Not a Sermon only a Thought

God Honors Our Commitment to Him

Daniel 1:1-21

Daniel and his friends faced the same dilemma that we do today—how to live a holy life. At times, our society seems to accept Christian values and standards, but that’s not always the case. Our challenge is to live under God’s authority while remaining in submission to the law of the land. But what if we are forced to choose between the two? Our first inclination should be to seek the Lord’s guidance before marching forward.

Had Daniel bluntly declared, “I won’t eat this food!” he wouldn’t have lasted long, and we wouldn’t have the book of Daniel in the Bible. But the Lord gave him the wisdom to humbly seek permission from the person who was in a position of authority over him. God honored the young man’s commitment and provided a way for him to live righteously in a pagan world.

We tend to hold up Daniel and his three friends as extraordinary people who lived amazing lives. But they were regular people, just like us. Have you ever wondered what the Lord could do in the life of an ordinary person like you or me? The determining factor is not the individual’s greatness, but rather his or her commitment to a heavenly Father who can do remarkable things in a life fully devoted to Him. That’s the kind of person God is looking for.

Although we don’t know all that God could do in and through us if we radically committed ourselves to Him, the thought of missing out on His plans should be enough to motivate us to obey. On arriving in heaven, we don’t want to discover blessings were forfeited because we weren’t fully devoted to Him.

Hey brother Keith, does Gentle Jesus have any role in these hurricanes and earthquakes that are affecting us the past few weeks? Is that some of the evidence of his unconditional love? Between his unconditional love and his power, what is stopping him from killing the storms? Why does he prefer to allow the storm to kill people?

Freedom From Enslavement

Colossians 3:5-10

Sin cannot dominate believers who throw themselves upon the Lord’s mercy—the Father is faithful to restore fellowship with His beloved children. He does this by breaking down walls that were built up through disobedience.

However, it is our job to confess the specific bondage that holds us, since denial blocks the healing and freedom God offers. Whatever the nature of our sin, the root of the problem is ultimately spiritual, not simply a weakness or social ill. Treatment meant to ease our emotional, mental, or physical discomfort will not be fully effective until we acknowledge the spiritual aspect of our difficulty.

Though sin is uniquely spiritual in nature, the reasons behind wrong behavior are often emotional. Emotions trapped deep within the believer—like insecurity, inadequacy, or lack of self-worth—drive the individual to search out ways to satisfy or escape the feelings. What results is often some form of unhealthy behavior. For instance, at one time in my own ministry experience, I allowed myself to be overextended. Out of a sense of inadequacy, I was driving myself to succeed in “God’s work,” which turned out to be the responsibilities He gave me plus anything else I thought needed doing for Him. I discovered that freedom from bondage is a choice.

As Paul explains, Jesus’ followers must lay aside their sin. For me, that meant putting away my misguided drive to succeed and taking a long rest. Through the Holy Spirit, we voluntarily surrender our chains in order to gain freedom in Christ.

Love how the good brother Keith is so absorbed in his own preaching shit that he couldn't even realize that some of us have just been through a very devastating few days with hurricanes and fires. These are the opportunities when we are able to separate the blind preachers from the people with humanity. Not even a word of well wished, hope or encouragement. Love it when fraudsters can be exposed.

Keep on preaching brother. 

Confidence in Prayer

1 John 5:14-15

Throughout the Scriptures, we are encouraged to pray. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus tells His disciples to keep asking, seeking, and knocking while trusting the heavenly Father to give what is good to His children (Matt. 7:7-11). And in Philippians 4:6, Paul urges us to respond to anxiety by praying about everything. Therefore, it’s obvious that God wants us to come to Him with all our needs and concerns.

Today’s passage assures us that the Lord hears and answers our prayers. However, this promise is accompanied by one very important stipulation: We must ask according to His will. But how can we know whether our request is what He desires? Much of God’s will is clearly revealed in Scripture, but what are we to do when an issue is not directly addressed in the Bible?

Though we’d like to feel confident that the Lord will hear and answer, at times our prayers seem like shots in the dark because we have no idea whether they align with His will. If we dare to admit it, there are also times when we just want God to do what we ask, without regard to what He desires.  

