Jagdeo Economics

Stabroek News

Qualfon opens US$4M  Providence campus

-11 years after initial bleak encounter

http://www.stabroeknews.com/20...m-providence-campus/

 

KAITEUR NEWS:

Qualfon opens US $4 Million

Providence location

 

http://www.kaieteurnewsonline....providence-location/

 

 

-    expected to provide 6,000 jobs in five years.

-   The facility will be built in two phases, with an estimated completion of 2016.

The first phase was completed at the cost of US$4M

 

 

 

 

Chronicle:

 

Qualfon opens world-class US$12M campus at Providence  –

President lauds investment, says Gov’t committed to human resource development

 

 

http://guyanachronicle.com/qua...esource-development/

 

 Interesting

$4M PRIVATE investment

brings 6,000 Jobs

 

while Jagdeo  

$58M GOVT.  Investment

in the Marriott

brings 300 Jobs.

 

Ramotar was given the NCN Report for quite a while now.  PPP operatives put public NCN cheques into their personal accounts.  The President said he was studying the reports.  Is he simply a slow reader, learning disabled, or did Jagdeo tell him not to do anything?

 

This is a ringing endorsement of stealing, and so wrong from many angles. The PPP is so arrogant, has no shame, no morality, and we must end their addiction to stealing. Is this the party of Jagan?  "They have made my father's house into a den of thieves."

 

 

 

Granger, how far is the mad house from Whim? Why Moses? Just in case. I fool them coolie people once and tell them horrible things about you. Now I am eating poke and plantain with you. Granger: I don't want to hear that shit, Moses. You promise 11% neemakarams coolies like youself. Moses: Ok, Grangar, I will do my best. Moses: Ramjattannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn. ah weh you deh. Come, I might need help. Rumjhaat to Moses...that is the price you have to pay to follow another neemakaram like myself. I never say the job will be easy....good luck.  

 

The New York connection: Audition for an Opposition by Paul Sanders

Caribbean Daylight, NY March 2015

 

 

It looked like a scene from The Walking Dead.

Zombies. You knew you were in for a treat when they showed up. Equally emotional and comedic,

ramshackled by age, vanquished by capitalists' greed, decimated by a brutal New York winter, this ragtag bunch

of socialist revolutionaries braced the freezing Spring sunshine, waiting in a frenzy for the March Madness.

No olive branches. No songs of Hosannah. Just placards. Ridiculous. Retarded. Stupid. Placards.

"Opposition groups the world over come out to demonstrate and protest their governments; today we see the

government protesting the opposition ....." Moses Nagamootoo. Innovative, intelligent, and brilliantly funny,

Mr. Nagamootoo's punch line forged new terriority in a smart and funny hour with his audience that was more

honest and direct.

The masterpiece of Mr. Nagamootoo's comic relief is his surveillance of the weirdos' early audition outside the

Naresa Palace. Any street-smart junkie would agree. The New York chapter of the PPP's psychological warfare

was crashing on takeoff. But the ridicule came nonstop, like a laugh script right out of a Laff Til Yuh Belly Bust

production.

When it comes to swagger and sizzle, Brigadier David Granger is up to nines. His lovable stream-of-

consciousness delivery, flexing a skill in a certain narration that made him a distinction from Forbes Burnham

was magnificently funny.

"I am not Burnham. I'm David Granger.....I'm the president of the future. I am leading Guyana into the future. I

am not leading Guyana into the past..... we are moving forward, we are not moving backwards," Mr. Granger

told the meeting.

He was talking back from the hall to a tramp's placard outside while simultaneously fielding the same enquiry

from an audience member. It was sheer coincidence; but that come back was a flight on outstretched wings of

hope, confidence. Like a dagger it drove a hole in the heart of the PPP's vampire machinery that has tried so

hard lately to equate him with Forbes Burnham, rigged elections, the turbulent 60's and racism.

"Moving forward ... not moving backwards." The future. All about the future. Will he be able to bring his

unique brand of politics to the national stage? It's what this elections is about. It's what Mr. Granger was

marketing.

The return of expatriates with the know-how as the engine for growth and development; the remaking of a

new society that curbs the runaway crime that has gripped today's Guyana; the halt to corruption as the new

normal; the protection of the environment and the resources of the forest and the rights of the indigenous

people.

