Guyana Ronald Ramjattan knighted by Queen Elizabeth II

Guyana Ronald Ramjattan knighted by Queen Elizabeth II

October 19, 2014 | By | Filed Under News 

Although he left these shores more than a decade ago, Ronald Ramjattan still has a very

Ronald Ramjattan receives his award from Queen Elizabeth

Ronald Ramjattan receives his award from Queen Elizabeth

prevailing presence in Guyana, throughout the Caribbean and further afield. He is the business mogul standing firmly behind the well known Baron Foods Limited. As a Food Entrepreneur for many years he has maintained a flawless and distinguished reputation which was perhaps enough for him to be awarded with the Order of the British Empire (OBE) at Buckingham Palace. The award was bestowed upon him on October 9, last, by Queen Elizabeth II. According to Ramjattan in an invited comment to this publication yesterday, “it was indeed a humbling experience for me as a Guyanese coming from a normal background.” With unreserved modesty, he spoke of being an entrepreneur in Saint Lucia, his adopted home, for more than 24 years, and was elated to not only be recognized, but be auspiciously honoured by the Queen. “I am indeed fortunate,” said Ramjattan who has been exporting his over 125 food products from Saint Lucia to Guyana for the last 20 years. All of his products have also been consistently maintaining an ISO 22000 Standard and are also exported throughout the English, Dutch and French Islands of the Caribbean, North America and Europe. His integral support to the Saint Lucian economy saw the Government there nominating him for the OBE award which was accepted by the Queen. Though grateful for the recognition, Ramjattan is of the belief that the honour “is a plus for Guyana and Guyanese living outside.” His cousin Khemraj Ramjattan, prominent Attorney at Law and leader of the Alliance For Change, said that he is “over the moon with pride and joy” because of the achievement. In a congratulatory note, he outlined that he is “proud of this magnificent moment, this crowning achievement for a man of such humble beginnings. Sir, you have not only walked with us ordinary mortals, but now with Royalty. You are our Champion and Hero. Continue making us proud brother.” But Ronald Ramjattan is however convinced that had he remained in Guyana he would not have been bestowed with such a high honour. This is in light of the fact that since becoming a Republic, Guyana does not currently have the capacity to nominate a candidate to receive an award from Her Majesty the Queen. Like a number of other Caribbean territories, the Queen remains the head of Saint Lucia and can accept nominations for such awards. But according to Ramjattan, what Guyana can seek to continuously embrace is the notion of national accolades for those who so deserve.  He turned his attention to West Indies star batsman, Shivnarine Chanderpaul, whom he believes should have long been the recipient of, at least, Guyana’s Order of Roraima, a feat that “(many) people have been clamouring for.” In fact it was very concerning to the OBE awardee that “the Government of Guyana has not even been recognizing the lawyers of Guyana for the longest while…” The Guyana-born Ramjattan has manufacturing plants in St Lucia and Grenada and has plans to expand further with the introduction of a plant in Trinidad. He has been constructing the latter proposed plan for the past two years. He is a well known personality when it comes to outstanding business performances, evident by the fact that he had copped, for the fifth consecutive year, the Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year award for OCEC countries. Ramjattan coveted the Best Pepper Sauce Prize (2014) in Brussels, ahead of being awarded the OBE. He is currently President for the Saint Lucian Manufacturers Association and Chairman of the Trade Export Council of Saint Lucia. “That alone shows my background and my export capabilities and what I am doing must be right for the last 15-20 years to be receiving all these awards,” said an ecstatic Ramjattan who noted that “my products have been receiving awards locally, regionally and internationally.” The married father of one was born in Den Amstel, West Coast Demerara, and grew up at Number 47 Village, Corentyne, Berbice. He worked his way up the food business chain first as a Laboratory Technician at the Guyana Sugar Corporation then as Production Manager at Ricks and Sari. While his heart remains in Guyana, Ramjattan is currently not too keen on returning to these shores. According to him, “the situation has to change; the crime rate has to reduce…Guyana itself has to scale up fiscal incentives for manufacturers who just don’t have to go and sit down and make request to the Government.” “I feel just like Trinidad (for instance), you apply, you get through…in Saint Lucia you apply and you go to the Trade Export Board or something like that…but Guyana you have to come and appeal and be singled out…there is not a fiscal incentive for manufacturers alone or for every sector; you have to come and make your case to get (that),” said Ramjattan. According to him, he has in the past made a few applications, but none were successful to the point of getting off the ground. He nevertheless was keen on emphasizing that young local entrepreneurs must seek to remain focused although he is somewhat pessimistic about the business climate. “So many of us are so successful outside of Guyana, but when you come here it is a few companies that are so successful, but the young entrepreneurs in the manufacturing sector remain at a low level,” said Ramjattan. This state of affairs he has linked to the low disposable income in Guyana and a lack of an enabling environment. “I am reading with concern what is happening with Kaieteur News and its owner; I am reading with concern about several other business owners who are trying to do good and yet they are not being successful, because the enabling environment is not there,” said Ramjattan, whose products have however found much favour on the local market.