If we want to pray effectively, our goal should not be to offer up quick, thoughtless, or self-willed prayers in hopes of receiving speedy answers. Instead, we must learn to pray wisely and wait patiently. Along with voicing our concerns and requests to God, we should also offer ourselves up in submission to our Father, as Jesus did in Gethsemane (Matt. 26:39). When we are yielded and obedient to the Lord, His Spirit guides us and provides the wisdom we need in order to pray according to His will.

Satan’s Strategy

Luke 22:31-34, Luke 22:54-62

Every one of us makes tracks through the valley of failure. The question is, How are you going to respond? Plenty of people give up and exchange a vibrant kingdom-serving life for a defeated existence. But failure need not be the end of the story. It’s a chance for a new beginning, living in Christ’s strength.

Peter had a life-altering failure. Jesus warned that Satan had asked permission to “sift” the disciple like wheat (Luke 22:31), referring to the vigorous shaking required to separate wheat kernels from debris. The enemy wanted to shake Peter’s faith hard in hopes that he’d fall away from Jesus like chaff.

Peter believed the promise he’d made to Jesus: “Even though all may fall away, yet I will not” (Mark 14:29). But Satan knows a few things about the power of failure. He realized that the disciple would be wounded by his own disloyalty. A man with tattered pride can’t help but question his usefulness.

When Satan sifts believers, his goal is to damage our faith so much that we’re useless to the Lord. He wants us shelved far from the action of God’s kingdom. Therefore, he goes for our strengths—the areas where we believe ourselves to be invincible, or at least very well protected. And when the devil succeeds, we are disappointed and demoralized. But we don’t have to stay that way.

If we are willing, God can use our failure to do spiritual housecleaning. Peter laid down his pride and instead put on the Holy Spirit’s courage. Thereafter, he risked humiliation, persecution, and death to proclaim the gospel. Failure was the catalyst that led to greater faith and true servanthood.

This is how mixed up the world is we want God to be, "ALL LOVE" with no condemnation, no judgement. We don't want to hear about the CONSEQUENCES, we want to hear about pleasure, about God goodness but don't speak about any consequences of ungodly living because it makes us uncomfortable and we certainly don't want to hear about it. The deception is that people get along so well they don't think it's true.

This is how mixed up the Christian preacher is. He wants to talks about God's unconditional love but still is confused about whether God has unconditional love or whether God is not "ALL LOVE".

"CONSEQUENCES" are akin to buts. There is no place for buts where there is unconditional love.

The preacher is a used car salesman like Trump is.

The Blessings of a Spirit-Filled Life

1 John 2:3-6

There was a time when I was so disheartened that I wondered whether I should remain in the ministry. How could I tell people that Jesus would give them peace and joy while I felt discouraged by my own failure to be godly? I understood what “fruit of the Spirit” (Gal. 5:22-23) meant but was never sure which of those qualities, if any, would be apparent in me from day to day.

God let me stew in my anxiety until I was fully committed to finding out if His Word was true or not. I encountered my answer in a biography of Hudson Taylor, the founder of China Inland Missions. For a long time he, too, felt that his efforts fell short of the Lord’s expectations. But Taylor came to realize that God wanted believers to trust Him fully and rest on His promises. So when Jesus Christ said to abide in Him, He meant that His followers were to stop striving and struggling. Instead they were to trust Him to subdue their flesh.

As a child, I’d been taught that a person got saved and then went to work for God. You did the best you could to act in a godly manner, think right, and speak wisely. When your best wasn’t good enough, well, you tried harder. Such an impossible expectation was wearing me out, and now the idea of letting Jesus Christ work through me sounded both biblical and liberating.

A branch doesn’t bear grapes because of its determined efforts to get sunshine; rather, it simply abides in the vine, and fruit appears. The vine does all the work. In the same way, believers are to abide in the Savior so that spiritual fruit can grow in their life.

