How Guyana can end it's racial Problem in 2020 and beyond.

Ok Folks,

Guyana can end it's racial strife in 2020.

Here is how:

1. Respect for others races.

2. Appreciation of each others race and culture.

handshake 2.40.32 PM

3. Vote PPP

4. Never vote for the PNC again.

5. Make it mandatory for courses in Race relations at all levels of     Education in Guyana.

Yuji (GNI's Most respected Poster)

Please add suggestions as we look forward to a change in direction in 2020.

 

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D2 posted:
cain posted:

Racial strife could end when they put those such as yourselves in quarantine for the rest of your lives.

he he heeeee!

I have to stop laughing for a minute in order to write this comment. Most appropriate after a long day.

Cain, do you have a dictionary of phrases, or an advisory committee to assist with these classical and  appropriate comments ?

Bro, you are one of a kind.

Dogs with rabies goes to quarantine. Is that toothpaste or frothing at the mouth ?

Tola posted:
D2 posted:
cain posted:

Racial strife could end when they put those such as yourselves in quarantine for the rest of your lives.

he he heeeee!

I have to stop laughing for a minute in order to write this comment. Most appropriate after a long day.

Cain, do you have a dictionary of phrases, or an advisory committee to assist with these classical and  appropriate comments ?

Bro, you are one of a kind.

Dogs with rabies goes to quarantine. Is that toothpaste or frothing at the mouth ?

The situation of East Indians and Douglas in Guyana is no laughing matter. An East Indian in North America can safely laugh. An East Indian in North America can talk safely about racist Indians. Their traitor brown behinds are safe with laws and law enforcement protecting their traitor brown backsides..

yuji22 posted:

Ok Folks,

Guyana can end it's racial strife in 2020.

Here is how:

1. Respect for others races.

2. Appreciation of each others race and culture.

handshake 2.40.32 PM

3. Vote PPP

4. Never vote for the PNC again.

5. Make it mandatory for courses in Race relations at all levels of     Education in Guyana.

Yuji (GNI's Most respected Poster)

Please add suggestions as we look forward to a change in direction in 2020.

 

 

Prashad posted:

When people are brainwashed in society from the time that they were young to see the koolie as a subhuman inferior then the institutions of society just become a continuation.

Dr. Odeen Ishmael shared his experience about how Indians were viewed and treated in British Guiana.  He said the Africans felt socially superior to the Indians because they were educated according English standards and were employed in the civil service.

Is he right?

Billy Ram Balgobin posted:
Prashad posted:

When people are brainwashed in society from the time that they were young to see the koolie as a subhuman inferior then the institutions of society just become a continuation.

Dr. Odeen Ishmael shared his experience about how Indians were viewed and treated in British Guiana.  He said the Africans felt socially superior to the Indians because they were educated according English standards and were employed in the civil service.

Is he right?

If you read Edgar Mittelholzer's book on British Guiana society then it does prove that Dr. Odeen has a point.  My view of the issue is two-fold that experiences from colonialism has brainwashed people into the belief that the East Indian is a subhuman individual but most importantly the experiences from colonialism has grounded in people in an unbreakable belief that they should only be ruled by their own race. 

Prashad posted:
Billy Ram Balgobin posted:
Prashad posted:

When people are brainwashed in society from the time that they were young to see the koolie as a subhuman inferior then the institutions of society just become a continuation.

Dr. Odeen Ishmael shared his experience about how Indians were viewed and treated in British Guiana.  He said the Africans felt socially superior to the Indians because they were educated according English standards and were employed in the civil service.

Is he right?

If you read Edgar Mittelholzer's book on British Guiana society then it does prove that Dr. Odeen has a point.  My view of the issue is two-fold that experiences from colonialism has brainwashed people into the belief that the East Indian is a subhuman individual but most importantly the experiences from colonialism has grounded in people in an unbreakable belief that they should only be ruled by their own race. 

I went to school in Guyana and I experienced racism at the hands of Afros. If I say I did not I will be lying. 

Billy Ram Balgobin posted:
Prashad posted:

When people are brainwashed in society from the time that they were young to see the koolie as a subhuman inferior then the institutions of society just become a continuation.

Dr. Odeen Ishmael shared his experience about how Indians were viewed and treated in British Guiana.  He said the Africans felt socially superior to the Indians because they were educated according English standards and were employed in the civil service.

Is he right?