This kind of talk that has his foes eyeing his meteoric rise with both awe and fear. All the good stuff like the

Sermon on the Mount. Like the holding of local elections, which is a real pain-in-the-ass issue for the ruling

PPP, locally and internationally. And fixing the "dirty" electors list.

But the obstacles, cagey or dumb, were visible outside the hall. A riff raff rabble rouser held a sign that

scornfully read: Moses Nagamootoo is a Nemakaram. The equivalent of a traitor. Ole story. Ole trick from the

PPP's handbook.

Nemakaram is a multi faceted word with layers of contempt and hatred. The PPP's renewed application by the

hate group in Queens was meant for the East Indians, people like Mr. Nagamootoo who dared to speak out

against Democratic Centralism. The word also lives at PPP stronghold mandirs where Appan Jhaat is espoused

to incite racism and racial voting. Last Sunday, it was meant to ostracize Mr. Nagamootoo.

But it was also Mr. Nagamooto's cue. He took the podium and displayed the details of his life: as a little lad in

the Whim village playing with his fellow Afro Guyanese friends and neighbors and harboring great family

connections, to his years as a young revolutionary under the wings of Cheddi Jagan and his eventual graduation

at being his master's confidant. Nice story.

Nagamootoo's betrayal to the Indian cause is that he spoke too hard and openly about the corruption in his

party. He questioned too forcefully about his comrades' rags to riches phenomena. He knew the PPP had lost

its moorings. The kleptocrats were more united than the workers of all countries.

"This coalition must work ... it has eluded us for 60 years, but it is now a reality.... about being in control of

destiny" Mr. Nagamootoo insisted. Oh yeah? Is that national unity? A government of all, for all, by all?

Something like that, right?

Sounds like racial unity to me. Sign me up, brudda.

The Apaan Jhaatists would have none of that. Ah, ah, aah! The rancor exuded by the wack jobs at the picket

line sounded like a nice, little softcore Ku Klux Klan with an all Indian agenda disguised as a freedom of speech

act. There was an undercurrent of racial animosity. When asked to explain their position, the wingnuts flew

into a frenzied scramble down memory lane and incoherent blabberings.

Epic idiocy. No wonder passerbys mistook them for vagrants dismantling their cardboard houses. One curious

shopper, upon stumbling at the activity, enquired whether there was a new " Soup Kitchen" in the

neighborhood.

The meeting itself was a metaphor for the PPP overseas supporters. Should Guyanese be excited about the

future or being held hostage by the past? Should Guyanese allow the past to overcome the present? Should

overseas Guyanese advance with the speed of civilization and urge their compatriots at home to stay shackled

by the past?

Does the PPP want racial unity? Yes, the kind that you see at the mandirs recently in which the devotees

fought over the money. Yes, unity but only in writing. Not in life as in living with a balance of merit and good

faith in economic opportunity without the partisan clause.

It is the nastiness of the PPP's version of racial harmony that has brought the necessity of coalition

arrangements. And you get a glimpse of their ugly, desperate side on the sidewalks as they were last Sunday.

Listen to Mr. Nagamootoo, listen to Mr. Granger, and there is a certain passion to identify with. A feeling of

hope, of a reawakening of the Guyanese spirit and patriotism that permeated the walls. Both men spoke with

authority, as if they found the city of El Dorado.

If you felt the vibes in that hall you know there's a certain zeitgeist of the times. Those who were once silent

are now registering their protests, exposing their disgust at the PPP while expressing support to this idea of

coalition. Or multi racial politics. People say they're down on that.

These new believers are holding hope that the APNU+AFC will have the perseverance to pursue a program that

actively build bridges across the racial divide. That goodwill and cohesion run across the color spectrum

unhibited.

Mr. Granger and Mr. Nagamootoo both contextualized an economy in fast growth with rigid accountability and

transparency oversight, one that is in total polarization with the current PPP regime.

But again, it is all talk. The PPP had 23 years of empty talk and nothing to show for it, and more talk about

nothing but just talk. This time, the coalition is saying they have got it right. Their tagline: It is Time.

It better be.