The Book of Books

Isaiah 55:9-11

Step into almost any bookstore, and you will find volumes covering every topic imaginable. Want new direction for your life? Self-help sections are extremely popular and accessible. Are your children disobeying? Parenting literature abounds. But do all of these “expert” authors have trustworthy credentials?

There is a place to find guidance and information that won’t ever mislead: The Bible will bless and benefit everyone who reads and applies its wisdom. Here’s what the Author—“the God of truth” (Isa. 65:16)—says about His own Word:

1. The Bible gives direction for life (Psalm 119:105). God uses His Word to lead us, no matter what our circumstances may be. The Holy Spirit can take even simple verses, which seem general at first glance, and apply them to our specific situation.

2. Scripture strengthens us when we grieve or face difficulty (Psalm 119:28, Psalm 119:116). By spending time processing what God says, we’re reminded that He loves us, cares about our situation, and can handle whatever we’re facing. Worry and pain turn into peace, hope, and joyful confidence.

3. God’s Word helps us understand our inner motivations (Heb. 4:12). Scripture acts like a mirror that lets us see ourselves as we truly are.

The Bible is the very mind of God put into words so that man can know his Maker more fully. In deepening our understanding of the heavenly Father, we learn how to live successfully and die unafraid. To what extent do you depend upon this amazing Book as your foundation for life?

How to Handle the Bible

Psalm 1:1-3

The value we place on something determines how we treat it. For instance, you probably wouldn’t give much thought to caring for an old shoebox. Yet if someone placed $10,000 inside before handing you that same cardboard container, you’d likely rearrange your day to protect it against damage or theft.

Once we realize the worth of Scripture, we no longer read merely out of obligation. Instead, we hunger for its revelation and life-changing power.

Here’s how you can prioritize God’s Word so that it impacts your heart and behavior. First, turn to it daily with eager expectation for what the Lord will reveal. Second, meditate upon the Word by thinking about what you’ve read and absorbing its meaning and implications. Third, study God’s truth. There are a variety of ways to do this. For example, follow a specific word through the Old and New Testaments by using a concordance or search engine. Or study an entire book by dissecting one chapter at a time. Fourth, believe what the Lord says. Fifth, obey. In other words, take what you read and apply it to your life circumstances. This often requires courage and discipline. Sixth, share what you’ve learned. Doing so will encourage others while strengthening you and sinking the lesson deep in your heart.

The Bible may look like just another book. But it is living truth that can protect and guide, pierce and encourage. It holds the story of Christ’s sacrifice and our salvation, so we can eventually dwell with the Lord in heaven. The way that we look to and depend on God’s Word will reflect to others the value we place on it.

The Witness of Suffering

1 Peter 3:13-18

We’d all like to be witnesses for Christ. If we faithfully display His righteousness, love, patience, and joy in our interactions with others, it’s logical to think they’ll be drawn to Jesus. Yet while that’s true for some, many have an opposite reaction.

Jesus called believers the light of the world and said we’re to let our light shine so men will see our good deeds and glorify God (Matt. 5:14-16). But He also said, “All who do evil hate the light” because it exposes their sin (John 3:20 NLT). Then Jesus warned that if men persecuted Him, they would also persecute His disciples (John 15:20).

History has proven Christ’s words to be true. He was hated and crucified, all His disciples except John were martyred, and throughout history Christians have been persecuted in numerous places around the globe. Yet despite all this, the church still marches forward, and people continue to be saved.

While the righteous conduct of the saints and the preaching of the gospel may not always win the lost, many have been converted by watching how Christians suffered. Foxe’s Book of Martyrs describes believers voluntarily laying down their life—even singing, praying, and praising God as they faced excruciating deaths. In parts of the world today, believers are still being faithful witnesses for Christ with their response to persecution and suffering.

Although most of us are not facing intense hatred, our lives may be an irritation to those living in darkness. When we face slander, mocking, or mistreatment because of our faith, let’s remember that a godly response may be our most effective witness.

Prashad posted:

Brother Keith go get a real job. The koolies works for their money and so should you.

The man began by stating that he is not offering a sermon but spent months doing just that. Looks like honesty is not big on bro. Keith list.