Similar situation in all the former colonies not just British Colonies. In Haiti the lighter skinned or mixed race were given the civil jobs. Same thing in Rwanda with the Hutu and Tutsi. Colonial powers favored one race/group to control the other. We are too blind and stupid to see it and then it's too late.

Prashad posted:

When people are brainwashed in society from the time that they were young to see the koolie as a subhuman inferior then the institutions of society just become a continuation.

Prashad, seek help.  For every bit of inhumanity that SOME blacks have directed to Indians SOME Indians have directed towards blacks and douglas. MANY douglas can tell you of how their Indian mothers were disowned by their parents. Look at how the Indo KKK thinks that accusing some one of having black relatives is an insult.

Blacks see nothing wrong with "douglarization". Many Indians see it as "contaminating" "pure" Indian blood with the "vile" blood of the African.  Cobra went into deep mourning when a relative of his married a black person and this was made public on GNI.  Yuji being equally bad.

Billy Ram Balgobin posted:
 

I went to school in Guyana and I experienced racism at the hands of Afros. If I say I did not I will be lying. 

And many of those Afros have their own narrative of being discriminated against by Indians, so your point?  It is an established fact that neither Africans nor Indians care much for each other.

Prashad posted:
Billy Ram Balgobin posted:
Prashad posted:

When people are brainwashed in society from the time that they were young to see the koolie as a subhuman inferior then the institutions of society just become a continuation.

Dr. Odeen Ishmael shared his experience about how Indians were viewed and treated in British Guiana.  He said the Africans felt socially superior to the Indians because they were educated according English standards and were employed in the civil service.

Is he right?

If you read Edgar Mittelholzer's book on British Guiana society then it does prove that Dr. Odeen has a point.  My view of the issue is two-fold that experiences from colonialism has brainwashed people into the belief that the East Indian is a subhuman individual but most importantly the experiences from colonialism has grounded in people in an unbreakable belief that they should only be ruled by their own race. 

This is where you display your own ignorance. In fact Mittelholzer was a "red man" who despised his African ancestry and allegedly committed suicide because of this.

In Colonial British Guiana expat whites were on top, with local whites below them, followed by Portuguese and then Chinese and light skinned CHRISTIAN Indians (the Luckhoos) and light skinned red people.  Then came the brown while blacks and Indians were at the BOTTOM.  Amerindians weren't even considered fully human so weren't part of society.

Blacks occupied lower level civil service positions, teaching, nursing, trades, and the lower ranks of the police force. For any one to claim that they were the favored ones is pure bullshyte.  The British played divide and rule. 

They allowed the blacks lower level civil servant jobs and destroyed their villages and farming and small business base as they didn't want them to be independent. They allowed Indians easier access to land but put in lace barriers for non Christians to enter the civil service, so those Indians who refused to convert and who refused to assimilate were excluded.

Bottom line is that those Indians willing to convert and who were light skinned received privileges and were as derisive of blacks as were the other privileged groups. They were EQUALLY derisive towards less assimilated Indians, especially those who remained Hindus.

Billy Ram Balgobin posted:
 

Dr. Odeen Ishmael shared his experience about how Indians were viewed and treated in British Guiana.  He said the Africans felt socially superior to the Indians because they were educated according English standards and were employed in the civil service.

Is he right?

And Indians felt superior to blacks as they have straight hair, and usually lighter in skin color, and often with more Caucasoid features. These features being highly prized during the colonial era.  This is why Indians used a term derived from the Hindi word for bastard to describe some one of mixed Indian and black ancestry.

Your point?  You know you aren't going to be allowed to peddle the lie that only blacks are racist while I am still around.

I have proven something in this post which proves my point that Guyana should make it mandatory to have race relations at all levels of the education system.

No one has provided any solutions. 

The same old talk about the problems without solutions. Zero.

SMH.

Carib wants racial tension to remain otherwise he becomes irrelevant. 

I am pushing for a solution but it may appear that Guyanese of ALL races do not want a solution and GNI is a clear reflection of the problem. These posts are a reflection of that mentality.

yuji22 posted:

I have proven something in this post which proves my point that Guyana should make it mandatory to have race relations at all levels of the education system.

No one has provided any solutions. 

 

I am pushing for a solution but it may appear that Guyanese of ALL races do not want a solution and GNI is a clear reflection of the problem. These posts are a reflection of that mentality.

Actually, from your starting post on this topic, I gather you want Guyana to end its racial problems in 2020 only on Indian/PPP terms. Your prescription: 

"3. Vote PPP

4. Never vote for the PNC again."

It is axiomatic that Indians are the PPP's electoral stronghold and Blacks are the PNC's electoral stronghold. Your points 3 and 4 have shot down your push for a solution, massa.

