Lemme tickle allyuh brain

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:
Originally Posted by Anjali:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Good morning.

Who wants to be a movie star? Yes, you can.

Gilbakka once auditioned for the movie Anmol Bandhan. The auditioner played he was shooting G and told him to drop dead. G didn't drop the way the man wanted so he lost a role.

Anyway, let's move on to our quiz today.

Up to the 1970s Hope Estate on East Coast Demerara was a coconut plantation owned by the Sankar family. The workers in that plantation lived in logies. In the 1960s a young man from one of those logies travelled to Hollywood in the USA to pursue his dream. As it turned out, he got roles in five movies between 1969 and 1980. One of them was Adios Sapata [1970] starring Oscar winning actor Yul Brynner. What is the name of that Guyanese young man?

Good morning

 

Wow Sir you are still a star

 

Joseph Persaud

You get second prize.

thanks but Riya had the first correct answer and I should be third.

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:
Originally Posted by Mars:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Good morning.

Who wants to be a movie star? Yes, you can.

Gilbakka once auditioned for the movie Anmol Bandhan. The auditioner played he was shooting G and told him to drop dead. G didn't drop the way the man wanted so he lost a role.

Anyway, let's move on to our quiz today.

Up to the 1970s Hope Estate on East Coast Demerara was a coconut plantation owned by the Sankar family. The workers in that plantation lived in logies. In the 1960s a young man from one of those logies travelled to Hollywood in the USA to pursue his dream. As it turned out, he got roles in five movies between 1969 and 1980. One of them was Adios Sapata [1970] starring Oscar winning actor Yul Brynner. What is the name of that Guyanese young man?

Joseph Persaud.

Correct. Joseph P. Persaud. He played the role of Gitano, a Mexican revolutionary in Adios Sapata.

Joseph Persaud was the character Juanito in the 1969 movie Burn starring Marlon Brando.

In the 1972 movie A Reason to Live, A Reason to Die starring James Coburn and Telly Savalas, JPP played the role as Apache.

In the 1980 movie Zombie Holocaust JPP acted as Cannibal Orderly.

In the movie Paths of War, he was an Indian Chief.

Here is a pic of Joseph P. Persaud as Apache:

http://www.wearysloth.com/Gallery/ActorsP/57786.gif

And here he is:

http://www.kino-teatr.ru/acter/foto/euro/349910.jpg

Congrats, Mars!!

 

 

Riya had the correct answer before I did. The one day I see a quiz before anybody answers it and I give the correct answer. Lo and behold, dem girls are quick on the draw.

 

My father in law was an actor in his younger days and had a part in the 1951 Hollywood production of the classic novel Native Son.

Originally Posted by Riya:

Good morning, Sir.

 

We almost had a star among us

 

 

Joseph Persaud

My profound apology, Riya. I missed your post. I was eagerly making notes about JPP's career and when I saw Mars' post I pounced on it.

Now yuh know why I didn't get the Anmol Bandhan role. Me stupiddy and paglee.

Movie review for 1951 classic Native Son with Guyanese actor Leslie Straughn. His cousin is Ramjohn Holder who played Porkpie in the British TV comedy The Desmonds.

 

http://movies.nytimes.com/movi...5BC1A9609C946092D6CF

 

MOVIE REVIEW

THE SCREEN IN REVIEW; Richard Wright Plays Hero in Movie Adaptation of His Novel, 'Native Son'

Published: June 18, 1951

"Native Son," a novel stemming from passion, conviction and genius and a work that a decade ago was translated into a shattering and compelling drama, has emerged as a sincere but strangely unconvincing film. Perhaps Mr. Wright who is the ill-fated hero of this screen transcription, which began a stand at the Criterion on Saturday, is less of an actor than he is a novelist and playwright.

Obviously, his cast does not, by and large, attain the stature of his glowing words and thoughts. For their speeches merely relate this story of a sensitive Negro's revolt against social maladjustment and bigotry without depth and true feeling. And its murder melodramatics are muscular and only occasionally professional.

