Guyana producing foreign products – Private sector

Guyana producing foreign products – Private sector

Oct 12, 2017 Dem Boys Seh, Features / Columnists, News, https://www.kaieteurnewsonline...ucts-private-sector/

De local private sector host a business summit to sell Guyana and market what we produce. Soulja Bai and ee govt, de opposition, dem other politicians was present.

Nuff people from foreign countries come; dem also had nuff local business people. Dem had representatives from de manufacturing sector.

Dem talk bout technology. Dem talk how dem give internet to nuff schools. Dem talk bout energy sector. Dem talk bout blackout and then dem bout market in general.

Dem also talk bout rice, sugar, gold, bauxite and dem other sectors, including wood.

Then dem talk bout market. Wha tek de cake was not one of dem talk bout de foreign products that tek over Guyana.

Every stand, every shelf, every supermarket, every shop across Guyana is sheer foreign stuff. Despite all these, local manufacturers was present and not a single local product was on display to be marketed.

During de tea break dem boys go to grab a cup of tea. What dem see shock dem. Was a set of teabags, fruit juices–all was foreign. When dem boys look further dem realize that down to de sugar fuh put in de tea was foreign. De only local thing was a flyer and dem boys isn’t certain if it print here in Guyana.

One lady ask de private sector and de local manufacturers, “Wha happening here?” You woulda think Donald Trump dead. De place get silent. Nobody wouldn’t talk and when dem talk dem answer a question wha de lady didn’t even ask.

Talk half and listen fuh wha dem gun seh today.

Original Post
Drugb posted:

Guyanese are their own worse enemy.  They have an appetite for foreign items and don't support local products. Look how slop can boy was bragging about burger king the other day.  

Wallah,did i brag or post the article ??,you have the tendency to make things up.

Drugb posted:

Guyanese are their own worse enemy.  They have an appetite for foreign items and don't support local products. Look how slop can boy was bragging about burger king the other day.  

Any imported item that can be produced locally at a similar quality or better should be either banned or taxed so heavily that the locals are forced to buy local. Mind you, the same people supporting buy local will at the drop of a hat do a 180 and shout racism and how the government is punishing people if implemented by the current government.

You ned a brain to formulate Policies and to implement them. The PNC proved and are proving that they are not capable, equipped to do so.

I can go on and on like the Energizer Bunny but some of you will still be stuck in FILTH.

The Trains in Guyana, Al00, Dhal, Garlic, Onion, Frying Oil were all prohibited/discarded without  1 (ONE) plan, thought, idea on the replacement. Hence, Guyana was SHIT for 28 years and is currently in SHIT and will be so for another2 1/2 years.

Nehru posted:

You ned a brain to formulate Policies and to implement them. The PNC proved and are proving that they are not capable, equipped to do so.

I can go on and on like the Energizer Bunny but some of you will still be stuck in FILTH.

The Trains in Guyana, Al00, Dhal, Garlic, Onion, Frying Oil were all prohibited/discarded without  1 (ONE) plan, thought, idea on the replacement. Hence, Guyana was SHIT for 28 years and is currently in SHIT and will be so for another2 1/2 years.

I don't think you'll find anyone here who will disagree with you except maybe for the trains. They were getting too expensive to maintain. None of those other items are locally produced. We all agree that those specific items were focused on by the Burnham regime to target one specific group, Indo-Guyanese. Let's focus on now.

Django posted:
Drugb posted:

Guyanese are their own worse enemy.  They have an appetite for foreign items and don't support local products. Look how slop can boy was bragging about burger king the other day.  

Wallah,did i brag or post the article ??,you have the tendency to make things up.

Are you slop can boy? Speak only when you are spoken to. 

GTAngler posted:
Drugb posted:

Guyanese are their own worse enemy.  They have an appetite for foreign items and don't support local products. Look how slop can boy was bragging about burger king the other day.  

Any imported item that can be produced locally at a similar quality or better should be either banned or taxed so heavily that the locals are forced to buy local. Mind you, the same people supporting buy local will at the drop of a hat do a 180 and shout racism and how the government is punishing people if implemented by the current government.

Burnham tried that but it was a failure, people will not respond to a boot on their heads. It has to be awareness for the common good and pride in buying local. Today Guyanese scorn local products. They would rather open a pack of kool aid and mix with water rather than squeeze two orange.  

In the US ever so often we scream the same whenever the economy is in trouble, "buy local". Then when the economy picks up, its back to foreign products. 