Push again, but this time for an all-embracing national non-discriminatory solution.

Gilbakka posted:
yuji22 posted:

I have proven something in this post which proves my point that Guyana should make it mandatory to have race relations at all levels of the education system.

No one has provided any solutions. 

 

I am pushing for a solution but it may appear that Guyanese of ALL races do not want a solution and GNI is a clear reflection of the problem. These posts are a reflection of that mentality.

Actually, from your starting post on this topic, I gather you want Guyana to end its racial problems in 2020 only on Indian/PPP terms. Your prescription: 

"3. Vote PPP

4. Never vote for the PNC again."

It is axiomatic that Indians are the PPP's electoral stronghold and Blacks are the PNC's electoral stronghold. Your points 3 and 4 have shot down your push for a solution, massa.

Push again, but this time for an all-embracing national non-discriminatory solution.

Bhai

I politely disagree. The PNC has damaged race relations to a point where the country is even more polarized and the level of mistrust is at an all time high.

The PPP is now reaching out to blacks and it appears that the PPP will ensure that blacks are an equal partner in 2020. A win win for Guyana and the PPP.

My comment about not voting for the PNC again is not in any way inaccurate since you and I have seen what they are capable of doing.

In fact, it would be best for Blacks to form another party (Like Moses did to the PPP) to foster their interests and have a bigger say in the PPP government.

Times are changing, we are in for a big surprise as the PPP is poised for another majority. This is the best opportunity to start reaching out to Blacks ahead of 2020. It is all about planning and timing in politics.

Rammo was a political dunce. Jagdeo on the other hand, is a very intelligent politician. 

 

 

Django posted:
yuji22 posted:

Rammo was a political dunce. Jagdeo on the other hand, is a very intelligent politician.

He is a "Burnhamite" look how quick he shield himself with the illegal 1980 Constitution,now he wants to run the again.

Yes, but the AFC/PNC too has no interest in changing it. 

yuji22 posted:
Django posted:
yuji22 posted:

Rammo was a political dunce. Jagdeo on the other hand, is a very intelligent politician.

He is a "Burnhamite" look how quick he shield himself with the illegal 1980 Constitution,now he wants to run the again.

Yes, but the AFC/PNC too has no interest in changing it. 

Both party not interested,the people need to protest.

Presidential Powers should be limited.

Django posted:
yuji22 posted:
Django posted:
yuji22 posted:

Rammo was a political dunce. Jagdeo on the other hand, is a very intelligent politician.

He is a "Burnhamite" look how quick he shield himself with the illegal 1980 Constitution,now he wants to run the again.

Yes, but the AFC/PNC too has no interest in changing it. 

Both party not interested,the people need to protest.

Presidential Powers should be limited.

I have to agree but until it is changed, it can be taken advantage of. That's politics.

The ball is now in the AFC/PNC court. They made a very big deal about while in opposition and have suddenly gone silent and appear to have forgotten about this issue.

yuji22 posted: The ball is now in the AFC/PNC court. They made a very big deal about while in opposition and have suddenly gone silent and appear to have forgotten about this issue.

Absolutely. One of the main planks in the APNU+AFC Manifesto was Constitutional Reform, especially as it relates to excessive powers of the President. Those crooks conned us. Wha me must call dem? Katahar? Gaddaha? Filth heads? There is no title in the GNI vocabulary to fit those deceitful people.

As for the PPP, even Jagan was unwilling to amend the Constitution and reduce presidential powers. Disappointing, to say the least.

Gilbakka posted:
As for the PPP, even Jagan was unwilling to amend the Constitution and reduce presidential powers. Disappointing, to say the least.

I don't think he was unwilling...he just didn't see a need for it given his honesty and caring.  However, there is a reason why a person's historical significance is not written the day he/she dies. Jagan was very popular and well liked the day he died.  However, it turns out that he was a very poor leader and is a reason why we are in the situation we are in today.

The lack of constitutional reform and putting square pegs in round holes during his term mark his mediocre presidency.  He was a great, honest, knowledgeable man but a very poor leader.

Hey D2 - Please see if you could dig up the thread on Leadership also.  Too bad we lost these discussions if we did.

Guyana should revert to the 1966 Independence Constitution.