God’s Sovereignty and the Existence of Evil

Genesis 2:7-25, Genesis 3

Throughout the Bible, we see evidence of God’s authority over both humanity and nature. However, many of us have trouble reconciling God’s sovereign control with the existence of evil. Let’s look at what Scripture tells us.

In the beginning, God created a perfect world, after which He declared that all He had made was good (Gen. 1:31). Wickedness was not part of what He’d fashioned. In the heavens, however, an angel known as Satan sought to elevate himself above God and was cast down to earth (Isa. 14:12-14).

God created Adam and Eve in His image. They were made with the capacity to love their Creator and the ability to choose to obey or disobey Him. God had no desire for Adam and Eve to sin (James 1:13), but He allowed their will to be tested. We know the rest of the story. When they disobeyed God, sin entered our world and corrupted mankind. As Adam and Eve’s descendants, we inherited a sinful nature (Rom. 5:12).

The Lord’s permissive will allowed events to unfold as they have. God did not create evil, but He has permitted it to exist and uses it to accomplish His good purposes (Isa. 45:6-7).

When you have questions or doubts about the Lord’s sovereignty, start with what you do understand, study what God has revealed about Himself and His ways, and ask the Holy Spirit to help you believe. A few answers to your questions will come quickly, while some will require diligent study and spiritual maturity. As for the answers to other questions, which God has chosen to keep hidden, we are to walk by faith (Deut. 29:29).

God’s Response to Sinful Behavior

Genesis 20:1-16

Despite appearances, evil men are not in control of our world; God is. How does our sovereign Lord respond to sin?

At times He allows sin to run its full course. After the exodus, He promised Israel abundant blessings if they were obedient (Psalm 81:10). When they persistently disobeyed, He “gave them over to the stubbornness of their heart” (Psalm 81:12). God remained in control but chose to let the nation experience the consequences of continued rebellion. He deals with individuals the same way (Rom. 1:24, Rom. 1:28). Apart from Jesus Christ, the end result of sin is eternal death (Rom. 3:23).

At other times, God stops the sinful behavior completely. When Abraham lied about Sarah being his wife, the king of Gerar brought her into his household for himself. Abraham’s lie—“she is my sister”—put the king at risk. God intervened and prevented any further sinful action from taking place. For believers, God limits the intensity, scope, and time we have to deal with a particular temptation (1 Corinthians 10:13). For those who have rejected Jesus Christ, there is no such promise.

To believe the heavenly Father is sovereign, we must embrace certain truths: His thoughts and ways are superior to ours (Isa. 55:8-9); He always keeps His promises (2 Corinthians 1:20); His perfect character is unchanging (James 1:17); and He has control over everything, including times of blessing and disaster (Isa. 45:7).

The next time you are confronted with the effects of sin, remember these important truths, and look to God with trusting faith.

ksazma posted:

There are kids buried under concrete rubble in Mexico. All due to an act of God. How does that match up with this "unconditionally loving God" nonsense?

Due to your ignorance, I will response to your questions on this issue. We all notice that tragedies cause many people to question God’s goodness as we can see from your post above. It is distressing that natural disasters are often termed "acts of God" as you put it, while no credit is given to God for years, decades, or even centuries of peaceful weather. God created the whole universe and the laws of nature, read Genesis 1:1 for reference. Most natural disasters are a result of these laws at work. Hurricanes, typhoons, and tornados are the results of divergent weather patterns colliding. Earthquakes are the result of the earth's plate structure shifting. A tsunami is caused by an underwater earthquake.

The Bible proclaims in Colossians 1:16-17 that Jesus Christ holds all of nature together. Could God prevent natural disasters? Absolutely! Does God sometimes influence the weather? Yes, as we see in Deuteronomy 11:17 and James 5:17. Numbers 16:30-34 shows us that God sometimes causes natural disasters as a judgment against sin. The book of Revelation describes many events which could definitely be described as natural disasters in Revelation chapters 6, 8, and 16. Is every natural disaster a punishment from God? Absolutely not.