Drugb posted:
GTAngler posted:
Drugb posted:

Guyanese are their own worse enemy.  They have an appetite for foreign items and don't support local products. Look how slop can boy was bragging about burger king the other day.  

Any imported item that can be produced locally at a similar quality or better should be either banned or taxed so heavily that the locals are forced to buy local. Mind you, the same people supporting buy local will at the drop of a hat do a 180 and shout racism and how the government is punishing people if implemented by the current government.

Burnham tried that but it was a failure, people will not respond to a boot on their heads. It has to be awareness for the common good and pride in buying local. Today Guyanese scorn local products. They would rather open a pack of kool aid and mix with water rather than squeeze two orange.  

In the US ever so often we scream the same whenever the economy is in trouble, "buy local". Then when the economy picks up, its back to foreign products. 

As usual, you are running around in circles, tripping over your own contradictions.

What's the point?

GTAngler posted:
 

Any imported item that can be produced locally at a similar quality or better should be either banned or taxed so heavily that the locals are forced to buy local. .

We cannot do this as many of the imports come from CARICOM. Barbados, an island with 3 mango trees probably sells mango juice to Guyana.  This from Brazilian concentrates. 

If Guyana is too stupid to perform its role which is to develop a viable agro-industrial sector then that is our fault. Our cost structures are more favorable than those of Barbados.

Whose fault is this? 

A private sector that behaves like market hucksters only wanting to buy cheap and sell high?  And open up fast food restaurants, shopping malls, metroplex cinemas and engage in real estate and other speculation.

A gov't which thinks that everything will be solved when oil flows.  Apparently they haven't they don't see that T&T is two steps away from the IMF, despite having accumulated reserves over the past several decades.

An opposition which is more interested in promoting itself as the "party of straight hair people" so that its oligarch friends have license to steal if they regain office.

I can buy Jamaican fruit juices and canned vegetables sold by Grace Kennedy a company which has/had ambitions to trade on US stock exchanges.

I remember the 70s when we had a viable juice industry and ample local products available.

Drugb posted:
Today Guyanese scorn local products.

We boast of our Banks DIH and blocked a plan by a T&T company to buy it out.  Guyanese aren't as self hating as our oligarchs want to think.

I invite you to describe a product made in Guyana which failed because Guyanese preferred the Bajan product.  T&T, and Jamaican rums don't sell in Guyana. 

The truth is what Kari always used to say. Guyanese oligarchs prefer to use their political power and power to bribe by engaging in what they think are low risk and speculative activities.

There are people all over the Caribbean who want to buy Guyanese products.  This as the tourists complain about the shoddy Chinese made products sold in their tourist oriented stores. So even if Guyanese loathe themselves more than other Caribbean people (who have the same colonial history as we do) these others will buy it.  But it isn't available.

caribny posted:

We boast of our Banks DIH and blocked a plan by a T&T company to buy it out.  Guyanese aren't as self hating as our oligarchs want to think.

I invite you to describe a product made in Guyana which failed because Guyanese preferred the Bajan product.  T&T, and Jamaican rums don't sell in Guyana. 

The truth is what Kari always used to say. Guyanese oligarchs prefer to use their political power and power to bribe by engaging in what they think are low risk and speculative activities.

There are people all over the Caribbean who want to buy Guyanese products.  This as the tourists complain about the shoddy Chinese made products sold in their tourist oriented stores. So even if Guyanese loathe themselves more than other Caribbean people (who have the same colonial history as we do) these others will buy it.  But it isn't available.

This is easy for you to say from your armchair.  Why don't you become an entrepreneur and invest in the industries in Guyana before you pass judgement on the private sector. They are driven by profitability, if these ventures were profitable as you claim there would be a slew of investors all over the world flocking to Guyana to invest. So far we have only seen investors looking to extract natural resource, gold, oil and timber. So shut your trap and take action rather than braying all day and night as you you are no business person. 

Drugb posted:
 

This is easy for you to say from your armchair.  .. 

Aah yes. The benefits of selling Bajan mango juice and coconut water from Antigua when all of these things are right there in Guyana and can not only be produced locally but even exported.

But why do that when buying roti from Jamaica makes more "sense"!

Then you invent the lie that Guyanese hate local products to justify this.

 

caribny posted:
Drugb posted:
 

This is easy for you to say from your armchair.  .. 