Source

Dear Editor,

I read that the Carter Center and the University of Guyana will host a symposium on constitutional reform on Friday, March 31. It is my opinion that proportional representation (PR) and the list system have harmed race relations and the democratic process in Guyana by enabling racial mobilization and party dictatorship. The consequences have been ethnic division, a farce of a parliament, and a mockery of coalition politics.

Under our electoral system voters do not directly elect their members of parliament (MP). Rather we vote for a list of candidates that are fielded by the political parties and the political parties through the List of Representatives select the MPs. In reality the political bosses select the MPs. The MPs are not accountable to local constituencies but rather to the party. In Parliament the MP is not allowed to vote according to conscience but must toe the party line or risk being fired by the party. This most certainly is not parliamentary democracy but party dictatorship.

Coupled with party dictatorship is racial mobilization. If we look at our political history we will see that since PR was introduced in December 1964 it made it much easier for the main parties to engage in electoral mobilization along racial lines, so much so that today in 2017 we have entrenched racial blocs supporting both parties. There is no need for the parties to have good programmes and appeal to reason. It is much easier to appeal to race by subtle and sometimes crude language. There is no need for a candidate to work house to house in seeking the votes of all, irrespective of ethnicity as was the case when we had first past the post (FPTP) prior to 1964.

Post-1964 found that both major parties had embraced Socialist ideology which naturally inculcated dictatorship instincts in their leadership. Such dictatorial instincts spilled over to the Parliament where they literally opposed each other. No matter what the PNC proposed the PPP opposed and vice versa. There was never compromise. It was always about the majority party getting its way. The only time the PPP and PNC found common ground was to pass the Recall Bill which gave them legal ownership of the parliamentary seats and the power to fire dissenting MPs! It also effectively turned Parliament into a farce. All of this because of the list system.

The list system has essentially made a mockery of post-independence coalition politics, as coalitions must be formed before elections and they must also put up a common list with the List Represen-tative selecting the MPs. It means that no one party owns a seat or seats. A party cannot leave the coalition with its seats. If a party walks away the seats remain with the coalition. In such an arrangement the smaller parties are rendered impotent, unless they control the List Representa-tive, which would be most unlikely. So smaller parties must accept the dictates of the larger ones. In Guyana a coalition government simply cannot be brought down by a junior partner. This is totally different from real parliamentary democracies that adhere to the Westminster constitutions under which they all got at Independence.

All the functioning parliamentary democracies such as India, Barbados, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago have one thing in common: They all kept the Westminster type constitutions that they got from the British. So my first recommendation is for Guyana to revert to the 1966 Independence Constitution, but I know the main parties would not do so.

My other recommendations are as follows: replace PR with FPTP thereby ending the list system; repeal the Recall Bill thereby enabling MPs to vote according to conscience; scrap the rule that disallows post-election coalitions thereby permitting post-election coalitions with every party having their own seats.

Yours faithfully,

Malcolm Harripaul

Gilbakka posted:
yuji22 posted: The ball is now in the AFC/PNC court. They made a very big deal about while in opposition and have suddenly gone silent and appear to have forgotten about this issue.

Absolutely. One of the main planks in the APNU+AFC Manifesto was Constitutional Reform, especially as it relates to excessive powers of the President. Those crooks conned us. Wha me must call dem? Katahar? Gaddaha? Filth heads? There is no title in the GNI vocabulary to fit those deceitful people.

As for the PPP, even Jagan was unwilling to amend the Constitution and reduce presidential powers. Disappointing, to say the least.

So why the AFC is no longer talking about constitutional reforms?  They seem to be in the role of dancing for the PNC instead of the PNC dancing for them.

yuji22 posted:

I have proven something in this post which proves my point that Guyana should make it mandatory to have race relations at all levels of the education system.

 

Guyanese aren't ignorant of each other.  And aside from a minority of Indo KKK racists like you, they don't hate one another either.

Now YOU need to be educated to the fact that blacks aren't lazy, criminal or useless and that it isn't the height of disgrace if a member of your family marries a suitable person who happens to be black. 

YOU need to be educated to the fact that racism has been practiced by both groups when they have power, and that both groups, and others have suffered.

YOU need to understand that Indians face criminal assault, not only from blacks, but increasingly from Indians as well.

Solution.

1. We need to listen to each other. If blacks tell you that Jagdeo is a racist and the PPP discriminated against blacks then you ought to listen. 

You never see me arguing with you about the racism of the PNC during the Burnham era. If the majority of Indians claim that they faced racism then they did. The fact that a small % enriched themselves with black market activities which arose when Burnham destroyed the economy is not relevant.