In much the same way that God allows (allow! NOT influence) evil people to commit evil acts, God allows the earth to reflect the consequences sin has had on creation. Romans 8:19-21 tells us, "The creation waits in eager expectation for the sons of God to be revealed. For the creation was subjected to frustration, not by its own choice, but by the will of the one who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to decay and brought into the glorious freedom of the children of God." The fall of humanity into sin had effects on everything, including the world we inhabit. Everything in creation is subject to frustration and decay. Sin is the ultimate cause of natural disasters just as it is the cause of death, disease, and suffering.

We can understand why natural disasters occur. What we do not understand is why God allows them to occur. Why did God allow the tsunami to kill over 225,000 people in Asia? Why did God allow Hurricane Irma to destroy the homes of thousands across the Caribbean? For one thing, such events shake our confidence in this life and force us to think about eternity. Churches are usually filled after disasters as people realize how tenuous their lives really are and how life can be taken away in an instant. What we do know is this, God is good! Many amazing miracles occurred during the course of natural disasters that prevented even greater loss of life. Natural disasters cause millions of people to reevaluate their priorities in life. Hundreds of millions of dollars in aid is sent to help the people who are suffering. Christian ministries have the opportunity to help, minister, counsel, pray, and lead people to saving faith in Christ! God can, and does, bring great good out of terrible tragedies (Romans 8:28).

Now explain to us does the God you serve has unconditional love? Why/why not? What is the Muslim community doing concerning all these natural disasters that's going on around us? Next time you get that urge of making spectacle of yourself and displaying ignorance think twice.

Love how the good brother Keith finds it necessary to prelude what he writes with "due to your ignorance". Seems like a very Christian thing to do.

Now explain what those kids did to your God that he feels the drunken desire to hurt them. Guess that is what an unconditionally loving father would do.

ksazma posted:

So god's way of getting people into churches is to f uck with little children lives. Sounds like what an unconditionally loving father would do.

Here is my take on all this. I am muslim. When my father passed away after 4 months in the hospital I had a lot of questions and a lot more anger. A very good family friend and distant relative sat down with me and told me that muslims believe that when someone suffers on Earth, they are basically paying for their sins here and not later in the afterlife. I don't know if the same applies here and if so what sins those children could have committed to have paid the ultimate price.

GTAngler posted:
ksazma posted:

So god's way of getting people into churches is to f uck with little children lives. Sounds like what an unconditionally loving father would do.

Here is my take on all this. I am muslim. When my father passed away after 4 months in the hospital I had a lot of questions and a lot more anger. A very good family friend and distant relative sat down with me and told me that muslims believe that when someone suffers on Earth, they are basically paying for their sins here and not later in the afterlife. I don't know if the same applies here and if so what sins those children could have committed to have paid the ultimate price.

GT, as a Muslim you know that everyone is born sinless so it is difficult to think that these kids are paying for their sins.

That said, it is a bigger problem for folks like Bro Keith who seeks to trick people into buying the nonsense of an unconditionally loving father when all the evidence is of a vengeful god. Folks like him are like used cars salesmen.

Keith posted:

 

We can understand why natural disasters occur. What we do not understand is why God allows them to occur. Why did God allow the tsunami to kill over 225,000 people in Asia? Why did God allow Hurricane Irma to destroy the homes of thousands across the Caribbean? For one thing, such events shake our confidence in this life and force us to think about eternity. Churches are usually filled after disasters as people realize how tenuous their lives really are and how life can be taken away in an instant. What we do know is this, God is good! Many amazing miracles occurred during the course of natural disasters that prevented even greater loss of life. Natural disasters cause millions of people to reevaluate their priorities in life. Hundreds of millions of dollars in aid is sent to help the people who are suffering. Christian ministries have the opportunity to help, minister, counsel, pray, and lead people to saving faith in Christ! 

So the Christian preachers are having massive orgasms over these tragedies. They get the opportunity to entrap vulnerable people recovering from the tragedies. Just like predators who entrap vulnerable women after a breakup.