Aah yes. The benefits of selling Bajan mango juice and coconut water from Antigua when all of these things are right there in Guyana and can not only be produced locally but even exported.

But why do that when buying roti from Jamaica makes more "sense"!

Then you invent the lie that Guyanese hate local products to justify this.

 

Again, I have to school you, take action rather than bray like a jackass. Go down to Guyana and develop these industries. Get the Linden, Buxton and Georgetown Blacks to start these ventures. Like you forgot what a wonderful jobs the guyfarms and coops did in PNC version 1 when the kakaba was dictating. 

GTAngler posted:
Drugb posted:

Guyanese are their own worse enemy.  They have an appetite for foreign items and don't support local products. Look how slop can boy was bragging about burger king the other day.  

Any imported item that can be produced locally at a similar quality or better should be either banned or taxed so heavily that the locals are forced to buy local. Mind you, the same people supporting buy local will at the drop of a hat do a 180 and shout racism and how the government is punishing people if implemented by the current government.

1. I thought in a free market place, it was consumer choice and demand that determined what is produced and bought.

2. Also, we are part of a global market where they are certain rules we agree to follow. Failure to follow often results in negative consequences.

3. Question - if a Guyanese manufacturer sees that he can produce the product at the same quality and sell at the same prices do make a profit, , then tell me why he or she will be not do so?

4. The recent winner of the Nobel prize in Economics did so  because of his work on how human action in the marketplace  might not necessarily always be the economically best action.

5. Please state your source that the same people who support buy local will cry racism and the government punishing them when such policy is implemented. 

6. Even if we produce a certain product  do we have a comparative advantage in producing that product?

7.  BUrnham and the PNC banned many imported products during the PNC dictatorship. Was that a successful policy that resulted in higher rates of social and economic development or were there severe negative social and economic effects in Guyana?

8. Is the preference for foreign goods a result of these being  cheaper and of better quality or is a a result of the colonial hegemonic agenda and drive?

 

 

 

 

Quote:

7.  BUrnham and the PNC banned many imported products during the PNC dictatorship.


Zed,

I would like to step in although the question was not addressed to me,the banning of selected food items was a measure taken by the dictatorial regime in that era,was due to the country lack of foreign exchange,that move was not welcomed by the people, notedly the East Indians, some of the items was their regular diet,from then on the measure that was taken,became a political spin.

Regarding the rest of your question, an economic development was created,it was not legit,it was an underground economy,the illegal food trade mushroomed,even fuel was on the list,to bolster the illegal activities illegal foreign exchange and corruption of the security forces increased,thinking about these events,Burnham created the run away society.

Zed posted:

6. Even if we produce a certain product  do we have a comparative advantage in producing that product?

 

 

 

 

Mr. Zed I see another poster mentioned that Guyana imports Mango Juice from Barbados and Coconut Water from Antigua. I remember in the 70's Ice Cream was produced locally. Is there a shortage of milk and sugar the main ingredients? Is there a shortage of Guava and sugar that Guava jam is imported? 

 

Mitts, I was referring specifically to comparative advantage for producing and selling products.

i am surprised how things are done here. They seem unable to integrate the production at the primary level, the packaging and processing, and marketing systems to take advantage of the opportunities that exist both in Guyana and internationally. They pay lip service to supply chain management, to local product, of products other than sugar and rice, of extending the production process here in Guyana. The relevant government agencies and the local capitalists seem to be unable to get over the mental block they have.a

i grow my own guava, vegetables, fruits, peppers, sugar cane and use all to make stuff for us to use. Somehow, many think that this is beneath them or that they do not have the extra hour in the evening to do some gardening.

 

 

 

 

Django posted:

Quote:

7.  BUrnham and the PNC banned many imported products during the PNC dictatorship.


Zed,

I would like to step in although the question was not addressed to me,the banning of selected food items was a measure taken by the dictatorial regime in that era,was due to the country lack of foreign exchange,that move was not welcomed by the people, notedly the East Indians, some of the items was their regular diet,from then on the measure that was taken,became a political spin.

Regarding the rest of your question, an economic development was created,it was not legit,it was an underground economy,the illegal food trade mushroomed,even fuel was on the list,to bolster the illegal activities illegal foreign exchange and corruption of the security forces increased,thinking about these events,Burnham created the run away society.