2.We need to identify ethnically based barriers to social and economic integration because this is what bothers people in 2017. They couldn't care less about the early 60s, or even the Burnham era.  Its those of us who migrated who still do.

3. We need to have a discussion about what Guyana is and understand that it is a multi ethnic, multi cultural and multi religious. We need to understand that not only is there this diversity but that most Guyanese incorporate elements of this WITHIN their daily lives. 

So those who debase creole culture and scream for India need to stop being ridiculous. India no longer sees you as one of them.  We all exist within various continuums of a diverse creolized culture, and we manifest this as we see relevant.  Changing depending on context.

4.  Guyanese need to cease to expect politicians to control their lives. It is up to civic society (trade unions, youth groups, business groups, civic groups like the Jaycees, religious groups, etc.) to mobilize the population and to communicate with the politicians their expectations of them. 

T&T is also diverse as Guyana and yet the sort of nonsense that Burnham, Jagdeo and now Harmon get up to would NEVER be allowed in that country, because the politicians know that civic society in T&T will NOT tolerate that.

Under Kamla one of her ministers refused to listen to a CAL cabin attendant who told him to turn off his cell phone. He "accidentally" brushed her breasts.  He was fired.

Under Jagdeo/Ramotar a minister pistol whips some one, another drives drunk and hits some one and yet another has a son who sexually assaulted some one, and then bribed a cop to cover this up. NOTHING happened!

I suggest that you stop worshipping a racist Jagdeo when the 29% of the population which is African and the 20% of the population which is mixed (many of these mixed identified individuals are people who you would call black) say he was a racist when he was in power. If almost half of the population see him as an ogre then clearly he is NOT the solution.

yuji22 posted:
 solution.

Bhai

I politely disagree. The PNC has damaged race relations to a point where the country is even more polarized and the level of mistrust is at an all time high.

 

 

 

This is why there will  be ethnic mistrust in Guyana. So caught up in your "Indian Narrative" that you fail to understand that other narratives exist.

As to the PPP reaching out to blacks. Well they had 23 years to do so but instead engaged in the same rampant racism that you accuse the PNC of practicing. 

You want to divide the black vote to get Indian dominance, now that Indians are a declining population. What does that have to do with solving the problem?

You know what might change the situation. Let the PPP select is its leader a black man who enjoys popularity among blacks. Nigel Hughes as the PPP presidential candidate will be a game changer.

Django posted:

Guyana should revert to the 1966 Independence Constitution.

Source

 

Coupled with party dictatorship is racial mobilization. If we look at our political history we will see that since PR was introduced in December 1964 it made it much easier for the main parties to engage in electoral mobilization along racial lines,

Malcolm Harripaul

While I agree that MPs serving at the pleasure of the party and not of the voters is a fast fire way to dictatorship he mustn't pretend that ethnic voting only began in 1964. It was a feature of the elections in 1956 and in 1961 as well.

The solution cannot be political. It is a healthier civic environment where Guyanese at large, and not just the politicians, deal with the issue of ethnic mistrust which will lead to a healthier political environment.

Guyanese must stop fooling themselves that the fact that they tolerate each other on a daily basis means that all is well and that its only the politicians who create the problem. We vote for our monster because we fear what will happen to us if the other monster is in charge.

We don't trust each other and one can see this right here in NYC where black and Indian Guyanese have almost nothing to do with each other.  We don't live under Granger or Jagdeo and yet ethnic mistrust still dominates, to the point where this is highly noticeable even to non Caribbean people.

caribny posted:
Django posted:

Guyana should revert to the 1966 Independence Constitution.

Source

 

Coupled with party dictatorship is racial mobilization. If we look at our political history we will see that since PR was introduced in December 1964 it made it much easier for the main parties to engage in electoral mobilization along racial lines,

Malcolm Harripaul

While I agree that MPs serving at the pleasure of the party and not of the voters is a fast fire way to dictatorship he mustn't pretend that ethnic voting only began in 1964. It was a feature of the elections in 1956 and in 1961 as well.

The solution cannot be political. It is a healthier civic environment where Guyanese at large, and not just the politicians, deal with the issue of ethnic mistrust which will lead to a healthier political environment.

Guyanese must stop fooling themselves that the fact that they tolerate each other on a daily basis means that all is well and that its only the politicians who create the problem. We vote for our monster because we fear what will happen to us if the other monster is in charge.