GTAngler posted:

Here is my take on all this. I am muslim. When my father passed away after 4 months in the hospital I had a lot of questions and a lot more anger. A very good family friend and distant relative sat down with me and told me that muslims believe that when someone suffers on Earth, they are basically paying for their sins here and not later in the afterlife. I don't know if the same applies here and if so what sins those children could have committed to have paid the ultimate price.

GTAngler, First my condolences to you and your family on the lost your dad. I pray that God will continue to comfort your family and draw everyone much more closer in love and unity. 

A bit about myself, I'm a Christian, I'm NOT a religious leader nor am I a bible scholar. I attend church listening to the sermon(s) being preach, I study God's word and apply it (I try to) in my life. Therefore I am just a church goer per say. I study God word for my own benefit so that likes of our friend ksazma or Christian preacher themselves would not bring forth any foreign doctrine to me; I also do this for correctness. I do have a career 9-5 job M-F.

I have took the liberty of highlighting a few lines from your statement above because I want to address those. Your family friend is right, "when someone suffers on Earth, they are basically paying for their sins" or sin from pass generations. There is a saying that goes, "We reap what we sow, more than we sow, and later than we sow". The effects of sin are naturally passed down from one generation to the next. When a father has a sinful lifestyle, his children are likely to practice the same sinful lifestyle. The children will choose to repeat the sins of their fathers and that develops into a generational curse.

The cure for a generational curse has always been repentance. When Israel turned from idols to serve the living God, the "curse" was broken and God saved them according to Judges 3:9, 15; 1 Samuel 12:10-11. Yes, God promised to visit Israel’s sin upon the third and fourth generations, but in the very next verse He promised that He would show "love to a thousand generations of those who love me and keep my commandments", Exodus 20:6. In other words, God’s grace lasts a thousand times longer than His wrath.

After you have departed this earth will come your judgement to determine where you would spend your afterlife, in heaven or hell. We all have to face the judgement and give an account of the life we live here on this earth.

Being born sinners results in the fact that we all sin. Notice the progression in Romans 5:12, sin entered the world through Adam, death follows sin, death comes to all people, all people sin because they inherit sin from Adam. Because "all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God", Romans 3:23, we need a perfect, sinless sacrifice to wash away our sin, something we are powerless to do on our own.

Now if we both were born sinless then there is no need for us to die because as stated in the above paragraph, because of SIN comes DEATH. So I've to ask, why is there death if there is no sin? Please don't answer it's a rhetorical question.

"For just as through the disobedience of the one man the many were made sinners, so also through the obedience of the one man the many will be made righteous." God is just in applying Adam’s sin to the entire human race, and He is just in applying Jesus Christ’s death to all who will receive Him by faith.

So in a nutshell we the children could be suffering due to the life our grandparents and their parents and even the parents before lived. How do we break this cycle? By repentance and training up a child to admonition God so that the generations to come will seek God and walk according to His will.

Keith posted:

 

I study God word for my own benefit so that likes of our friend ksazma or Christian preacher themselves would not bring forth any foreign doctrine to me; I also do this for correctness. I do have a career 9-5 job M-F..

Still being dishonest. If you study God's word for your own benefit, why are you posting them here? Is posting them here how they benefit you? Why do you feel the need to bring foreign doctrines to other s when you have already decided that no one would bring any foreign doctrine to you? Why seek to impose your endless sermons on others?

Oh and by the way, death is not the result of sin. That is a Biblical mistake. You thump your chest and claim that Jesus died. Yet you insist that he was sinless. Go figure your confusion. Anything that experiences birth will experience death. That is the natural process of things. Even plants and animals die. What sins do they commit?

Perhaps you need to expand your reading since your view of the world is extremely limited.

cain posted:

So because a parent or grand parent commits a sin, God, in all his wisdom places the blame at the child's feet. Not my type of God, my God wouldn't be that much a moron. 

Exactly. And the good brother likes to refer to that God as the unconditionally loving father.

We read in the Bible that God promises to punish a person for their sins up to their fourth generation. That is almost a whole 100 years that that unconditionally loving father holds a grudge for a single infraction.