Nonsense, banning came from the "feed close and house the nation by 1976" mantra by kakaba. While his intentions were admirable, he targeted the traditional foods of the Indo. In fact he may have contributed to the thirst for foreign products inadvertently. When you take a toy away from a child, he/she wants that toy even more.  Had he not banned foreign products, Guyanese may never have scorned their own local products which became their only choice. 

Drugb posted:
Django posted:

Quote:

7.  BUrnham and the PNC banned many imported products during the PNC dictatorship.


Zed,

I would like to step in although the question was not addressed to me,the banning of selected food items was a measure taken by the dictatorial regime in that era,was due to the country lack of foreign exchange,that move was not welcomed by the people, notedly the East Indians, some of the items was their regular diet,from then on the measure that was taken,became a political spin.

Regarding the rest of your question, an economic development was created,it was not legit,it was an underground economy,the illegal food trade mushroomed,even fuel was on the list,to bolster the illegal activities illegal foreign exchange and corruption of the security forces increased,thinking about these events,Burnham created the run away society.

Nonsense, banning came from the "feed close and house the nation by 1976" mantra by kakaba. While his intentions were admirable, he targeted the traditional foods of the Indo. In fact he may have contributed to the thirst for foreign products inadvertently. When you take a toy away from a child, he/she wants that toy even more.  Had he not banned foreign products, Guyanese may never have scorned their own local products which became their only choice. 

Well apparently you don't know Guyana's history,revisit the period of the 80's.

Drugb posted:
Django posted:
Well apparently you don't know Guyana's history,revisit the period of the 80's.

Ow bai, no wonder some posters describe you as dull boy.  As I continue to school you, see this article from SN and educate yourself. 

http://www.guyanaundersiege.co...cal/FCH%20nation.htm

 

"In pushing the earlier campaign, the Prime Minister and other government officials had appealed to the Guyanese sense of nationalism and patriotism. The Buy Local campaign was linked to the quest for food self-sufficiency which was in turn equated with the achievement of economic growth and national security. The tone was persuasive, appealing and conciliatory. The message was still the same but now the tone was harsh almost dictatorial, often insensitive almost verging on being insulting. The Guyanese people were accused of having "a saltfish mentality" for preferring salted cod, sardines and salmon. It was baldly stated, "psychologically, we are still hampered by our colonial complex. We still believe, as we have been taught to believe, that what is imported, especially from England, is better than what is Guyanese." Given the fact that a significant percentage of the Guyanese public was suspicious even resentful of the messenger, the unfortunate tone and the mode of delivery of that message, served to obscure its timeliness and relevance.

Over the next two years, the Buy Local, Sell Local campaign became an integral part of the ideology of "cooperative socialism" and of the thrust to "Feed, Clothe and House" the nation by 1976 as set out in the First Development Plan of 1972. This new policy was outlined by Prime Minister Forbes Burnham in the National Assembly during the 1972 budget debate. That debate took place in December 1971 against the background of a series of cataclysmic changes in the world economy. The most important of these was the decision of the United States of America to suspend the convertibility of dollars into gold and to impose a 10% surcharge on a long list of commodities entering the United States. This decision had far-reaching effects on both developed and developing countries especially on small economies like Guyana's.
The focus of the next article will be on the "Feed, Clothe and House" the nation drive and its aftermath in the right of changing national and international circumstances.

The announcement of the decision to Feed, Clothe and House the nation between 1972 and 1976 was the final step in what the then Minister of Finance, Mr. Desmond Hoyte, in his 1972 budget presentation in the National Assembly in December 1971 called a “grand design”. This started with government’s deliberate policy of domestic resource mobilisation and economic self-reliance. This in its turn had come swiftly on the heels of the adoption of a socialist ideology and the determination to own and control the country’s resources as an integral part of “cooperative socialism.” This was a necessary prelude to the FCH programme which would help to make us “masters of our own destiny” through the self reliance and independence it would inculcate.

The Finance Minister in his budget speech, justified government’s policy of domestic resource mobilisation and economic self-reliance. He pointed to the continued deterioration of the position of the developing countries in the world economy - a declining share of world trade, the growth of the external debt burden and the sharp contraction of the flow of resources from developed to developing countries. This on the heels of the US government’s suspension of the convertibility of the US dollar which plunged the international monetary system into chaos, ironically, at a time when the United Nations Second Development Decade had just been announced.