We don't trust each other and one can see this right here in NYC where black and Indian Guyanese have almost nothing to do with each other.  We don't live under Granger or Jagdeo and yet ethnic mistrust still dominates, to the point where this is highly noticeable even to non Caribbean people.

Speak fuh yuhself cuz. My Guyanese friends are just that, Guyanese. There are quite a few Guyanese working where I work both Indo and Afro and I have yet to see any sort of clannishness or the like. And I am speaking about people from recent college graduates to people close to retirement. I suppose it's all about how you feel and how you treat people. If you think someone is different or inferior or however else you may envision them, then you're very likely to see that sentiment reciprocated.  

GTAngler posted:
 

Speak fuh yuhself cuz. My Guyanese friends are just that, Guyanese.

Where do Indians live? Where do black Guyanese live? What associations do they have where there are equally involved?

It is an accepted fact that in NYC Indo and Afro Guyanese have little to do with each other.

I look forward to your lists of all of the Guyanese associations where involvement is at least 60:40.

What you purport to be your experience is irrelevant when there are at least 200k Guyanese living in NYC.

In fact on GNI we all know who is Indian and who isn't, even though we don't know each other, and not every one identifies who they are upfront.

Irrelevant, probably. The norm, also probably. I'll wager it's more that the few here out of that 200,000. By the way, a few of the younger Guyanese here were born in the US and when we converse among ourselves you couldn't tell. Two of Afro descent and one of Indo.  I can't speak for everyone but I can tell you why we ended up in Queens. The relatives we came to lived in Queens and when we moved to an apartment, a family friend knew someone, another Guyanese who had a building in Queens with reasonable rent. It was either Queens or a building in Far Rockaway. We knew nobody there so here we are. Lot of the old man's friends and colleagues lived in Brooklyn and he organized several club competitions between social clubs there and here in Queens. People will move where they feel the most comfortable and where it's also economically feasible.

GTAngler posted:

Irrelevant, probably. The norm, also probably..

The norm is that even in Queens Afro and Indo Guyanese live in different neighborhoods, move in different social circles and don't miss each other.

Face it. We don't trust each other, nor do we see each other as one people.

Not saying you're entirely wrong. There are those elements which have held on to that historical racial bias and in some cases, religious bigotry. It prevails mostly among the older generation. I specifically mentioned those three here because that's what I am hoping for the future. Unless we have some level of compromise and cooperation, we aren't going anywhere.

GTAngler posted:
caribny posted:
Django posted:
 

We don't trust each other and one can see this right here in NYC where black and Indian Guyanese have almost nothing to do with each other.  We don't live under Granger or Jagdeo and yet ethnic mistrust still dominates, to the point where this is highly noticeable even to non Caribbean people.

Speak fuh yuhself cuz. My Guyanese friends are just that, Guyanese. There are quite a few Guyanese working where I work both Indo and Afro and I have yet to see any sort of clannishness or the like. And I am speaking about people from recent college graduates to people close to retirement. I suppose it's all about how you feel and how you treat people. If you think someone is different or inferior or however else you may envision them, then you're very likely to see that sentiment reciprocated.  

Never had a problem with Afro Guyanese over here.  I have met many in social and working environment and they have all been helpful.  The distrust between races were created by politics.  Prior to the 1960s there was not that much distrust.

 

caribny posted:
GTAngler posted:

Irrelevant, probably. The norm, also probably..

The norm is that even in Queens Afro and Indo Guyanese live in different neighborhoods, move in different social circles and don't miss each other.

Face it. We don't trust each other, nor do we see each other as one people.

You don't have to live together to trust each other.  I have a friend in Guyana who hires mainly blacks from the other village and they have great relationships.

I lived among blacks in Barr St and never a problem.  In fact, the problems I had were mainly with Indians.

It is the uninformed that allow themselves to be caught in the race-based political trap.

VVP posted:
caribny posted:
GTAngler posted:

Irrelevant, probably. The norm, also probably..

The norm is that even in Queens Afro and Indo Guyanese live in different neighborhoods, move in different social circles and don't miss each other.

Face it. We don't trust each other, nor do we see each other as one people.

You don't have to live together to trust each other.  I have a friend in Guyana who hires mainly blacks from the other village and they have great relationships.

I lived among blacks in Barr St and never a problem.  In fact, the problems I had were mainly with Indians.

It is the uninformed that allow themselves to be caught in the race-based political trap.

Same here VVP,we can shake hand.

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