Two of Noah's sons laughed at Noah because he was drunk and naked. So who did God put the sin on? The grandson of the son who did not laugh and who actually covered his naked father. That is one strange unconditionally loving (but weird) father.

The Source of Guilt

2 Corinthians 7:9-10

I once read a survey that asked 500 people what emotions they felt when experiencing guilt. The answers were heartbreaking. Respondents reported feeling punished, depressed, worthless, rejected, and isolated. Many were overwhelmed by a general sense of low self-esteem. There was no joy, no hope, and no vitality. In a sense, it was as though the feelings of guilt had completely blotted out everything else in their life.

This seems like such a sad way to exist, and yet it’s safe to assume that we all—even those of us who are believers—have experienced these exact same emotions. In fact, you may be dealing with intense guilt right now. If so, let’s consider one simple question: Where does it come from?

In 2 Corinthians 7:10, we see two forms of guilt. One is a sorrow that comes from God. This call to repentance is a tool the Lord uses to draw unbelievers to Himself through salvation in Christ. It also motivates believers to confess any wrongs causing “interference” in their fellowship with Him.

A second form of guilt is the dark emotion that plagues people with remorse and the reactions mentioned on the survey. Such sorrow isn’t from God at all, but from the world.

If you’ve received Jesus’ free gift of salvation but still struggle under the assault of guilt, let Scripture assure you: These feelings didn’t come from God. He is not attacking you. Rather, He holds the keys to your freedom. Don’t fall victim to the enemy’s lies. In Christ, you are forgiven and free. Lay down your chains today.

cain posted:

So because a parent or grand parent commits a sin, God, in all his wisdom places the blame at the child's feet. Not my type of God, my God wouldn't be that much a moron. 

You clearly misunderstood the point.

"When a father(or PARENTS for that matter) has a sinful lifestyle, his children are likely to practice the same sinful lifestyle. The children will choose to repeat the sins of their fathers and that develops into a generational curse."

An example of what I mention above would be Jonathan Edwards, the Puritan Preacher from the 1700s. Jonathan and his wife Sarah left a great godly legacy for his 11 children.

At the turn of the 20th century, American educator and pastor A.E. Winship decided to trace out the descendants of Jonathan Edwards almost 150 years after his death.  His findings are astounding, especially when compared to a man known as Max Jukes. Jukes’ legacy came to the forefront when the family trees of 42 different men in the New York prison system traced back to him.

Jonathan Edwards’ godly legacy includes: 1 U.S. Vice-President, 3 U.S. Senators, 3 governors, 3 mayors, 13 college presidents, 30 judges, 65 professors, 80 public office holders, 100 lawyers and 100 missionaries.

Max Jukes’ descendants included: 7 murderers, 60 thieves, 50 women of debauchery, 130 other convicts. 310 paupers (with over 2,300 years lived in poorhouses) 400 who were physically wrecked by indulgent living.

It was estimated that Max Juke’s descendants cost the state more than $1,250,000.

Sources:
https://thinkgospel.wordpress....st-in-family-legacy/
http://archive.org/stream/juke...ds15623gut/15623.txt
http://www.rfrick.info/jukes.htm

ksazma posted:

Based on bro Keith's logic, if you are a baker, all your descendants will be bakers. How does that work out for y'all? Religion is how you control stupid people.

We already know how shallow you are when it comes to comprehending what's being discuss. You love evading questions and comes up with precipitous ignorance. Quit making a spectacle of yourself.

ksazma posted:

Based on bro Keith's logic, if you are a baker, all your descendants will be bakers. How does that work out for y'all? Religion is how you control stupid people.

To entertain your foolishness here lets see what a baker descendants might look like for generation to come.

Baker start selling from within his/her home, then spawn other family Bakers who now own their own shops, then their descendants open their own brand name shop(s) (entrepreneurship), now there is a family franchise, the baker descendants sits on the board as board member of the baker company and also has descendent who's a CEO of the company. Impressive. ;)

Keith posted:
ksazma posted:

Based on bro Keith's logic, if you are a baker, all your descendants will be bakers. How does that work out for y'all? Religion is how you control stupid people.