Original Post

Though grateful for the recognition, Ramjattan is of the belief that the honour “is a plus for Guyana and Guyanese living outside.” His cousin Khemraj Ramjattan, prominent Attorney at Law and leader of the Alliance For Change, said that he is “over the moon with pride and joy” because of the achievement. In a congratulatory note, he outlined that he is “proud of this magnificent moment, this crowning achievement for a man of such humble beginnings. Sir, you have not only walked with us ordinary mortals, but now with Royalty. You are our Champion and Hero. Continue making us proud brother.” 

While his heart remains in Guyana, Ramjattan is currently not too keen on returning to these shores. According to him, “the situation has to change; the crime rate has to reduce…Guyana itself has to scale up fiscal incentives for manufacturers who just don’t have to go and sit down and make request to the Government.” “I feel just like Trinidad (for instance), you apply, you get through…in Saint Lucia you apply and you go to the Trade Export Board or something like that…but Guyana you have to come and appeal and be singled out…there is not a fiscal incentive for manufacturers alone or for every sector; you have to come and make your case to get (that),” said Ramjattan. According to him, he has in the past made a few applications, but none were successful to the point of getting off the ground. He nevertheless was keen on emphasizing that young local entrepreneurs must seek to remain focused although he is somewhat pessimistic about the business climate. “So many of us are so successful outside of Guyana, but when you come here it is a few companies that are so successful, but the young entrepreneurs in the manufacturing sector remain at a low level,” said Ramjattan. This state of affairs he has linked to the low disposable income in Guyana and a lack of an enabling environment. “I am reading with concern what is happening with Kaieteur News and its owner; I am reading with concern about several other business owners who are trying to do good and yet they are not being successful, because the enabling environment is not there,” said Ramjattan, whose products have however found much favour on the local market.

I recall having a drink with this guy Ronald Ramjattan one time in the 1980s. He was working at Ricks & Sari. We were introduced by a mutual friend Kam Saywack of Pike Street, Kitty. I congratulate him now for the high honour the Queen bestowed.

Originally Posted by Mitwah:

 

Congratulations to Ronald.

 

 

RONALD RAMJATTAN IS A DOER. HIS COUSIN KHEMRAJ RAMJATAN IS A TALKER.

 

* DOERS gets things done. They are men of action.

 

* TALKERS like Khemraj and Moses are full of HOT AIR----they are blowhards---waste of oxygen those 2 doofus.

 

* Guyana needs more DOERS like Ronald.

 

Rev

 

 

Originally Posted by Rev:
Originally Posted by Mitwah:

 

Congratulations to Ronald.

 

 

RONALD RAMJATTAN IS A DOER. HIS COUSIN KHEMRAJ RAMJATAN IS A TALKER.

 

 

Rev

 

 

KHEMRAJ RAMJATTAN WILL BE DOING HIS NO CONFIDENCE THING SOON TO UNDO THE PPP.

[Gilbakka must not forget his manners; Marning, Rev]

Originally Posted by Rev:
Originally Posted by Mitwah:

 

Congratulations to Ronald.

 

 

RONALD RAMJATTAN IS A DOER. HIS COUSIN KHEMRAJ RAMJATAN IS A TALKER.

 

* DOERS gets things done. They are men of action.

 

* TALKERS like Khemraj and Moses are full of HOT AIR----they are blowhards---waste of oxygen those 2 doofus.

 

* Guyana needs more DOERS like Ronald.

