we used to say or it is the longest straigh road in the Carribean.

SKELDON_MAN do not loose faith ,  Skeldon is on the rebound. Under the Ppp the entire country was under tubbish, not only our beloped birthplace. Things are improving under this new Gov't in regards to cleanliness.

Chief, one of my favourite scenes in the area close to Bolum is the single house on the sea side, surrounded by the fish pond water. Its also a good place to watch sunsets.

Before the big house was built, they had a small shack, that made for a nice photo  surrounded by water.

I also knew the entire area as #19 village, but discovered  other names after the toll booth and police outpost were installed, near the school.

The toll booth were definitely a racist thing.  Only in Indian areas. I believe another was at Upper Corentyne.  

#63 village. Two police officers were stationed there 24/7.

skeldon_man posted:
Tola posted:
Chief posted:

Tola,

I also knew the entire area as #19 village, but discovered  other names after the toll booth and police outpost were installed, near the school.

The toll booth were definitely a racist thing.  Only in Indian areas. I believe another was at Upper Corentyne.  

#63 village. Two police officers were stationed there 24/7.

Skelly, I don't believe toll booth existed  in any other parts of Guyana.

I suspect the police outpost  was installed near Bohemia? school, because of the toll booth.

The toll booth attendants were crooked like hell. After paying, they would give a piece of blank paper as receipt.  If you question it, the police hassle the car driver with info  and fitness for the car. You pay, grin and bare and the attendants laugh all the way to their bank.

I am still pissed that my Dad, in his senior years, could not buy sugar at Albion, where he help to make sugar.

Tola posted:
skeldon_man posted:
Tola posted:
Chief posted:

Tola,

I also knew the entire area as #19 village, but discovered  other names after the toll booth and police outpost were installed, near the school.

The toll booth were definitely a racist thing.  Only in Indian areas. I believe another was at Upper Corentyne.  

#63 village. Two police officers were stationed there 24/7.

Skelly, I don't believe toll booth existed  in any other parts of Guyana.

I suspect the police outpost  was installed near Bohemia? school, because of the toll booth.

The toll booth attendants were crooked like hell. After paying, they would give a piece of blank paper as receipt.  If you question it, the police hassle the car driver with info  and fitness for the car. You pay, grin and bare and the attendants laugh all the way to their bank.

I am still pissed that my Dad, in his senior years, could not buy sugar at Albion, where he help to make sugar.

The Linden highway also had tolls.

 

Tola posted:
skeldon_man posted:
Tola posted:
Chief posted:

Tola,

I also knew the entire area as #19 village, but discovered  other names after the toll booth and police outpost were installed, near the school.

The toll booth were definitely a racist thing.  Only in Indian areas. I believe another was at Upper Corentyne.  

#63 village. Two police officers were stationed there 24/7.

Skelly, I don't believe toll booth existed  in any other parts of Guyana.

I suspect the police outpost  was installed near Bohemia? school, because of the toll booth.

The toll booth attendants were crooked like hell. After paying, they would give a piece of blank paper as receipt.  If you question it, the police hassle the car driver with info  and fitness for the car. You pay, grin and bare and the attendants laugh all the way to their bank.

I am still pissed that my Dad, in his senior years, could not buy sugar at Albion, where he help to make sugar.

Police outpost was across the salt trench  on Jacob Hanoman's land. just below number 11. That is some ways from the school.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×
×