To entertain your foolishness here lets see what a baker descendants might look like for generation to come.

Baker start selling from within his/her home, then spawn other family Bakers who now own their own shops, then their descendants open their own brand name shop(s) (entrepreneurship), now there is a family franchise, the baker descendants sits on the board as board member of the baker company and also has descendent who's a CEO of the company. Impressive. ;)

Only in your narrow mind dude. There are farmers whose children are doctors. Secondly, a baker who start selling baked products from his/her home will not spawn others to also sell baked products. That will only result in too much baked products in that neighborhood and no other types of goods or services. Terrible formula that only a Christian preacher can concoct.

Keith posted:
ksazma posted:

Based on bro Keith's logic, if you are a baker, all your descendants will be bakers. How does that work out for y'all? Religion is how you control stupid people.

We already know how shallow you are when it comes to comprehending what's being discuss. You love evading questions and comes up with precipitous ignorance. Quit making a spectacle of yourself.

You sound like Trump. Who is this "we" and how do this "we already know"? My only objective is to consolidate that from your very first utterance, you chose to deceive. You don't discuss anything here dude. All you do is post sermons. On a topic where you initially declared that you will not post sermons.

Keith posted:
cain posted:

So because a parent or grand parent commits a sin, God, in all his wisdom places the blame at the child's feet. Not my type of God, my God wouldn't be that much a moron. 

You clearly misunderstood the point.

"When a father(or PARENTS for that matter) has a sinful lifestyle, his children are likely to practice the same sinful lifestyle. The children will choose to repeat the sins of their fathers and that develops into a generational curse."

An example of what I mention above would be Jonathan Edwards, the Puritan Preacher from the 1700s. Jonathan and his wife Sarah left a great godly legacy for his 11 children.

At the turn of the 20th century, American educator and pastor A.E. Winship decided to trace out the descendants of Jonathan Edwards almost 150 years after his death.  His findings are astounding, especially when compared to a man known as Max Jukes. Jukes’ legacy came to the forefront when the family trees of 42 different men in the New York prison system traced back to him.

Jonathan Edwards’ godly legacy includes: 1 U.S. Vice-President, 3 U.S. Senators, 3 governors, 3 mayors, 13 college presidents, 30 judges, 65 professors, 80 public office holders, 100 lawyers and 100 missionaries.

Max Jukes’ descendants included: 7 murderers, 60 thieves, 50 women of debauchery, 130 other convicts. 310 paupers (with over 2,300 years lived in poorhouses) 400 who were physically wrecked by indulgent living.

It was estimated that Max Juke’s descendants cost the state more than $1,250,000.

Sources:
https://thinkgospel.wordpress....st-in-family-legacy/
http://archive.org/stream/juke...ds15623gut/15623.txt
http://www.rfrick.info/jukes.htm

We went through something like this before. Some of the info on Mac Juke is incorrect and I wouldn't go so far to say that being a VP, Governor,Mayor, Judge, Lawyer etc means they are godly..good Lord man. Better yet, my dad was quite an alcoholic, worked in the interior involved in sawmill/logging business. I have never seen much of the interior, dont work in logging, do not touch alcohol. Should I punish for whatever actions my father may have done because some nitwit decided that?

 

The greatest fallacy preached by Christian preachers is that we are born with sin. A new baby comes into this world and doesn't even know how to breathe. He or she has to be slapped so they can cry so they can start breathing. They can't talk, walk, eat, etc. They can't do anything. How then can they already have sin? I am not religious but I like the other approach that teaches that every new born person comes into this world free of any burden that came before it. They create their own record, either good or bad. It is also a fallacy that people are more prone to doing bad than good. The opposite is actually true. When someone intends to do something virtuous, they do so quickly and easily. On the other hand, when someone intends to do something bad or sinful, they are hesitant and uneasy. And even after they commit that act, they are restless.

See Bro Keith. This is how thought and discussions are done. This is what you should have done instead of posting sermons ad nauseam. Then your actions would have mated your sworn statement.

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