 

Rev

 

 Rev & Yuji are DOERS like Kwame

 

Originally Posted by Rev:
Originally Posted by Mitwah:

 

Congratulations to Ronald.

 

 

RONALD RAMJATTAN IS A DOER. HIS COUSIN KHEMRAJ RAMJATAN IS A TALKER.

 

* DOERS gets things done. They are men of action.

 

* TALKERS like Khemraj and Moses are full of HOT AIR----they are blowhards---waste of oxygen those 2 doofus.

 

* Guyana needs more DOERS like Ronald.

 

Rev

 

 

Typical Rev. The man is as predictable as sumatoo is sweet. He couldn't resist the effeminate urge of "doers" and "talkers". This fellah has some serious psychiatric issues as epitomized by his use of language.

Originally Posted by Rev:
Originally Posted by Mitwah:

 

Congratulations to Ronald.

 

 

RONALD RAMJATTAN IS A DOER. HIS COUSIN KHEMRAJ RAMJATAN IS A TALKER.

 

* DOERS gets things done. They are men of action.

 

* TALKERS like Khemraj and Moses are full of HOT AIR----they are blowhards---waste of oxygen those 2 doofus.

 

* Guyana needs more DOERS like Ronald.

 

Rev

 

 

 

Originally Posted by Mitwah:

While his heart remains in Guyana, Ramjattan is currently not too keen on returning to these shores. According to him, “the situation has to change; the crime rate has to reduce…Guyana itself has to scale up fiscal incentives for manufacturers who just don’t have to go and sit down and make request to the Government.” “I feel just like Trinidad (for instance), you apply, you get through…in Saint Lucia you apply and you go to the Trade Export Board or something like that…but Guyana you have to come and appeal and be singled out…there is not a fiscal incentive for manufacturers alone or for every sector; you have to come and make your case to get (that),” said Ramjattan. According to him, he has in the past made a few applications, but none were successful to the point of getting off the ground. He nevertheless was keen on emphasizing that young local entrepreneurs must seek to remain focused although he is somewhat pessimistic about the business climate. “So many of us are so successful outside of Guyana, but when you come here it is a few companies that are so successful, but the young entrepreneurs in the manufacturing sector remain at a low level,” said Ramjattan. This state of affairs he has linked to the low disposable income in Guyana and a lack of an enabling environment. “I am reading with concern what is happening with Kaieteur News and its owner; I am reading with concern about several other business owners who are trying to do good and yet they are not being successful, because the enabling environment is not there,” said Ramjattan, whose products have however found much favour on the local market.

.

 

 

Ronald Ramjattan receives his award from Queen Elizabeth

Ronald Ramjattan receives his award from Queen Elizabeth

Gil, there is a word in your sentence tells me you might not be from Berbice.

Dem people at Catherina used to laugh at me about it in the 60s.

No, Its not 'marning neighba'.   

 

[Gilbakka must not forget his manners; Marning, Rev]

Originally Posted by Tola:

Gil, there is a word in your sentence tells me you might not be from Berbice.

Dem people at Catherina used to laugh at me about it in the 60s.

No, Its not 'marning neighba'.   

 

[Gilbakka must not forget his manners; Marning, Rev]

Hey, Tola, I'm now seeing your comment. I took time off today to finish off I book that's due at the library.

I recently mentioned you in connection with that WHO report saying Guyana has the world's highest suicide rate. I recall you had said how your suicide prevention NGO was rebuffed in Berbice.

Now, regarding my use of the word "marning". You guessed right; I'm not Berbician. West Demerara two-thirds of my life in Guyana, Georgetown-Kitty the remaining third. In GT they say "marning" too; they used to.

Gil, Most Berbician say 'feget' and the person I was about to marry on the WC had a friendly laugh at my accent. Maybe that might be why she  marry a guy from Uitvlugt. OMGoodness  that was 50 years ago. Life does have its twists and turns.
Spent less than one third of my life in Guyana and most in Canada's west coast. Mara's country, as he calls it. 
 
I was just about to write you regarding  the book I am now reading when  the phone rang, with a lady  who wanted to start a group  in our town about how to deal with suicides in families.
As you know, 'sudden death' scenarios can have severe consequences for families, if they are not open in dealing with their feelings and emotions.
Recently a friend's son died from gunshot,his wife died months later, because she was not able to cope.
 