The Prime Minister, Forbes Burnham, in his speech to the National Assembly posited that the crisis in the world economy emphasised the need for Guyanese to strengthen our economy by increasing the level of our production and to be more dependent on ourselves for further development. To this end, government had a set of specific strategies for the FCH programme. In respect of feeding ourselves the strategy was to encourage the production of local substitutes.


 

Wallah [Chai] you rushed to find and article to prove your point,pay attention to the above.

The problem with many third world politicians is that they can really talk, tell people all the good things they plan without really knowing how to do it. 

Burnham's plan was doomed to fail because firstly, the majority of people were not involved in the process. Basically a dictatorship using good sounding words trying to fool the people. Secondly. Many incompetent people in policy development and implementation . Third, in policy development, they factored in a static instead of a dynamic international economy. Fourth, they knew nothing about cash management, failure to understand that at some polnt, you had to repay loans and pay interests. Fifth, Burnham figured that because the Americans and British put him into power and that they continued to fear the ppp getting into power, he can do what ever he wanted to do with no consequence, that help will always be available. Sixth, they failed to understand the intricacies of managing the economy, how it needed to be stimulate, the linkages and how economic development really happens. They failed to understand that the so called non capitalist road to development was just another form of elite enhancement and working people deprivation. 

I can give many more reasons. I really believe that politicians  need to brag about the things they have accomplished instead of bragging about the things they want to accomplish snd which they have not accomplished as yet.

Drugb posted:
Django posted:

Quote:

7.  BUrnham and the PNC banned many imported products during the PNC dictatorship.


Zed,

I would like to step in although the question was not addressed to me,the banning of selected food items was a measure taken by the dictatorial regime in that era,was due to the country lack of foreign exchange,that move was not welcomed by the people, notedly the East Indians, some of the items was their regular diet,from then on the measure that was taken,became a political spin.

Regarding the rest of your question, an economic development was created,it was not legit,it was an underground economy,the illegal food trade mushroomed,even fuel was on the list,to bolster the illegal activities illegal foreign exchange and corruption of the security forces increased,thinking about these events,Burnham created the run away society.

Nonsense, banning came from the "feed close and house the nation by 1976" mantra by kakaba. While his intentions were admirable, he targeted the traditional foods of the Indo. In fact he may have contributed to the thirst for foreign products inadvertently. When you take a toy away from a child, he/she wants that toy even more.  Had he not banned foreign products, Guyanese may never have scorned their own local products which became their only choice. 

Boast again how you and your family became wealthy from your smuggling operation during the ban.

Zed posted:
 

Mitts, I was referring specifically to comparative advantage for producing and selling products.

i am surprised how things are done here. They seem unable to integrate the production at the primary level, the packaging and processing, and marketing systems to take advantage of the opportunities that exist both in Guyana and internationally. They pay lip service to supply chain management, to local product, of products other than sugar and rice, of extending the production process here in Guyana. The relevant government agencies and the local capitalists seem to be unable to get over the mental block they have.a

i grow my own guava, vegetables, fruits, peppers, sugar cane and use all to make stuff for us to use. Somehow, many think that this is beneath them or that they do not have the extra hour in the evening to do some gardening.

 

 

 

 

Thank you Mr. Zed. I  feel that most Guyanese can live off the land. But I think the Barrels and Remittances have created a superficial dependency and laissez-faire attitude.

I am happy to learn that you grow your own. 

The human mind is very strange. When we lived in Guyana, we preferred foreign things. Now that we are in North America, we are making some merchants very rich as they overcharge us for products from Guyana which we once relegated to second option. There was a time when we were in Guyana that we craved American cars. Now that we live in North America, we prefer Japanese and European ones.

ksazma posted:

The human mind is very strange. When we lived in Guyana, we preferred foreign things. Now that we are in North America, we are making some merchants very rich as they overcharge us for products from Guyana which we once relegated to second option. There was a time when we were in Guyana that we craved American cars. Now that we live in North America, we prefer Japanese and European ones.

So true, Even today  in Canada we still prefer Cadbury chocolates and Quality Sweets  from England. Whenever we buy rice and sugar ,it must be from Guyana. Our minds were programmed to believe that imported products were superior .I have a few friends that would not drink Canadian beer, but only foreign beers. As for cars, my first was a GM product, and after that I have German and Japanese because they are better vehicles.

kp posted:
ksazma posted:

The human mind is very strange. When we lived in Guyana, we preferred foreign things. Now that we are in North America, we are making some merchants very rich as they overcharge us for products from Guyana which we once relegated to second option. There was a time when we were in Guyana that we craved American cars. Now that we live in North America, we prefer Japanese and European ones.

