For the record

I interacted on a couple of threads last night and the debate was about the firing of the attorney General, and her decision to go against the president executive order on the controversial Immigration ban.

I promised to research the legal grounds for her firing, and if her decision to go against an executive order of the president was legal and just.

Unfortunately, I did not get the full cope of the legality surrounding this case, and I am asking for members participation to bring some clarity to this unsolved issue for our audience. 

I consider this to be a great topic of discussion, and I hope the hear from some legal minds among us.

Original Post

She was acting AG. However, cabinet members are confirmed by the Senate but do not have a set term so they serve at the pleasure of the President and can be fired at any time. 

There are positions that are confirmed by the Senate for fixed terms like the Chair of the Federal Reserve that cannot be fired by the President.

In the case of organizations like FERC the commissioners are confirmed by the Senate for a fixed term but the President appoints one of the commissioners to be Chair.

This was a brilliant public relations move by Sally Yates.  Her days were numbered, as once Jeff Sessions was confirmed as Attorney General she had to go.  But she figured out it was a good opportunity to leave with guns blazing and get some publicity on the way out while creating unnecessary political stir. 

For those who never knew the name Sally Yates, know her now.  Watch how quick she finds a job with her newly earned fame.

Bibi Haniffa posted:
RiffRaff posted:

WHat makes you think she would not have found a good job otherwise? 

Did I say that???????????

Intelligent readers can infer that from this sentence: "Watch how quick she finds a job with her newly earned fame."

Sally Yates is an intelligent woman who can find a job anytime she wants.  Her recent 15 minutes of fame will ensure that she lands in the right place by opening doors for her that may not have been so obvious prior to her firing.

For anyone to infer that my comment above means that she cannot find a job is shallow and ludicrous.

Bibi Haniffa posted:

Sally Yates is an intelligent woman who can find a job anytime she wants.  Her recent 15 minutes of fame will ensure that she lands in the right place by opening doors for her that may not have been so obvious prior to her firing.

For anyone to infer that my comment above means that she cannot find a job is shallow and ludicrous.

What exactly does:

"Watch how quick she finds a job with her newly earned fame."

mean...?

What doors are being opened that were not open before?

Career

From 1985 to 1989, Yates practiced with the law firm King & Spalding in Atlanta. In 1989, she was hired as Assistant U.S. Attorney by Bob Barr for the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Northern District of Georgia.[6] In 1994, she became Chief of the Fraud and Public Corruption Section. She was the lead prosecutor in the case of Eric Rudolph, who committed the Centennial Olympic Park bombing,[7] a terrorist convicted for a series of anti-abortion and anti-gay bombings across the southern United States between 1996 and 1998, which killed two people and injured over 120 others.[8]She rose to First Assistant U.S. Attorney in 2002 and to Acting U.S. Attorney in 2004. In the U.S. Attorney's office she held leadership positions under both Republican and Democratic administrations.[9]

President Barack Obama nominated Yates to be U.S. Attorney in the Northern District of Georgia. She was confirmed by the Senate on March 10, 2010.[6] During her time as a U.S. Attorney, Yates was appointed by Attorney General Eric Holder to serve as Vice Chair of the Attorney General's Advisory Committee.[6]

Deputy Attorney General

On May 13, 2015, the United States Senate voted 84–12 to confirm Yates as Deputy Attorney General of the United States, the second-highest-ranking position in the Justice Department;[10][11] during her confirmation hearing, Senator Jeff Sessions encouraged her to resist unlawful orders.[12] She served under Attorney General Loretta Lynch, who took office shortly before Yates's confirmation.[5][13]

 
 Yates, in her confirmation hearing, agrees with Senator Sessions that an attorney general has the duty to disobey unlawful orders.[14]

As Deputy Attorney General, Yates was responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Justice Department, which included approximately 113,000 employees. In 2015, she authored the policy, known as the "Yates memo" prioritizing the prosecution of executives for corporate crimes.[15][16] During the final days of the Obama administration, she oversaw the review of 16,000 petitions for executive clemency, making recommendations to the President.[17]

 

 

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