The book I am now reading was last printed in 1938 and set in the South Pacific[where I visited as a marine radio officer], called  'The Hurricane' by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall.  They wrote my favourite trilogy about the Bounty.
As a teenager 'Mutiny on the Bounty' at Albion school  left a lasting impression on me, especially with two teachers courting, who eventually marry each other.  
I am in the process of visiting Pitcairn's Island.
 
I was angry when I read the WHO report, because we have corporate resources to assist the youth in Guyana, but some self serving official with no conscious have other ideas.
I don't understand these people, the parents of the youth we are trying to assist, voted for these guys to stay in power.  
 
Dr. Yog Mahadeo recently wrote the letter below...
 
October 17, 2014 | By | Filed Under Letters
 

Dear Editor,

We have gone past the time for another perambulation of Georgetown in a vaunted Suicide Walk. It cannot and will not replace education, counselling and the tremendous work we the parents have to do. Each suicide; each unfortunate death in this country is an indictment on our conscience as a people. Do we really care? I am sorry to hear of Alex’s suicide in West Coast. And, I am sorry to hear that some blame is being pinned to the Principal. I have the highest regard for Swami Ashkarananda. I wish we could be blessed with a fraction of the patience and discipline that he lives by on a daily basis. Yes he is stern, yes he is strict -and sometimes harshly so. But which Leader, what Parent and what disciplinarian should not be stern and strict? As is, we make international headlines on this matter and all we do is walk. Yet, most suicides are related to discipline/rebellion or “puppy-love”. The question is what are we prepared to do to deal with this monster called suicide? And, it has to start with our system. We ALL need to start taking personal responsibility for every death. We cannot depend on a system  that is failing us. Let us take responsibility and not blame anyone. So, the question is, have we failed our children who are commiting murder of themselves? Is there anything we can do? I believe we should start talking about this more. Parents and children need to start talking. This has to become a family discussion matter. Teachers must also start friendly discussions on this. Let it be weekly. Where are the school guidance counselors? I also believe that the Ministry of Health must start preparing counselors to be on call. Our children are too important to shuffle this away. I will volunteer to be trained and to provide such service if needed. Is it going to be enough? Maybe not. But let’s start today, let’s save our children. They are but a reflection of ourselves, our country and our system. They can be saved – by us. Time to start is now. To Mom and Dad of Alex, our deepest sympathies. To all mothers or fathers that lost a child to suicide…. our sympathies. In closing, I call upon all parents who have lost a child to suicide: You have lost a child – but you must feel empowered to lead this fight so that we do not lose another son or daughter. This is our call, for the sake of our children.

Dr. Yog Mahadeo

 

.....and I drafted a reply about ' Do we really care'? for KN , but the volunteers in Guyana who were part of our program are still afraid about victimization, if the 'big man' who demanded the fee is identified. It might also burn my bridge to Guyana. These people are heartless with victimization in their blood.

This is insane, we were victimized while trying to improve lives and we cannot talk openly about it.  For this reason and more, we need a new government in Guyana.  

 

I am  trying  to make personal contact with you and Mitwah, any suggestions? If you know my correct name Google it.

Tek care, 

        
 
Originally Posted by Gilbakka:
Originally Posted by Tola:

Gil, there is a word in your sentence tells me you might not be from Berbice.

Dem people at Catherina used to laugh at me about it in the 60s.

No, Its not 'marning neighba'.   

 

[Gilbakka must not forget his manners; Marning, Rev]

Hey, Tola, I'm now seeing your comment. I took time off today to finish off I book that's due at the library.

I recently mentioned you in connection with that WHO report saying Guyana has the world's highest suicide rate. I recall you had said how your suicide prevention NGO was rebuffed in Berbice.

Now, regarding my use of the word "marning". You guessed right; I'm not Berbician. West Demerara two-thirds of my life in Guyana, Georgetown-Kitty the remaining third. In GT they say "marning" too; they used to.

 

Prashad posted:

British knighthood is KBE . Like Ron Sanders KBE . Mr. Rumjatan got an OBE. Officer of the British Empire.

Prash, there is no KBE. The highest ranking of the three is a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE), followed by OBE (Officer) and then the MBE (Member).

Are you not proud of him?

 

Check it out here:

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