Since Mr. Wright fashioned mightily once, it is not odious to compare this present version of "Native Son" with those that preceded it. He is following the general blueprint laid down in the novel and the play. His Bigger Thomas is a man with dreams but these are dreams that are anchored to Chicago's "black belt," an area where one does the kind of "work that is marked out for him."

Psychologically he is a man in revolt against the brutal exploitation of the white man, but that psychological basis for his subsequent actions is never made explicit by deed or nuance. It is simply told. He attempts to engineer a stick-up and desists because he is afraid. Bigger and his cohorts let the viewer know this in a sentence and some amateurish play acting.

Although he eventually finds a tragic surcease in man-made death, his bewilderment and the motivations for his crimes are never made completely lucid. He is still a frightened youth who accidentally smothers his employer's comely daughter and then, in his panic, tries to cover up the horrible deed because "all my life I heard of black men being killed because of white girls."

The patsy he chooses in his terror is the boy friend of the deceased girl, a man who in the book was definitely leftist but now is vaguely referred to as a labor leader. But in all fairness it must be said that Mr. Wright is not confused about him. He is no bigot and a man who honestly wants to help the Negroes. As in the book, Bigger attempts to collect ransom for the supposedly missing heiress and later, when the murder is revealed by reporters—the long arm of coincidence is stretched considerably here—he flees into hiding with his singer-girl friend. And he kills her too, under the mistaken suspicion that she has led the police to his sanctuary.

Pierre Chenal, who has directed some noteworthy films in France and has worked in South America, has turned in a lackluster effort despite the fact that the offering was shot in such unusual locales as Buenos Aires and Chicago. Although the physical face of the Argentine city is not visible, the "city of the big shoulders" shows a few seamy views of itself in South Side slum areas. Mr. Chenal's direction is, with one or two exceptions, pedestrian. He has gotten some life into the climactic chase for the harried Bigger over tenement roofs, and, in the scene where Bigger's mother prays in church for her errant son, there is a glimmer of genuine anguish.

Bigger Thomas is a man freighted by fears, hates and ignorance. But Richard Wright's portrayal is a surface one. He is a frightened fugitive finally forced to fight for his life but little else. As his girl friend, Gloria Madison, a newcomer, does a song, "The Dreaming Kind," which does not make her performance memorable. But she does have a moment or two of fervent emotion in pleading with her lover against the course he has taken.

Jean Wallace is simply blonde and beautiful in the brief role of the victim; Jean Michael is perfunctory as the labor leader; Don Dean, who plays Bigger's lawyer, is never clearly revealed in court as the liberal he was in the book and play. The rest of the cast, including Nicholas Joy and Ruth Roberts, as the parents of the heiress, illustrate the opinion of one of the reporters, who in referring to the crime says, "it's the work of amateurs." The stature of "Native Son' has been reduced with this exposure of film.


NATIVE SON, screen play by Richard Wright and Pierre Chenal; dialogue by Mr. Wright; directed by Mr. Chenal; from the novel by Mr. Wright; produced by James Prades; presented by Walter Gould and released by Classic Pictures, Inc. At the Criterion. 
Bigger Thomas . . . . . Richard Wright 
Mary Dalton . . . . . Jean Wallace 
Mr. Dalton . . . . . Nicholas Joy 
Bessie Mears . . . . . Gloria Madison 
Britten . . . . . Charles Cane 
Jan Herlons . . . . . Jean Michael 
Farley . . . . . George Rigaud 
Panama . . . . . George Green 
Hannah Thomas . . . . . Willa Pearl Curtiss 
Max . . . . . Don Dean 
Mrs. Dalton . . . . . Ruth Roberts 
Buckley . . . . . Ned Campbell 
Ernie . . . . . Charles Simmonds 
Buddy Thomas . . . . . Leslie Straughn 
Vera Thomas . . . . . Lidia Alves 
Joe . . . . . George Nathanson 
Scoop . . . . . George Roos 
Stanley . . . . . Lewis MacKenzie 
Peggy . . . . . Cecile Lezard

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Good morning. TGIF.

[1] How old is the Malteenoes Sports Club in Guyana?

[2] Who was the first President of Malteenoes Sports Club?

[3] Name three indoor games that were played at Malteenoes.

I shall acknowledge only 3 correct answers.