So true, Even today  in Canada we still prefer Cadbury chocolates and Quality Sweets  from England. Whenever we buy rice and sugar ,it must be from Guyana. Our minds were programmed to believe that imported products were superior .I have a few friends that would not drink Canadian beer, but only foreign beers. As for cars, my first was a GM product, and after that I have German and Japanese because they are better vehicles.

In our defense, the Cadbury bar from England tastes better than the US one. Plus this is always top of the line.   

Image result for caramel bar

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Drugb posted:
.
 

Again, I have to school you, take action rather than bray like a jackass. dictating. 

And here I thought that Indos were such excellent businessmen.  Turns out that all the can do is buy what some one else makes and sell it.

Go to Jamaica and learn lessons from Jamaicans.

Mitwah posted:
Zed posted:

6. Even if we produce a certain product  do we have a comparative advantage in producing that product?

 

 

 

 

Mr. Zed I see another poster mentioned that Guyana imports Mango Juice from Barbados and Coconut Water from Antigua. I remember in the 70's Ice Cream was produced locally. Is there a shortage of milk and sugar the main ingredients? Is there a shortage of Guava and sugar that Guava jam is imported? 

Apparently Trinidadians buy raw coconuts from Guyana, process it and thene resell it to Guyanese. Druggie loves this strategy and thinks that it makes excellent business sense.  He then wails that Guyanese with education must migrate because they cannot find work in Guyana.

If Guyanese pick coconuts and Trinidadians process them, brand them, market them and get more value added then clearly Trinidad will offer more opportunities for ambitious Guyanese than Guyana itself.

Trinidadian business people are more innovative and risk oriented than their Guyanese counterparts. I can say the same for Jamaicans. Interestingly enough even the stick in the mud conservative Bajans are also ahead.  Guyanese slurp down Bajan fruit juices when 40 years ago we exported them to Barbados.

Druggie then screams that Guyanese will prefer a Bajan product or a T&T product ahead of their own.  Not likely.

Mitwah posted:

Boast again how you and your family became wealthy from your smuggling operation during the ban.

No wonder he endorses economic development based on buying Bajan guava juice and selling it to Guyanese.

Note that Barbados has few guava trees.  They import guava concentrate from Brazil and add sugar and water and then sell it to Guyanese.

caribny posted:

Apparently Trinidadians buy raw coconuts from Guyana, process it and thene resell it to Guyanese. Druggie loves this strategy and thinks that it makes excellent business sense.  He then wails that Guyanese with education must migrate because they cannot find work in Guyana.

If Guyanese pick coconuts and Trinidadians process them, brand them, market them and get more value added then clearly Trinidad will offer more opportunities for ambitious Guyanese than Guyana itself.

Trinidadian business people are more innovative and risk oriented than their Guyanese counterparts. I can say the same for Jamaicans. Interestingly enough even the stick in the mud conservative Bajans are also ahead.  Guyanese slurp down Bajan fruit juices when 40 years ago we exported them to Barbados.

Druggie then screams that Guyanese will prefer a Bajan product or a T&T product ahead of their own.  Not likely.

If it was profitable business model in Guyana, jackass Granger and his cohorts would have already done so. So don't keep blaming the IndoG for the lack of manufacturing. You go and spend your money and effort and then come back and give a report of how well you are doing. 

caribny posted:
Drugb posted:
.
 

Again, I have to school you, take action rather than bray like a jackass. dictating. 

And here I thought that Indos were such excellent businessmen.  Turns out that all the can do is buy what some one else makes and sell it.

Go to Jamaica and learn lessons from Jamaicans.

As I explained, you should go and create this business in Guyana as you have the answers. Don't push this on the IndoG shoulder just so you can blame them for failure. There are enough Black PNC Guyanese overseas who can pool their money and develop these industries. 

caribny posted:
Drugb posted:
 

If it was profitable business model in Guyana,

Why don't you ask yourself why this is 23 years of PPP rule. A SMALLER industrial sector than what Guyana had under Burnham!

Why am I to answer for the PPP? What has the PNC done so far? Under PPP the country developed visibly compared to the previous 28 years of the PNC when the country was broken. With all these brilliant ideas, I suggest you go to Guyana and put your money where your mouth is. But I suspect you are a talker and not a doer. 

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