113 years

First President Mr. Ferdinand Christopher Archer

Domino, Darts, Checkers

Originally Posted by Riya:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Good morning. TGIF.

[1] How old is the Malteenoes Sports Club in Guyana?

[2] Who was the first President of Malteenoes Sports Club?

[3] Name three indoor games that were played at Malteenoes.

I shall acknowledge only 3 correct answers.

113 years

First President Mr. Ferdinand Christopher Archer

Domino, Darts, Checkers

Correct.

Other indoor games: badminton and table tennis.

Outdoor games: Football, cricket, field hockey.

Congrats!!

Originally Posted by Anjali:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Next quiz.

Which sports club had the leading hockey team in Guyana in 1974?

Good morning

 

The Chinese Sports Club (Cosmos)

Correct.

You get first prize.

Django gets second prize.

Congrats!!

I hope I judged fairly today.

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:
Originally Posted by Anjali:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Next quiz.

Which sports club had the leading hockey team in Guyana in 1974?

Good morning

 

The Chinese Sports Club (Cosmos)

Correct.

You get first prize.

Django gets second prize.

Congrats!!

I hope I judged fairly today.

Thanks Sir Gil  you did

Originally Posted by Anjali:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Last one for the week.

Who was the Caribbean's Under-21 Badminton Champion in 1979 and which Guyanese sports club he belonged to?

Gary Chin - Cosmos

That was fast. Correct.

Congrats!!

Have a nice weekend, everyone.

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:
Originally Posted by Anjali:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Last one for the week.

Who was the Caribbean's Under-21 Badminton Champion in 1979 and which Guyanese sports club he belonged to?

Gary Chin - Cosmos

That was fast. Correct.

Congrats!!

Have a nice weekend, everyone.

Thanks Sir Gil  have a nice weekend too

Good morning.

Look at this picture. This road is in Georgetown. At first, it was a mud road. Then it was paved with bricks.

[1] In what year were the bricks covered to make the road look as in this picture?

[2] What prompted the Georgetown city fathers to cover the bricks that year and not before?

I shall respond to two correct answers only.

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/3818548.jpg

 

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Good morning.

Look at this picture. This road is in Georgetown. At first, it was a mud road. Then it was paved with bricks.

[1] In what year were the bricks covered to make the road look as in this picture?

[2] What prompted the Georgetown city fathers to cover the bricks that year and not before?

I shall respond to two correct answers only.

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/3818548.jpg

 

1921

 

It was paved for the visit of the Prince of Wales (King Edward VII).

Originally Posted by Mars:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Good morning.

Look at this picture. This road is in Georgetown. At first, it was a mud road. Then it was paved with bricks.

[1] In what year were the bricks covered to make the road look as in this picture?

[2] What prompted the Georgetown city fathers to cover the bricks that year and not before?

I shall respond to two correct answers only.

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/3818548.jpg

 

1921

 

It was paved for the visit of the Prince of Wales (King Edward VII).

Actually the paving started in 1920 and was completed in 1921.

I accept your answers.

Congrats!!

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Next one.

Look at these clues: France/ convicted killer/ butterfly tattoo/ Devil's Island/ fugitive/ Georgetown Guyana.

What is the title of the book that contains the above clues and what is the name of its author?

Papillon by Henri Charrière.

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Next one.

Look at these clues: France/ convicted killer/ butterfly tattoo/ Devil's Island/ fugitive/ Georgetown Guyana.

What is the title of the book that contains the above clues and what is the name of its author?

Good morning

 

Papillon by Henri Charriere

Originally Posted by Mars:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

Next one.

Look at these clues: France/ convicted killer/ butterfly tattoo/ Devil's Island/ fugitive/ Georgetown Guyana.

What is the title of the book that contains the above clues and what is the name of its author?

Papillon by Henri Charrière.

Correct.

You get first prize.

Anjali gets second prize.

Congrats to you both!!

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00596/news-graphics-2005-_596650a.jpg

That's all for today.

Originally Posted by warrior:
Originally Posted by Django:

pic

the fact is papillon was not in GT but another  part of guyana sorry goggle cannot give you the answer name the part of guyana he was in 

Warria, Papillon lived briefly [tek up] with an Indian girl who was selling greens at La Penitence Market. By 1972 that girl had turned a big woman and she gave an interview to my friend John Agard for an article in the papers.

Originally Posted by warrior:
Originally Posted by Django:

pic

the fact is papillon was not in GT but another  part of guyana sorry goggle cannot give you the answer name the part of guyana he was in 

Warria, after GT Papillon travelled on the North-West District ferry to what is now Region 1. Maybe, he stayed awhile in Matthew's Ridge or Mabaruma but I look forward to your answer.

In Georgetown there is a north-south street that links Croal Street and Brickdam. That street was named for a founder of a local insurance company.

[1] What is the name of that street?

[2] What is the name of the insurance company?

[3] What is the name of the person connected to the street & insurance company?

[4] In what year was that insurance company established?

I shall respond to 4 correct answers only.

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

In Georgetown there is a north-south street that links Croal Street and Brickdam. That street was named for a founder of a local insurance company.

[1] What is the name of that street?

[2] What is the name of the insurance company?

[3] What is the name of the person connected to the street & insurance company?

[4] In what year was that insurance company established?

I shall respond to 4 correct answers only.

Good morning

 

Manget Place

Hand in Hand

Dr. Etienne Manget

1865

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

In Georgetown there is a north-south street that links Croal Street and Brickdam. That street was named for a founder of a local insurance company.

[1] What is the name of that street?

[2] What is the name of the insurance company?

[3] What is the name of the person connected to the street & insurance company?

[4] In what year was that insurance company established?

I shall respond to 4 correct answers only.

Winter Place

Hand in HAND

Mr.F.A.R Winter

1865

Originally Posted by Django:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

In Georgetown there is a north-south street that links Croal Street and Brickdam. That street was named for a founder of a local insurance company.

[1] What is the name of that street?

[2] What is the name of the insurance company?

[3] What is the name of the person connected to the street & insurance company?

[4] In what year was that insurance company established?

I shall respond to 4 correct answers only.

Winter Place

Hand in HAND

Mr.F.A.R Winter

1865

Correct answers.

Congrats!!

Originally Posted by Anjali:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

In Georgetown there is a north-south street that links Croal Street and Brickdam. That street was named for a founder of a local insurance company.

[1] What is the name of that street?

[2] What is the name of the insurance company?

[3] What is the name of the person connected to the street & insurance company?

[4] In what year was that insurance company established?

I shall respond to 4 correct answers only.

Good morning

 

Manget Place

Hand in Hand

Dr. Etienne Manget

1865

2 out of 4 correct.

Dr Manget first introduced the idea of a local insurance company because the foreign [British and others] companies had hiked premiums unreasonably. But it was Mr Winter who took the idea and actually got about forming Hand-in-Hand.

Nice try, anyway. Better luck next time.

That's all for today.

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:
Originally Posted by Django:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

In Georgetown there is a north-south street that links Croal Street and Brickdam. That street was named for a founder of a local insurance company.

[1] What is the name of that street?

[2] What is the name of the insurance company?

[3] What is the name of the person connected to the street & insurance company?

[4] In what year was that insurance company established?

I shall respond to 4 correct answers only.

Winter Place

Hand in HAND

Mr.F.A.R Winter

1865

Correct answers.

Congrats!!

Congrats Django

Originally Posted by Gilbakka:
Originally Posted by Anjali:
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:

In Georgetown there is a north-south street that links Croal Street and Brickdam. That street was named for a founder of a local insurance company.

[1] What is the name of that street?

[2] What is the name of the insurance company?

[3] What is the name of the person connected to the street & insurance company?

[4] In what year was that insurance company established?

I shall respond to 4 correct answers only.

Good morning

 

Manget Place

Hand in Hand

Dr. Etienne Manget

1865

2 out of 4 correct.

Dr Manget first introduced the idea of a local insurance company because the foreign [British and others] companies had hiked premiums unreasonably. But it was Mr Winter who took the idea and actually got about forming Hand-in-Hand.

Nice try, anyway. Better luck next time.

That's all for today.

OK Sir Gil, no problem, thank you.

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